doctor

When our tech guru, Jesse Feiler is here – we talk quite a bit about Apple Technologies. This morning we are going to focus on news from Microsoft.

Jesse is a developer, consultant, and author specializing in Apple technologies. He is the creator of Minutes Machine for iPad, the meeting management app and Saranac River Trail app a guide to the Trail that includes location-based updates as well as social media tools.

  Are children and adolescents being silenced and their growth stunted in the age of quick diagnoses and overmedication?

In The Silenced Child, Dr. Claudia Gold shows the tremendous power of listening in parent/child and doctor/patient relationships.

Claudia Gold, MD practices behavioral pediatrics in Great Barrington, MA. The author of Keeping Your Child In Mind, her articles on behavioral and mental health issues, in print and online, are widely followed. She is a graduate of the scholar’s program of the Berkshire Psychoanalytic Institute, and of the UMass Boston Infant-Parent Mental Health Fellowship.

New York Oncology Hematology is hosting the Spring to Life Conference on Hematologic Malignances on Saturday, April 16th at the Hilton Albany Hotel.

This one-day conference includes a morning and afternoon session for physicians, nurses and health care providers. The morning session focuses on advancements in treatment of hematologic malignancies.

In the afternoon, the conference is open to the public, and focuses on living with cancer and blood disorders. Patients, survivors, family and caregivers are encouraged to attend. Session topics include managing a progressive illness, talking with a family member about an advancing disease and a Q&A session with audience participation.

Dr. Ira Zackon is the Director of the NYOH Stem Cell Transplant Program and is conference chair and we welcome him to the show this morning.

Also joining us, Barbara Cantave - Multiple Myeloma Survivor and patient of Dr. Zackon at New York Oncology Hematology and Stem Cell Transplant Recipient, through NYOH.

  There are 13 million people with cancer in the United States, and it’s estimated that about 1.3 million of these cases are hereditary. Yet despite advanced training in cancer genetics and years of practicing medicine, Dr. Theo Ross was never certain whether the history of cancers in her family was simple bad luck or a sign that they were carriers of a cancer-causing genetic mutation. Then she was diagnosed with melanoma, and for someone with a dark complexion, melanoma made no sense. It turned out there was a genetic factor at work.

Using her own family’s story, the latest science of cancer genetics, and her experience as a practicing physician, Ross shows how to spot the patterns of inherited cancer, how to get tested for cancer-causing genes, and what to do if you have one. Theo Ross’s new book is: A Cancer in the Family. 

  In The Brain That Changes Itself, Norman Doidge described the most important breakthrough in our understanding of the brain in four hundred years: the discovery that the brain can change its own structure and function in response to mental experience—what we call neuroplasticity.

His new book, The Brain's Way of Healing: Remarkable Discoveries and Recoveries from the Frontiers of Neuroplasticity ,shows how the amazing process of neuroplastic healing really works.

When Breath Becomes Air

Jan 13, 2016

  At the age of thirty-six, on the verge of completing a decade’s worth of training as a neurosurgeon, Paul Kalanithi was diagnosed with stage IV lung cancer. One day he was a doctor treating the dying, and the next he was a patient struggling to live. And just like that, the future he and his wife had imagined evaporated.

When Breath Becomes Air chronicles Kalanithi’s transformation from a naïve medical student “possessed,” as he wrote, “by the question of what, given that all organisms die, makes a virtuous and meaningful life” into a neurosurgeon at Stanford working in the brain, the most critical place for human identity, and finally into a patient and new father confronting his own mortality.

We speak with Paul's wife, Lucy, about his book and his experience.

Courtesy of Little, Brown and Company

  Malcolm Gladwell has been a staff writer for The New Yorker since 1996. Previously he worked at The Washington Post.

He is the author of three New York Times best-sellers: The Tipping Point, Blink, and Outliers; a collection of his New Yorker articles titled What the Dog Saw and most recently, David and Goliath

This episode was recorded live at The White Hart Inn in Salisbury, CT and presented by Oblong Books and Music. 

 As a young medical student, Dr. David Casarett was inspired by the story of a two-year-old girl named Michelle Funk. Michelle fell into a creek and was underwater for over an hour. When she was found she wasn’t breathing, and her pupils were fixed and dilated. That drowning should have been fatal. But after three hours of persistent work, a team of doctors and nurses was able to bring her back. It was a miracle.

If Michelle could come back after three hours of being dead, what about twelve hours? Or twenty-four? What would it take to revive someone who had been frozen for one thousand years? And what does blurring the line between “life” and “death” mean for society? In Shocked, Casarett chronicles his exploration of the cutting edge of resuscitation and reveals just how far science has come.

  When Damon Tweedy began medical school, he envisioned a bright future where his segregated, working-class background would become largely irrelevant.

Instead, he found that he had joined a new world where race is front and center. Black Man in a White Coat examines the complex ways in which both black doctors and patients must navigate the difficult and often contradictory terrain of race and medicine. As Tweedy transforms from student to practicing physician, he discovers how often race influences his encounters with patients.

columbia-lyme.org

Dr. Brian Fallon, Director of the Tick-Borne Disease Research Center at Columbia University, will be speaking on Friday at 7pm at Columbia-Greene Community College in Hudson, NY presented by The Cornell Cooperative Extension.

Dr. Brian Fallon is internationally renowned for his work on the neurologic and neuropsychiatric aspects of Lyme disease. Dr. Fallon’s work has also included diagnostics and treatment studies. The Columbia University Tick-borne Disease Research Center was established as the first academic research center in the country to focus multi disciplinary research on chronic Lyme disease.

Exercise Will Hurt You

Nov 25, 2014

  When was it decided that exercise could only be good for you? Leading neurosurgeon Dr. Steve Barrer argues, based on his extensive career treating exercise-related injuries, a cornucopia of his own personal injuries from exercise over the years, and ample scientific data, that we ought to change the way we think about exercise.

Instead of succumbing to what Barrer calls “the cult of exercise” that follows the mantra “no pain, no gain,” how about some common sense? His book is Exercise Will Hurt You.

      Peter Rhee is the trauma surgeon who helped save Congresswoman Gabby Giffords.

He has just written a memoir, Trauma Red: The Making Of A Surgeon In War And In America's Cities, about his upbringing in South Korea and Africa to the gripping dramas he faces in a typical day as a medical genius.

   

    We like to imagine that medicine is based on evidence and the results of fair testing and clinical trials. In reality, those tests and trials are often profoundly flawed. We like to imagine that doctors who write prescriptions for everything from antidepressants to cancer drugs to heart medication are familiar with the research literature about a drug, when in reality much of the research is hidden from them by drug companies.

With Ben Goldacre’s characteristic flair and a forensic attention to detail, Bad Pharma: How Drug Companies Mislead Doctors and Harm Patients reveals a shockingly broken system and calls for regulation. This is the pharmaceutical industry as it has never been seen before.

    San Francisco’s Laguna Honda Hospital is the last almshouse in the country, a descendant of the Hôtel-Dieu (God’s hotel) that cared for the sick in the Middle Ages. Ballet dancers and rock musicians, professors and thieves—“anyone who had fallen, or, often, leapt, onto hard times” and needed extended medical care—ended up here. So did Victoria Sweet, who came for two months and stayed for twenty years.

Laguna Honda, relatively low-tech but human-paced, gave Sweet the opportunity to practice a kind of attentive medicine that has almost vanished. Gradually, the place transformed the way she understood her work. Alongside the modern view of the body as a machine to be fixed, her extraordinary patients evoked an older idea, of the body as a garden to be tended. God’s Hotel tells their story and the story of the hospital itself, which, as efficiency experts, politicians, and architects descended, determined to turn it into a modern “health care facility,” revealed its own surprising truths about the essence, cost, and value of caring for the body and the soul.

  Dr. Richard Besser is chief medical editor at ABC News, and author of the new book Tell Me The Truth, Doctor: Easy-to-Understand Answers to Your Most Confusing and Critical Health Questions.

As an award-winning psychology instructor at Stanford University, as well as a health educator for the School of Medicine’s Health Improvement Program, Dr. Kelly McGonigal’s job is to help people manage stress and make positive changes in their lives. After years of watching people try to control their bodies, emotions, and choices, she realized that much of what they believed about willpower was sabotaging their success and creating unnecessary stress.

Dr. Patricia O’Gorman, Ph.D is an internationally-recognized psychologist in private practice in East Chatham, and Albany, New York, is noted for her work in families, children of alcoholics, trauma, child welfare, juvenile justice, mental health, and substance abuse.