Donald Trump

Stephen Gottlieb: Trump’s Audience

Aug 23, 2016

Behind Trump’s remarks and his imperviousness to criticism is the audience he’s after.

This is a picture of a tax return
Flickr

Two United States senators from opposite sides of the country are calling on Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump to release his tax returns. The staunch Democrats are also pushing legislation that would require it.

There’s more evidence that the Presidential race may be effecting which party controls the State Senate.

Donald Trump
Facebook: Donald J. Trump

Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump is bringing his campaign to Connecticut once again. Saturday's planned 7:30 p.m. rally at Sacred Heart University in Fairfield marks the first time the businessman has campaigned in the state since becoming the GOP's nominee.

  The culmination of nearly 30 years of reporting on Donald Trump, Pulitzer Prize-winning investigative reporter, David Cay Johnston, takes a revealingly close look at the mogul's rise to power and prominence in his new book, The Making of Donald Trump.

  It’s fair to say Melania Trump is not your typical would-be first lady.

In today’s Congressional Corner, Union College political science professor Brad Hays continues his discussion with WAMC’s Alan Chartock.

As Republican nominee Donald Trump begins his first full week campaigning for the presidency, his schedule indicates a stop in this region.

Paladino, Trump's NY Chair, Reflects On RNC

Jul 22, 2016

Now that Donald Trump has accepted the Republican Party's nomination for president, party officials and delegates are heading home to begin the sprint to election day. Trump's chairperson in New York is 2010 gubernatorial candidate Carl Paladino, who spoke with WAMC News on Friday about the GOP's chances to carry New York.

Donald Trump at the Flynn Theatre
Pat Bradley/WAMC

Donald Trump will formally accept the presidential nomination tonight at the Republican National Convention in Cleveland, and the New York delegation will be front and center. Jon Campbell, with the USA Today Network's Albany Bureau, spoke to WAMC News Thursday after the New York delegation breakfast and before tonight's big speech by Trump.

Gingrich: Do Not Assume Anyone Is Happy

Jul 18, 2016
Speaker Gingrich addresses New York delegates Monday.
Karen DeWitt

New York’s delegation at the Republican National Convention heard from former House Speaker Newt Gingrich at their breakfast meeting Monday, where Gingrich offered them a game plan for winning in  New York in November.

  Ever since Donald Trump entered the presidential race—in a press conference attended by paid actors, in which he slandered Mexican immigrants—he has dominated headlines, becoming the unrestrained id at the center of one of the most bizarre and alarming elections in American history.

It was not always so. In 1996, longtime New Yorker writer Mark Singer was conscripted by his editor to profile Donald Trump. At that time Trump was a mere Manhattan-centric megalomaniac, a failing casino operator mired in his second divorce and (he claimed) recovering from the bankruptcy proceedings that prompted him to inventory the contents of his Trump Tower home. 

In Trump and Me, Singer revisits the profile and recounts how its publication lodged inside its subject’s head as an enduring irritant—and how Singer (“A TOTAL LOSER!” according to Trump) cheerfully continued to bait him.

As anyone who listens to my commentaries or reads some of my opinion pieces likely suspects, I tend to fall on the liberal side of the political spectrum. That said, next week I will definitely be watching the political three-ring circus that is the Republican National Convention.

  Trump and Clinton are getting most of the attention, but the entire House is up for grabs in November too.

In today’s Congressional Corner, Massachusetts Representative Richard Neal tells WAMC’s Alan Chartock whether he thinks the Democrats can retake control.

Michael Meeropol: Debunking Trump's Slogan

Jul 12, 2016

Do you know who Patrick Buchanan is?  In many ways, he is a former incarnation of Donald Trump as a presidential candidate.  He began his career as a political operative working for Richard Nixon, and became a well-known right-wing pundit on television in the 1970s before going to work in the Reagan White House during the 1980s.  In 1992, he challenged President George H.W. Bush in the Republican primaries.   In an attempt to build up Bush I’s bona fides with the right wing of the party (Reaganites mistrusted Bush I’s conservatism), Buchanan was given a prime time speaking slot at the 1992 Republican Convention.  In his speech he proclaimed that there was “culture war” in the United States. Bill and Hilary Clinton were identified with the “wrong side” and, in a backhanded compliment, Buchanan magnanimously proclaimed that “George Bush is on our side.” The negativity of the speech and the attempted demonization of the Clintons and the “side” of various issues they presumably represented caused some commentators to snarkily remark that the speech sounded better “in the original German!”Like Trump, Buchanan preached divisiveness and attacked the Republican establishment.  In 2000 he actually ran for President on a third party ticket.

Leaders of the tribe that owns the Foxwoods Resort Casino in Connecticut are speaking out over past remarks by Donald Trump that they describe as bigoted, and current campaign rallies they say disrespect Native Americans.

  Donald Trump has a big choice to make.

In today’s Congressional Corner, Congressional Quarterly’s David Hawkings and WAMC’s Alan Chartock continue their discussion about the veepstakes.

  A year ago, the notion of a Donald Trump White House was little more than a lark. Things have changed.

In today’s Congressional Corner, New York Representative Paul Tonko — a Democrat from the 20th district — talks politics with WAMC’s Alan Chartock. 

Rob Edelman: Donald Trump, Screen Personality

Jun 13, 2016

As we all know, Ronald Reagan was a movie actor before he became the California governor and the United States president. Donald Trump, the billionaire businessman-turned Republican Party presidential contender, has never been toplined onscreen but, for decades, he’s been a celebrity, a recognizable face and name. And so for decades, he’s been directly referenced in film and TV scripts. He’s made cameo appearances onscreen. Plus, even one rather infamous screen villain is based on The Donald.

6/1/16 Panel

Jun 1, 2016

  The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Stephen Gottlieb: Suckers For Trump

May 31, 2016

Let me begin by reminding you of Trump’s claims,[1] and end with some questions.

  2016 is taking a turn toward the general election.

In today’s Congressional Corner, New York representative Sean Patrick Maloney tells WAMC’s Alan Chartock he can’t rule out a Donald Trump White House. 

Bill Owens: The Trump VP Sweepstakes

May 12, 2016

Audio Pending...

The sweep by Donald Trump of the last six primaries (and Cruz and Kasich's suspensions) portends a Trump nomination in Cleveland. The next big question is what Republican (and that in itself may be an assumption, based upon Ben Carson’s recent comments) will want to put his or her chips on the table to see if Donald picks them up? (A side note: Were the campaign suspensions evidence of lingering hope?)

  Sidney Blumenthal's A Self-Made Man: The Political Life of Abraham Lincoln Vol. I, 1809 - 1849 is the first of a multi-volume history of Lincoln as a political genius - from his obscure beginnings to his presidency, assassination, and the overthrow of his post-Civil War dreams of Reconstruction. This volume traces Lincoln from his painful youth, describing himself as “a slave,” to his emergence as the man we recognize as Abraham Lincoln.

From his youth as a “newsboy,” a voracious newspaper reader, Lincoln became a free thinker, reading Tom Paine, as well as Shakespeare and the Bible, and studying Euclid to sharpen his arguments as a lawyer.

Lincoln’s anti-slavery thinking began in his childhood amidst the Primitive Baptist antislavery dissidents in backwoods Kentucky and Indiana, the roots of his repudiation of Southern Christian pro-slavery theology. Intensely ambitious, he held political aspirations from his earliest years.

Herbert London: Trump Foreign Policy

May 11, 2016

Now that Trump is the presumptive Republican candidate for president, a review of his recent foreign policy position seems warranted. Trump played his presidential “part” well, to paraphrase his newly appointed aide, Charlie Manaford in a speech that was a serious attempt to articulate his foreign policy stance.

Donald Trump at the Flynn Theatre
Pat Bradley/WAMC

Democratic presidential hopeful Hillary Clinton is refusing to respond to Republican Donald Trump's recent comments that she was an "enabler" of Bill Clinton's marital infidelities during his political career.

Michael Meeropol: Of Trump And The Bernie Vote

May 6, 2016

My wife, Annie, and I just spent a couple of weeks in Europe.  Virtually every European we met asked us incredulously, “are we looking at a President Trump?”This was particularly true in Great Britain which recently debated keeping him out of the country because he is a purveyor of hatred. Returning home we were confronted with headlines that suggested the possibility that Trump could pick up some Bernie Sanders supporters because both men are “anti-establishment” and oppose “bad” trade deals that cost American jobs.

A new Siena College poll released this morning — the same day of former state Assembly Speaker Sheldon Silver's sentencing — finds corruption the most pressing issue among New York residents.

  The governor of Massachusetts is no fan of Donald Trump.

In today’s Congressional Corner, Tim Vercellotti, director of the Western New England University poll and professor of political science, continues his conversation with WAMC’s Alan Chartock. 


Presidential candidate, Donald Trump visited Plattsburgh, N.Y. on Friday, April 15th.  Fortunately, I was out of town.

pixabay.com

A 20-year-old Connecticut man is facing charges after authorities say he tweeted out a bomb threat during a Donald Trump rally Saturday.

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