drought

From the California drought, to the Oroville Dam flood, to the drilling of the Dakota Access Pipeline - environmental and humanitarian issues are at the forefront of conversation as the new administration takes the helm.

Water problems in the Western United States are just the tip of the iceberg, and they can seem tantalizingly easy to solve: just turn off the fountains at the Bellagio, stop selling hay to China, ban golf, cut down the almond trees, and remove the lawyers the equation.

In Where The Water Goes: Life And Death Along The Colorado RiverNew Yorker writer David Owen takes a closer look at a vast man-made ecosystem around the Colorado River that is far more complex and interesting than the headlines let on. 

tap water
William Warby, flickr

The drought has prompted a municipal water system in the southern Vermont town of Dorset to shut off its water supply at night until further notice.

  Water scarcity is on everyone's mind. Long taken for granted, water availability has entered the realm of economics, politics, and people's food and lifestyle choices. But as anxiety mounts - even as a swath of California farmland has been left fallow and extremist groups worldwide exploit the desperation of people losing livelihoods to desertification - many are finding new routes to water security with key implications for food access, economic resilience, and climate change.

Water does not perish, nor require millions of years to form as do fossil fuels. However, water is always on the move. In Water in Plain Sight, Judith D. Schwartz presents a refreshing perspective on water that transcends zero-sum thinking.

wikipedia

Authorities say much of the Northeast is experiencing drought conditions, with sections of New York and Massachusetts among the driest.

Bill Owens: Drought Versus Abundance

Apr 30, 2015

News stories over the past several weeks have raised awareness of extremely serious drought over the southwestern United States; with particularly dire forecasts for California.  NASA scientists and other experts predict that the condition will persist over decades, and that larger sections of the country will be affected. The northeast, however, will also likely experience more moisture.  Hopefully, it won’t all fall as snow along the northeast coast!

4/6/15 Panel

Apr 6, 2015

  The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Today's panelists are WAMC's Alan Chartock, SUNY Albany Journalism Professor and Investigative Professor, Rosemary Armao, and political consultant, Libby Post.

Scheduled topics include Rolling Stone retracts rape story; President Obama makes his case for Iran Nuclear Deal; Chinese women's rights activists arrested; and California drought.

A study says summer drought in New England is unlikely despite a warm winter and little snow that sent far less water than usual tumbling into streams and rivers.

The U.S. Geological Survey says summer rains play a bigger role than winter snow in feeding waterways.

The study also links stream flows to climate. It said temperatures have been rising for half a century, causing snowpack to melt earlier, which in turn leads to most runoff early in the season.