culture

Why We Dance

Aug 17, 2015

  Kimerer L. LaMothe is a dancer, philosopher, and scholar of religion.

She also loves to dance, every day, feeling it is vital for her wellbeing. And when she scans the landscape of human life, she sees dance everywhere—in the earliest human art, the oldest forms of culture, and in every culture around the world into the present.

But, she says, in the maps of and for human life that comprise the philosophy, theology, and religious studies of the modern west, dance occupies a surprisingly small space. So, she has explored that in her new book: Why We Dance.

  In recent decades, America has been waging a veritable war on fat in which not just public health authorities, but every sector of society is engaged in constant “fat talk” aimed at educating, badgering, and ridiculing heavy people into shedding pounds. We hear a great deal about the dangers of fatness to the nation, but little about the dangers of today’s epidemic of fat talk to individuals and society at large. The human trauma caused by the war on fat is disturbing - and it is virtually unknown.

Susan Greenhalgh is Professor of Anthropology at Harvard University. In her book, Fat-Talk Nation, Greenhalgh shows how the war on fat has produced a generation of young people who are obsessed with their bodies and whose most fundamental sense of self comes from their size.

  This coming weekend marks the celebration of the 38th Annual East Durham Irish Festival in East Durham, NY. The festival keeps the Irish American tradition alive with music, dance and more!

This year’s line-up includes: The Narrowbacks, The Fighting Jamesons, Whittlin' Donkeys, Andy Cooney, Celtic Cross and more - including 4 bagpipe shows and 4 step dancing shows – and that’s not all! There will be a new beer garden, cottage tours, map of Ireland tour, amusement rides, and an Irish Children’s play.

Here to tell us more are Bernadette Gavin and Kitty Kelly.

We hear all the time about weight gain, weight loss, how Americans are the heaviest we have ever been, and myriad plans for remedying our egregious fatness. Yet, what if much of what we are told, and what we believe, simply is not true?

Writer Harriet Brown set out to explore our relentless obsession with weight and thinness in the new book Body of Truth: How Science, History, and Culture Drive Our Obsession with Weight--and What We Can Do about It.

ciachef.edu

It’s not just about cooking. With the food landscape changing rapidly, companies are increasingly in need of expertise in food policy, community involvement, global issues, food systems, and much more.

That is why you can now study food history, cultures, and cuisines in the CIA’s Bachelor of Professional Studies in the Applied Food Studies program.

To tell us more, we welcome Beth Forrest - an associate professor of liberal arts here where she teaches the Introduction to Gastronomy course as well as History and Cultures of Europe, Food History, and Global Cuisines and Cultures.

  Also here is Deirdre Murphy who teaches History and Cultures of Asia, a course for juniors and seniors pursuing bachelor’s degrees in culinary management or baking and pastry management. Dr. Murphy also teaches electives in The Ecology of Food and Food and Culture.

  Simon Majumdar is a food writer, broadcaster, and author of Eat My Globe and Eating for Britain. He is a recurring judge on Iron Chef, The Next Iron Chef, and Cutthroat Kitchen. He is the fine living correspondent for AskMen.com and he writes regular features for the Food Network website.

He joins us to talk about about his new book, Fed, White, and Blue: Finding America with My Fork, an exploration into the food cultures that make up America—brewing beer, picking vegetables, working at a food bank, and even finding himself, very reluctantly, at a tailgate.

  Curated by Hilary Somers Deely and Barbara Sims, Made in the Berkshires is a locally-grown festival of new works including theatre, film, dance, poetry, music, short stories, performance and visual art.

This year’s festival takes place Friday, October 10th through Sunday, October 12th at The Colonial Theatre, The Unicorn Theatre, and The Garage.

Hilary Somers Deely and Barbara Sims join us now along with Kate Maguire. Kate is the Artistic Director and CEO of The Berkshire Theatre Group – whose stages host Made in the Berkshires. Kate will also tell us about a world premiere play that BTG is presenting in October - written and directed by Eric Hill and featuring David Adkins - POE tells the story Edgar Allan Poe - the great American poet and short story writer and his mysterious disappearance for four days in Baltimore in 1849.

    Joseph Luzzi is the author of Romantic Europe and the Ghost of Italy, which won the Scaglione Prize for Italian Studies from the Modern Language Association. His writing has appeared in The New York Times, the Los Angeles Times, Bookforum, and The Times Literary Supplement. He has received an essay award from the Dante Society of America, a teaching prize from Yale College, and a fellowship from the National Endowment for the Humanities. The first American-born child in his Italian family, he earned his doctorate from Yale University and is a professor at Bard College.

In his new book, My Two Italies, Joseph Luzzi - child of Italian immigrants and an award-winning scholar of Italian literature - straddles these two perspectives to link his family’s dramatic story to Italy’s north-south divide, its quest for a unifying language, and its passion for art, food, and family.

Many factors influence how a child understands and interprets the human body and its related physical behaviors.

Georgia Panagiotaki, lecturer in psychology at the University of East Anglia, studied a diverse pool of children to make conclusions about their bodily comprehension.

What Is Cinco De Mayo?

May 5, 2014

    

  Cinco de Mayo has become a big deal in the U.S. in recent years. But it is not a major holiday in Mexico. It is the commemoration of a Mexican military victory over France.

It was actually a marketing push by Corona beer that created the Cinco de Mayo we know today, filled with parties, food and, of course, lots of drink. St. Patrick's Day has a similar disconnect between the holiday in the home country and the way it is celebrated in America.

Here now to speak about how the U.S. appropriates ethnic and cultural holidays from other countries are Culinary Institute of America Professors Beth Forrest and Deirdre Murphy.

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