corruption

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Halfmoon town supervisor “Mindy” Warmouth faces up to seven years in prison after hearing charges Thursday in connection with allegedly stealing thousands from her campaign committee.

New York's anti-corruption commission that's asking state lawmakers to reveal private law clients has the backing of the state Bar Association, which says attorney-client privilege doesn't bar the disclosure required in 20 other states.

The New York State Bar Association argues the names often are already in public court records; they're just not collected in a place for the public and ethics enforcers to see.

More Senators On Wiretap

May 8, 2013
New York State Senate

Nine more names of New York state Senators and others potentially involved in corruption were made public Wednesday, when a judge ordered prosecutors in the case of convicted ex-Senator Shirley Huntley to make public the names of  her colleagues that she had secretly recorded.

Eight more names of lawmakers  and others potentially involved in corruption were made public Wednesday, when a judge ordered prosecutors in the case of convicted ex- Senator Shirley Huntley to make public the names of  her colleagues that she secretly recorded.  WAMC's Capitol Correspondent Karen Dewitt reports.

Karen DeWitt

A hearing by Senate Republicans on New York City’s public campaign financing system was overshadowed by protests, as government reform groups and other members of the public were denied entry, and noisy protests ensued.

The Senate GOP sent out notices that there would be a public hearing on what the Republicans say are the “abuses” in New York City’s public campaign finance system.

Liz Benjamin: Trouble For "Senator #1"

May 6, 2013
Liz Benjamin
YNN, Capital Tonight

Et Tu, Shirley?

Since the revelation that former Bronx Assemblyman Nelson Castro had been working as a double agent for federal prosecutors for almost the entire duration of his four years in office, the most popular political parlor game in Albany has been trying to guess who else might be wearing a wire.

Corruption Still Dominates Discussion in Albany

Apr 22, 2013
wikipedia commons

Anti-corruption is the dominant topic at the New York State legislature for the second week in a row, following bribery charges against two state lawmakers, including a former Senate leader. As Karen DeWitt reports, a new poll finds 81 percent of voters expect more Senators and Assemblymembers will be arrested.

A poll finds New Yorkers are upset about recent corruption scandals in Albany, and think that Governor Cuomo should take the lead to clean things up.

The Quinnipiac University poll finds that more New Yorkers than ever think government corruption is a “very serious” problem, following two high-profile scandals in which a Senator and Assemblyman have been charged with bribery. Another Assemblyman admitted to being a government informant and said he’d been wearing wire on and off for the past four years.

New York State lawmakers are returning to work after a two-week spring break. It’s their first meeting since two lawmakers have been charged with bribery in corruption scandals.

Senators and Assemblymembers met for the first time since Senator Malcolm Smith was charged with trying to bribe his way onto the Republican New York City Mayoral ticket, among other things, and Assemblyman Eric Stevenson was accused of taking thousands of dollars to write legislation to benefit developers of an adult day care center.

Two days after a state Senator was arrested for trying to bribe his way onto the New York City mayoral ballot, a state Assemblyman has been accused of accepting  payments to sponsor legislation that would benefit developers of an adult day care center in the Bronx.

It was déjà vu all over again, as U.S. Attorney Preet Bharara stepped to the microphones to announce that yet another New York state lawmaker has been accused of bribery and corruption.

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