director

Enrico Spada

  An imagined version of true events, Red Velvet is the story of Ira Aldridge, the first African-American actor to play Othello on the English stage in 1833. In the story lines are blurred between race, friendship, betrayal and art.

The powerful play is currently running at Shakespeare & Company in Lenox, MA and stars OBIE Award-winning actor John Douglas Thompson as Ira Aldridge. 

Red Velvet was written by Lolita Chakrabarti and directed at Shakespeare & Company by Daniela Varon.

  This week, Albany Civic Theater opens a production of Patrick Hamilton’s suspenseful drama, Angel Street.

Angel Street tells the story of the Manninghams who live on Angel Street in 19th Century London. As the curtain rises, all appears the essence of Victorian tranquility. It is soon apparent however, that Mr. Manningham, a suavely handsome man, is slowly, intentionally, driving his devoted wife, Bella, to the brink of insanity.

Inspector Rough from Scotland Yard is convinced that Manningham is a homicidal maniac.

Gradually the inspector restores Bella's confidence in herself and as the evidence against Manningham unfolds, theater goers are treated to some of the most brilliant, suspenseful sequences in modern theater

The production at Albany Civic Theater is directed by Jennifer Van Iderstyne who joins us now along with Kevin MacNamara who plays Jack Manningham in Angle Street and John Sutton who plays Inspector Rough.

  The New York New Work Theatre Festival brings aspiring playwrights and Broadway producers together in a room with new plays and musicals in an combination elimination-by-audience vote competition and workshop.

One show in this year's festival is Hotel California: The Musical. A half-hour version of a full-lengthy musical that tells a new story using the timeless music of The Eagles. Our friend Jayne Atkinson directs and performs in the piece and it is written by Denise Lynn McQueen.

Hotel California: The Musical will be performed on Monday, August 24 at 7 p.m. at The Elektra Theatre at the Times Square Arts Center in New York, NY.

The bewildering journey of finding love in the modern world sets the premise for Terrence McNally’s bittersweet comedy, Frankie And Johnny In the Clair de Lune. The show is running on the Berkshire Theatre Group’s Fitzpatrick Mainstage in Stockbridge, MA through August 22nd.

After a one-night rendezvous in Manhattan's West Side, Johnny, a compulsive, starry-eyed, short-order cook, is convinced he has found his life companion in Frankie, a wisecracking waitress.

Frankie’s poor history with men leaves her hesitant to commit, but as the night progresses, she lets her guard down and an unlikely romance begins to blossom.

The contemporary love story stars Angel Desai and Darren Pettie and is directed by Karen Allen.

  Hudson Valley Shakespeare Festival is presenting an adaptation of Homer’s epic An Iliad for one actor that is making the rounds in the Valley this August.

HVSF's first solo show stars Kurt Rhoads as the ageless Poet who unleashes the fury of an ancient story he has told for centuries - creating heroes and battles before our eyes, challenging us to contemplate both the heroism and horror of war.

The New York Times said this OBIE Award-winning play is "spellbinding...an age-old story that resonates with tragic meaning today."

The show is directed by Gaye Taylor Upchurch and features longtime HVSF actor Kurt Rhoads.

The show will be performed at Basilica Hudson on 8/16, on Bannerman Island on 8/22 and 8/23, and at the HVSF tent at Boscobel House and Gardens on 8/21 and 8/24.

  Now through August 2nd, New York Stage and Film and Vassar College’s Powerhouse theatre presents The Light Years, a new play by award-winning play-making company The Debate Society.

Spanning 40 years and set at the Chicago World’s Fair, The Light Years has been developed over several years through the unique collaboration process The Debate Society Members writer/performer Hannah Bos, writer/performer Paul Thureen, and director/developer Oliver Butler.

Oliver Butler’s recent directing credits include Will Eno’s The Open House at the Signature Theatre Company - for which he won an OBIE Award for Direction; the New York City Center Encores! Off-Center production of Jonathan Larson’s Tick, Tick, Boom starring Lin-Manuel Miranda, Leslie Odom Jr. and Karen Olivo and the world premieres of Daniel Goldfarb’s Legacy at the Williamstown Theatre Festival - which was part on their Nikos Stage mere days ago.

He joins us to talk about The Light Years, what is required from a director for a quick switch between projects, and audiences' intense reaction to musicals.

Tony-Award winner Ruben Santiago-Hudson was at The Williamstown Theatre Festival in 2002 with his amazing one-man show, Lackawanna Blues. He returns to WTF this summer directing Blair Underwood, De’Adre Aziza, and Andre Holland in the world premiere of Paradise Blue - a drama from Dominique Morisseau.

Blue (Underwood), a gifted trumpeter, contemplates selling his once-vibrant jazz club in Detroit’s Blackbottom neighborhood to shake free the demons of his past and better his life. But where does that leave his devoted Pumpkin, who has dreams of her own?

http://www.broadwayworld.com/

  New York Stage and Film and Vassar College's first Powerhouse mainstage show of this summer is Keith Byunin's The Unbuilt City. The production opened last night and runs through July 12th.

The show stars Beth Dixon and Carter Hudson and is directed by Tony Award nominee, Sean Mathias.

Writer, actor, and director, Sean Mathias directed the film Bent and numerous acclaimed plays all over the world - including London, New York City, Cape Town, Sydney, and Los Angeles.

  Thoreau or, Return to Walden is a world premiere play running at the Berkshire Theatre Group’s Unicorn Theatre in Stockbridge.

Longtime BTG Alum, David Adkins takes the stage as transcendentalist, poet, and philosopher, Henry David Thoreau. BTG Artist, Eric Hill, who most recently wrote and directed Adkins in the wildly well-received Poe, is directing this production.

The writing of Henry David Thoreau comes to life in this dramatic and uplifting tale as he battles with himself, with his own thirst for blood and for the soul of our American conscience.

We are joined by David Adkins.

roundabouttheatre.org

  In Joshua Harmon’s new play, Significant Other, Jordan Berman would love to be in love, but until he meets Mr. Right, he wards off lonely nights with his trio of close-knit girlfriends. But as singles’ nights turn into bachelorette parties, Jordan finds that supporting the ones you love can be just as impossible as finding love itself. The play takes an often funny and alternately heartbreaking look at what it’s like to be single when all of your close friends are marrying themselves off (and even worse than that - sometimes having destination weddings that you attend, even though it destroys your budget).

The Roundabout Theatre Company production of Significant Other, directed by Trip Cullman, has been in previews for a few weeks and officially opens at The Laura Pels Theatre in New York City this coming Thursday night.

Roundabout Theatre Company’s relationship with Joshua Harmon began when his play Bad Jews was selected for the inaugural Roundabout Underground Reading Series for Emerging Playwrights in February 2012. The play then premiered at Roundabout Underground’s Black Box in Fall 2012, in a sold-out extended run and then moved upstairs to the 420-seat Laura Pels Theatre - where Significant Other is performed now.

We spoke with Joshua Harmon and Trip Cullman recently about Roundabout, the play, and working together.

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