courtroom

John Grisham has sold more than 300 million copies of his books and has had 29 consecutive No. 1 books on the New York Times fiction bestsellers list.

His latest novel, Camino Island, is about a heist of the original manuscripts of F. Scott Fitzgerald's novels and the efforts to retrieve them.

In 1991, the police were called to East 72nd St. in Manhattan, where a woman's body had fallen from a twelfth-story window. The woman’s husband, Herbert Weinstein, soon confessed to having hit and strangled his wife after an argument, then dropping her body out of their apartment window to make it look like a suicide. The 65-year-old Weinstein, a quiet, unassuming retired advertising executive, had no criminal record, no history of violent behavior—not even a short temper. How, then, to explain this horrific act?
 
Journalist Kevin Davis uses the perplexing story of the Weinstein murder to present a riveting, deeply researched exploration of the intersection of neuroscience and criminal justice. Shortly after Weinstein was arrested, an MRI revealed a cyst the size of an orange on his brain’s frontal lobe, the part of the brain that governs judgment and impulse control. Weinstein’s lawyer seized on that discovery, arguing that the cyst had impaired Weinstein’s judgment and that he should not be held criminally responsible for the murder. It was the first case in the United States in which a judge allowed a scan showing a defendant’s brain activity to be admitted as evidence to support a claim of innocence.

Kevin Davis' new book is The Brain Defense: Murder in Manhattan and the Dawn of Neuroscience in America's Courtrooms.

    When a drive-by shooting in Holyoke, Massachusetts, claims the lives of a Puerto Rican drug dealer and a hockey mom volunteering at an inner-city clinic, the police arrest a rival gang member. With no death penalty in Massachusetts, the US attorney shifts the double homicide out of state jurisdiction into federal court so he can seek a death sentence.

This is the plot of The Hanging Judge: A Novel – it is based on the experience of the author, a senior judge on the United States District Court for the District of Massachusetts – Michael Ponsor.

    David Rosenfelt has done it again. Told with his characteristic humor and wit his new book, Hounded is a heartfelt story about family and a page-turning legal thriller.

Rosenfelt will be in Saratoga tonight from 7-10 for "An Evening with Best Selling Author David Rosenfelt" To Benefit the Saratoga County Animal Shelter presented by Friends of Saratoga County Animal Shelter.

Guilt By Degrees

May 18, 2012

Marcia Rachel Clark is an American prosecutor, author, and television correspondent who gained fame as the head prosecutor in the O.J. Simpson murder case. We welcome Marcia Clark and speak with her about her second D.A. Rachel Knight novel, Guilt by Degrees .