Dalai Lama

Nobel Peace Prize Laureates His Holiness the Dalai Lama and Archbishop Desmond Tutu have survived more than fifty years of exile and the soul-crushing violence of oppression. Despite their hardships—or, as they would say, because of them—they are two of the most joyful people on the planet.

In The Book of Joy, they look back on their long lives to answer a single burning question: How do we find joy in the fact of life’s inevitable suffering?

The Book of Joy is featured on Oprah’s Favorite Things list for 2016 and is an instant New York Times bestseller. Doug Abrams is the co-writer of The Book of Joy and he joins us. 

The Dalai Lama is taking an extremely long view when it comes to climate change.

Speaking Friday at Middlebury College, the Tibetan Buddhist leader and winner of the 1989 Nobel Peace Prize teased his audience by saying our crisis might crash into another crisis someday, but not to worry because it will take billions of years.

He pointed to recent findings that Mars is dry now but appears once to have had water on it.

He urged a crowd of about 2,800 to eliminate negative feelings like anger and jealousy and practice contentment.