Forty years ago, when a young Ginny Gilder stood on the edge of Boston’s Charles River and first saw a rowing shell in motion, it was love at first sight. Yearning to escape her family history, which included her mother’s emotional unraveling and her father’s singular focus on investment acumen as the ultimate trophy, Gilder discovered rowing at a pivotal moment in her life.

Having grown up in an era when girls were only beginning to abandon the sidelines as observers and cheerleaders to become competitors and national champions, Gilder harbored no dreams of athletic stardom. Once at Yale, however, her operating assumptions changed nearly overnight when, as a freshman in 1975, she found her way to the university’s rowing tanks in the gymnasium’s cavernous basement.

Course Correction: A Story of Rowing and Resilience in the Wake of Title IX recounts the physical and psychological barriers Gilder overcame as she transformed into an elite athlete who reached the highest echelon of her sport and recounts lessons learned from her journey.

In 2006, Jamie Tworkowski wrote a story called “To Write Love on Her Arms” about helping a friend through her struggle with drug addiction, depression, and self-injury. The piece was so hauntingly beautiful that it quickly went viral, giving birth to a non-profit organization of the same name.

Nine years later, "To Write Love on Her Arms" is a leader in suicide prevention and serves as a source of hope, encouragement, and resources for people worldwide. Now, Jamie’s writing is available in book form.

The new book is: If You Feel Too Much: Thoughts on Things Found and Lost and Hoped For which is a celebration of hope, wonder, and what it means to be human. Jamie Tworkowski is the founder of To Write Love on Her Arms, a nonprofit movement dedicated to presenting hope and finding help for people struggling with depression, addiction, self-injury, and thoughts of suicide.

4/1/15 Panel

Apr 1, 2015

  The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Today's panelists are WAMC's Alan Chartock, SUNY Albany Journalism Professor and Investigative Professor, Rosemary Armao, and WAMC newsman, Ray Graf.

Scheduled topics include: Bills on ‘Religious Freedom’ in Arkansas and Indiana; Lufthansa knew of Andreas Lubitz's ‘severe depression;' Nuclear talks with Iran; New Ethics Disclosure Rules for New York Legislators; Trevor Noah Backlash.

  In her latest novel, After Birth, Elisa Albert writes about motherhood and friendship. The book tells the story of Ari who lives in a town in upstate New York and is supposed to be working on a Ph.D. in women’s studies but she has major postpartum depression.

The book issues a wake-up call to a culture that turns its new mothers into exiles and expects them to act like natives.

3/27/15 Panel

Mar 27, 2015

  The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Today's panelists are WAMC's Alan Chartock, Kingston Freeman Publisher Emeritus and SUNY Albany Journalism Professor and Investigative Reporter, Rosemary Armao.

Scheduled topics include: Harry Reid won't seek re-election; Germanwings co-pilot update; police brutality in Detroit; Egypt to Yemen; NYC Building Collapse; Downton Abbey to end.

Can leading a sedentary lifestyle contribute to depression?

Dr. Nancy Low, assistant professor in the department of psychiatry at McGill University, is studying the correlation between these two afflictions.

Nancy Low is an Assistant Professor of Psychiatry at McGill University, Clinician-Researcher at the Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre (MUHC), and Staff Physician in the Mood Disorders Program of the McGill University Health Centre (MUHC).

How does depression affect one's personal goals?

Joanne Dickson, research director on the Doctorate of Clinical Psychology Programme in the Institute of Psychology, Health and Society at the University of Liverpool, surveyed the personal goals of people with depression and people who have never suffered from the mood disorder to study the results.

    Nearly every depressed person is assured by doctors, well-meaning friends and family, the media, and ubiquitous advertisements that the underlying problem is a chemical imbalance. Such a simple defect should be fixable, yet despite all of the resources that have been devoted to finding a pharmacological solution, depression remains stubbornly widespread. Why are we losing this fight?


  Rob Delaney: Mother. Wife. Sister. Human. Warrior. Falcon. Yardstick. Turban. Cabbage. is the title of the stand-up comedian’s tell-all-or-most memoir. In it, he vividly shares stories of his childhood, depression, alcoholism (he’s now more than 11 years sober), and that time he put an egg in a microwave.

Rob Delaney is one of the rare people whose time spent on Twitter has helped his career. Before he was making money as a comedian, he was sending out 140 character or less jokes like “Imagine a shark. Terrified yet? Well you will be when I tell you that THE SHARK IS MADE OF GLUTEN!” and “The hour I lose from daylight savings time will now be multiplied by 6 as I try to change the time on the clock in my car.” and many others not exactly suitable for radio.

His twitter-persona is primarily brash, irreverent, and fearless. His memoir is funny - but also stuffed with thoughtful reflections on too-real experiences. And then - as you can count on from any good comedian - funny again.

Listener Essay - Recovery Letter

Nov 5, 2013

  Beth Manion is a mental health advocate, writer and public speaker whose work focuses on increasing awareness of issues surrounding mental illness.  She is a member of Board of Directors of The National Alliance on Mental Illness of Western Massachusetts.