discrimination

  In 2006, Tavis Smiley teamed up with other leaders in the Black community to create a national plan of action to address the ten most crucial issues facing African Americans. 

The Covenant with Black America, which became a #1 New York Times bestseller, ran the gamut from health care to criminal justice, affordable housing to education, voting rights to racial divides. But a decade later, Black men still fall to police bullets and brutality, Black women still die from preventable diseases, Black children still struggle to get a high quality education, the digital divide and environmental inequality still persist, and American cities from Ferguson to Baltimore burn with frustration. In short, the last decade has seen the evaporation of Black wealth, with Black fellow citizens having lost ground in nearly every leading economic category.

  During World War II, trains delivered thousands of civilians from the United States and Latin America to Crystal City, Texas. The trains carried Japanese, German, and Italian immigrants and their American-born children. The only family internment camp during the war, Crystal City was the center of a government prisoner exchange program called “quiet passage.” Hundreds of prisoners in Crystal City were exchanged for other more ostensibly important Americans—diplomats, businessmen, soldiers, and missionaries—behind enemy lines in Japan and Germany.

Jan Jarboe Russell writes about Crystal City in her book, The Train to Crystal City: FDR's Secret Prisoner Exchange Program and America's Only Family Internment Camp During World War II, now out in paperback.

wikipedia.org

The city of Rutland has settled a racial discrimination lawsuit filed by a former police officer for $975,000.

  Prohibition has long been portrayed as a “noble experiment” that failed, a newsreel story of glamorous gangsters, flappers, and speakeasies. In The War on Alcohol: Prohibition and the Rise of the American State, Lisa McGirr dismantles this cherished myth to reveal a much more significant history.

Prohibition was the seedbed for a pivotal expansion of the federal government, the genesis of our contemporary penal state and shows how the war on alcohol was waged disproportionately in African American, immigrant, and poor white communities. Alongside Jim Crow and other discriminatory laws, Prohibition brought coercion into everyday life and even into private homes. Its targets coalesced into an electoral base of urban, working-class voters that propelled FDR to the White House.

A New York congressman and state attorney general are pledging to push for coordinated federal and state response to allegations of religious discrimination and bullying in a school district in the Hudson Valley.

Jūsų Darbas/Wikimedia Commons Public Domain

Mayors across the country are commemorating the civil rights movement and the 50th anniversary of the 16th Street Baptist Church in Birmingham Alabama by adopting a 10 point Plan of Action to end racism and discrimination. Burlington, Vermont is among the cities stepping up to participate.

Humor in the media; hurftul or helpful?

Mar 16, 2013
Wikimedia Commons/Zakir Suleman

Studies have shown that laughter is good for your health, but what about when it comes at the expense of others.

The U.S. Justice Department has reached a proposed agreement with a Connecticut city to resolve allegations that police engaged in a pattern of discrimination against Latinos.

Federal officials said Tuesday that East Haven Mayor Joseph Maturo Jr. has outlined plans that will lead to broad changes to the police department's policies and practices. Maturo is seeking approval from town officials to enter the binding agreement.

WAMC

Civil rights authorities say they've seen a serious uptick in housing discrimination complaints in Massachusetts.  Its further fall out from the foreclosure crisis.  WAMC's Pioneer Valley Bureau Chief Paul Tuthill reports.