diet

We’re constantly warned about the dangers of being overweight or obese; even the government has proclaimed a war on obesity, demanding that steps be taken to end the epidemic. Our society glorifies the slender and super-fit and our concerns over body image boosts a $54 billion diet industry. Yet, according to the new science of obesity, the lean models and the mean athletes may be heading to an early grave.

In his new book, The Obesity Paradox: When Thinner Means Sicker and Heavier Means Healthier, cardiologist and researcher, Carl J. Lavie, reveals the truth behind body fat’s effect.

  Stacey Morris is a journalist and food writer, who has been working in this region for many years. Her latest project is a cookbook-memoir, Clean Comfort, which tells the story of the author's rocky relationship with food, how the dieting hamster wheel ballooned her weight to 345 pounds, and how she ultimately made her way back to balance and sanity - while loving food.

http://www.pcrm.org/

  Milton R. Mills, M.D., serves as Associate Director of Preventive Medicine for the Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine, a North American group of doctors and laypersons dedicated to promoting improved health care, better and more appropriate nutrition, and higher standards in medical research.

Mid-Hudson Vegetarian Society and Hudson Valley Vegans will present Dr. Milton Mills in a talk at Rhinebeck Town Hall in Rhinebeck, NY this Saturday at 2pm. The presentation is entitled "What's Wrong With the Paleo Diet?"

 For the countless individuals seeking to maximize their health and who consider vitamins to be the keys to well-being, Catherine Price's new book: Vitamania offers some context by looking into the roots of America's ongoing nutritional confusion.

Price traveled to vitamin manufacturers and food laboratories and military testing kitchens—and dove into the history of nutritional science. Vitamania explores the history, science, hype, and future of nutrition.

  Gluten-free has gone far beyond trendiness. Although about 1% of the population suffers from celiac disease (the autoimmune condition which causes the immune system to attack the intestinal walls in response to consumption of gluten), up to 8 times more people may have sensitivity to the protein, or experience ill effects from related conditions, such as IBS and wheat allergy.

That translates to about 40 million Americans buying gluten-free products, a $4.2 billion market that continues to grow. Living gluten-free is a challenge and Jax Peters Lowell wrote a book on it 20-years ago and now that work has been revised. The book is: The Gluten-Free Revolution: Absolutely Everything You Need to Know about Losing the Wheat, Reclaiming Your Health, and Eating Happily Ever After.

  All her life, Andie Mitchell had eaten lustily and mindlessly. Food was her babysitter, her best friend, her confidant, and it provided a refuge from her fractured family. But when she stepped on the scale on her twentieth birthday and it registered a shocking 268 pounds, she knew she had to change the way she thought about food and herself; that her life was at stake.

In her new book: It Was Me All Along, Andie tells a story about much more than a woman who loves food and abhors her body. It is about someone who made changes when her situation seemed too far-gone and how she discovered balance in an off-kilter world.

    

  In The Big Fat Surprise: Why Butter, Meat and Cheese Belong in a Healthy Diet, investigative journalist Nina Teicholz reveals the unthinkable: that everything we thought we knew about dietary fat is wrong. She documents how the low-fat nutrition advice of the past sixty years has amounted to a vast uncontrolled experiment on the entire population, with disastrous consequences for our health.

For decades, we have been told that the best possible diet involves cutting back on fat, especially saturated fat, and that if we are not getting healthier or thinner it must be because we are not trying hard enough. But what if the low-fat diet is itself the problem? What if the very foods we’ve been denying ourselves—the creamy cheeses, the sizzling steaks—are themselves the key to reversing the epidemics of obesity, diabetes, and heart disease?

    In Rewire: Change Your Brain to Break Bad Habits, Overcome Addictions, Conquer Self-Destructive Behavior, renowned psychotherapist Richard O’Connor, PhD, reveals exactly why our bad habits die so hard. We have two brains—one a thoughtful, conscious, deliberative self, and the other an automatic self that makes most of our decisions without our attention. Using new research and knowledge about how the brain works, the book clears a path to lasting, effective change for bad behaviors.

WAMC photo by Dave Lucas

A new report from Feeding America shows 50 million Americans rely on food banks and 1 in 7 Americans face food insecurity. It also links substandard nutrition to health problems.

The report entitled "Hunger in America 2014" has revealed some startling statistics: One in seven Americans turns to a food bank for help, about 40 percent of whom have education beyond high school.

    

  Sure, sugar is in ice cream and cookies, but what scared Eve Schaub was the secret world of sugar--hidden in bacon, crackers, salad dressing, pasta sauce, chicken broth, and baby food.

With her eyes open by the work of obesity expert Dr. Robert Lustig and others, Eve challenged her husband and two school-age daughters to join her on a quest to eat no added sugar for an entire year.

Along the way, Eve uncovered the real costs of our sugar-heavy American diet--including diabetes, obesity, and increased incidences of health problems such as heart disease and cancer. Eve Schaub’s new book is Year of No Sugar.

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