Reed Farrel Coleman, called “a hard-boiled poet” by NPR’s Maureen Corrigan, is the Edgar-nominated author of eighteen novels and three novellas, including the critically acclaimed Moe Prager series.

He's taken over writing the late Robert B. Parker's Jesse Stone character and the new book in the series is Blind Spot.

  The Washington Post calls our next guest “one of the most talented crime writers alive.” Tana French is the author of four bestselling, critically acclaimed, and award-winning novels in which she has mastered the psychology of the criminal mind.

WAMC photo by Dave Lucas

Under intense public pressure to stop a perceived crime wave, Troy police called a press conference this morning to announce three arrests in two homicides.

A 33-year old homeless man identified as Daniel Reuter and Jacob Heimroth, also 33, of Troy, were arrested Monday for the August 20th beating deaths of Allen and Maria Lockrow, found beaten to death in their home.

WAMC photo by Dave Lucas

Police have beefed up patrols in the crime-plagued "Collar City." 

Responding to a series of recent incidents, and resident's concerns about shootings and arsons,  Troy Police have suspended mandatory and optional training sessions to get more officers out on the streets. The move puts 20 additional bodies on the beat. Police Chief John Tedesco says officers have been added to the afternoon and evening shifts. The Narcotics Unit and other special terms are increasing their presence as well.  The police department's budget will increase, but officials couldn't say by how much.

WAMC photo by Dave Lucas

Officials in Troy are  addressing growing concern over what appears to be a spiraling crime rate.

Shootings - arsons - murders – Troy: Public perception of the Collar City has been tinged by the darkness of crime in recent weeks, despite public meetings and soul-searching in the city of about 50,000. Police Chief Tedesco is reassuring citizens.

Each year in New York, more than 45,000 16-and 17-year-olds are arrested and face the possibility of prosecution as adults in criminal court. If convicted, these juveniles are housed in adult jails and prisons, which advocates and some in state government want to change.


Residents of Troy are concerned about an uptick in crime. Citizens and officials are furthering separate initiatives  to “take back” the Collar City.

A seemingly never-ending spate of shootings, stabbings and more recently, arsons, has galvanized some neighbors in Lansingburgh and other areas of the city to take steps to help thwart crime.

East Greenbush police are investigating a double-murder suicide.

Police were dispatched to 58 Rockrose drive in the wee hours of Tuesday morning - a woman recently released from a mental institution attempted to take her own life and the lives of her two young daughters, ages 6 and 11. Responders found all three in "grave" condition - they were taken to Albany Medical Center hospital where they were pronounced dead. Autopsies have been scheduled. Time Warner Cable News reports the woman was overcome with grief after her son committed suicide in April.

    In her bestseller Room, writer Emma Donoghue imagined what life would be like for a little boy born into captivity, to a mother who'd been kidnapped and sexually assaulted.

And in her new novel, Frog Music, she's imagined a possible solution to a very real murder, one that took place in California in 1876. That crime was never solved. But Emma Donoghue has gone through historical records to write what might have happened.

    In France at the end of the nineteenth century a great debate raged over the question of whether someone could be hypnotically compelled to commit a crime in violation of his or her moral convictions. When Toussaint-Augustin Gouffé entered 3, rue Tronson du Coudray, he expected nothing but a delightful assignation with the comely young Gabrielle Bompard. Instead, he was murdered—hanged!—by her and her companion Michel Eyraud. The body was then stuffed in a trunk and dumped on a riverbank near Lyon.

As the inquiry into the guilt or innocence of the woman the French tabloids dubbed the "Little Demon" escalated, the most respected minds in France debated whether Gabrielle Bompard was the pawn of her mesmerizing lover or simply a coldly calculating murderess.

Steven Levingston, the nonfiction editor of The Washington Post, writes about Gabrielle Bompard and hypnosis in his book, Little Demon in the City of Light: A True Story of Murder and Mesmerism in Belle Époque Paris.