downton abbey

Audrey Kupferberg: Downton Abbey Actors In Other Roles

Mar 18, 2016

Now that the final episode of DOWNTON ABBEY has aired and been discussed over tea, on social media, and at the dinner table, it is time for fans to move on.  However, for many avid followers, separation anxiety has set in.  For those people, here are a few suggestions which may not bring you to the satisfaction of a Sunday with the Crawley clan, but could result in some fine entertainment.

3/27/15 Panel

Mar 27, 2015

  The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Today's panelists are WAMC's Alan Chartock, Kingston Freeman Publisher Emeritus and SUNY Albany Journalism Professor and Investigative Reporter, Rosemary Armao.

Scheduled topics include: Harry Reid won't seek re-election; Germanwings co-pilot update; police brutality in Detroit; Egypt to Yemen; NYC Building Collapse; Downton Abbey to end.

  From the immense staff running a lavish Edwardian estate and the lonely maid-of-all-work cooking in a cramped middle-class house to the poor child doing chores in a slightly less poor household, servants were essential to the British way of life. They were hired not only for their skills but also to demonstrate the social standing of their employers—even as they were required to tread softly and blend into the background. More than simply the laboring class serving the upper crust—as popular culture would have us believe—they were a diverse group that shaped and witnessed major changes in the modern home, family, and social order.

Lucy Lethbridge explores the servants' stories in her book, Servants: A Downstairs History of Britain from the Nineteenth Century to Modern Times.

Working mainly in television, director Brian Percival has made quite a name for himself in the UK with his work on Downton Abbey extending his reach to this side of the Atlantic.

Percival’s debut theatrical feature The Book Thief is generating early buzz as a contender in the upcoming Hollywood award season. The film will screen as part of the FilmColumbia Festival this Sunday at 3:30pm.

With Downton Abbey is all the Public Television rage, the book – To Marry an English Lord is back in print and being lauded as source material by the show’s creator, Julian Fellowes.

Julian Fellowes, creator of the PBS smash Downton Abbey, received the 2012 Edith Wharton Lifetime Achievement Award in Boston on Saturday. But, he extended his first trip to the Bay State by one day to have time to visit The Mount in Lenox. We met up with him there and spoke with him about Wharton and his work.