David Nightingale

Commentary & Opinion
12:50 pm
Sat October 18, 2014

David Nightingale: Erwin Schroedinger (1889-1961)

When Schrodinger was a student in Vienna, Adolf Hitler, “twice rejected as an art student [ref.1, p.5], [and] having pawned his overcoat to buy bread and milk, was prowling about the snowy streets ... trying to sell... pictures of Viennese churches...” [Ref.1, p.5]

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Commentary & Opinion
12:53 pm
Sun October 5, 2014

David Nightingale: Some Roman Writings

When Julius Caesar marauded his way across Europe and England, with his legions and wooden boats, shields and swords and arrows, he later wrote much of these adventures down, either on papyrus scrolls or wax, but although the mighty Roman Empire was formed from barbaric warfare and killing, there were many Romans constructing bridges and aqueducts, poems and books. Much of this is still in evidence today – for example, the aqueducts feeding Rome, and the writings of the likes of Ovid and Catullus and Pliny.

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Commentary & Opinion
3:52 pm
Thu September 11, 2014

David Nightingale: Caesar's invasions Of England

When Julius Caesar attacked England he described the Brits as (quote) “...barbarians... with long hair … who shave their bodies except for head and lip … paint themselves with (dark blue) woad... and groups of 10 or 12 share their wives... offspring being held to be the children of him to whom the maiden was brought first...” [ref.1, pp.153-154].

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Commentary & Opinion
12:52 pm
Sun August 31, 2014

David Nightingale: August 2014

It's still summer time, but there've been a few unwelcome yellow leaves in our road.

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Commentary & Opinion
3:45 pm
Fri August 22, 2014

David Nightingale: Marcus Aurelius (121-180)

Little the life each lives,” wrote Marcus Aurelius, “little the corner of the earth he lives in, little even the longest fame hereafter, and even that dependent on a succession of poor mortals, who will very soon be dead, and have not learnt to know themselves much less the man who was dead long years ago...” [Ref.1, p.599.]

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Commentary & Opinion
12:54 pm
Sun August 10, 2014

David Nightingale: J.Willard Gibbs (1839-1903)

J.W. Gibbs

Josiah Willard Gibbs was a contemporary of Mark Twain, and while Walt Whitman was enjoying the popularity of “Leaves of Grass”, and Dickens' final and unfinished novel “Edwin Drood” had just been published, J.Willard Gibbs was quietly working single-handedly at Yale on subjects that benefit mankind even today. This complex work, however, is not commonly known to a large segment of the reading public.

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Commentary & Opinion
12:50 pm
Sun July 27, 2014

David Nightingale: Gabriel Garcia Marquez

What better, for summer reading, than the writer Gabriel Garcia Marquez?

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Commentary & Opinion
12:50 pm
Sun July 13, 2014

David Nightingale: Fighting & Faiths

  As astronauts look down on a bright blue-and-white ball, seeing our unique yet fragile home, they don't see, of course, a color map of the world's religions. With night and day passing every 88 minutes, they observe tranquil areas, typhoons, flooded areas, possibly occasional volcanoes – beauty and trouble that nature deals us, and about which we can do nothing.

The colors on a religious color map of the globe shows all of the Americas plus Russia as Christian (pale yellow) and, in green, most of north Africa and the Middle East plus Indonesia as Islamic.

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Commentary & Opinion
12:50 pm
Sat June 28, 2014

David Nightingale: Jonas Waldo Smith

The Chief Engineer on the Catskill Aqueduct was Jonas Waldo Smith, born in 1861 in Lincoln, Massachusetts.

Now 2000 years ago, Sextus Julius Frontinus–one-time governor of the minor Roman province of Britain–had been appointed (in his retirement) Water Commissioner for the city of Rome. This was a position of consular rank that entailed responsibility for all Rome's water, conveyed into the capital via half a dozen major aqueducts, like Aqua Marcia, Aqua Claudia, and others.

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Commentary & Opinion
12:50 pm
Sun June 15, 2014

David Nightingale: Metronidazole

The doctor wrote the prescription in that Sanskrit that pharmacists are fortunately familiar with, and I took it immediately to the drug store. The swelling on my nose had been pre-cancerous, and I didn't want to delay.

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