competition

Red Teaming is a revolutionary new way to make critical and contrarian thinking part of the planning process of any organization, allowing companies to stress-test their strategies, flush out hidden threats and missed opportunities and avoid being sandbagged by competitors.

Bryce G. Hoffman is a bestselling author, speaker and consultant who helps companies around the world plan better and leaders around the world lead better by applying innovative systems from the worlds of business and the military. Before launching his international consulting practice in 2014, Hoffman was an award-winning financial journalist who spent 22 years covering the global automotive, high-tech and biotech industries for newspapers in Michigan and California. He writes a regular column on leadership and culture for Forbes.com and regularly appears on television and radio shows in the United States and around the world.

In his book, Red Teaming, Hoffman shows how the most innovative and disruptive companies, such as Google and Toyota, already employ some of these techniques organically.

The Volkswagen Scandal

Aug 2, 2017

In mid-2015, Volkswagen proudly reached its goal of surpassing Toyota as the world’s largest automaker. A few months later, the EPA disclosed that Volkswagen had installed software in 11 million cars that deceived emissions-testing mechanisms.

By early 2017, VW had settled with American regulators and car owners for $20 billion, with additional lawsuits still looming. In Faster, Higher, Farther, Jack Ewing rips the lid off the conspiracy.

When Hungarian professor Ernő Rubik invented the Rubik’s Cube (or, rather, his Cube) in the 1970s out of wooden blocks, rubber bands, and paper clips, he didn’t even know if it could be solved, let alone that it would become the world’s most popular puzzle. Since its creation, the Cube has become many things to many people: one of the bestselling children’s toys of all time, a symbol of intellectual prowess, a frustrating puzzle with 43.2 quintillion possible permutations, and now a worldwide sporting phenomenon that is introducing the classic brainteaser to a new generation.

In Cracking the Cube, Ian Scheffler reveals that cubing isn’t just fun and games. Along with participating in speedcubing competitions—from the World Championship to local tournaments—and interviewing key figures from the Cube’s history, he journeys to Budapest to seek a meeting with the legendary and notoriously reclusive Rubik, who is still tinkering away with puzzles in his seventies.

  In 2014 in honor of the 10th Anniversary of the Center for Biotechnology and Interdisciplinary Studies (CBIS), Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute partnered with the Seymour Fox Memorial Foundation to establish The Seymour Fox Lecture and Prize for Biotechnology Innovation.

Now in its second year, it is a local high school academic competition focused on pairing innovative ideas of local students with the resources available at Rensselaer’s CBIS, to improve life through biotechnology.

The submission deadline is February 1 and we are joined now by Dr. Glenn Monastersky to tell us more. Dr. Monastersky is a Professor of Practice in Biomedical Engineering at RPI and is the Principal Investigator and Director of the Rensselaer Center for Stem Cell Research.

A statewide competition in Massachusetts hopes to help up to 20 small cities find ways to solve major problems through collaborations.

The Working Cities Challenge, which will launch on Friday, intends to revitalize small and medium sized post-industrial cities in the commonwealth by bringing together leadership from the public and private sectors to brainstorm and initiate their own solutions. Eligible cities in Western Massachusetts include Pittsfield, Westfield, Springfield, Holyoke, and Chicopee. 

    What are the differences between a winning and losing performance? Why are we able to rise to the challenge one day, but wilt from it the next? Can we in fact become better competitors? In Top Dog: The Science of Winning and Losing, Po Bronson and Ashley Merryman use cutting edge science to tease out the hidden factors at the core of every great triumph - and every tragic failure.

Po Bronson joins us.

  On November 14, 1889, Nellie Bly, the crusading young female reporter for Joseph Pulitzer’s World newspaper, left New York City by steamship on a quest to break the record for the fastest trip around the world.

Also departing from New York that day—and heading in the opposite direction by train—was a young journalist from The Cosmopolitan magazine, Elizabeth Bisland. Each woman was determined to outdo Jules Verne’s fictional hero Phileas Fogg and circle the globe in less than eighty days. The dramatic race that ensued would span twenty-eight thousand miles, captivate the nation, and change both competitors’ lives forever.