education

Tara Westover’s memoir, “Educated,” has made its way to the number one spot on the New York Times bestsellers list.

She tells her story of being a young girl who, kept out of school, leaves her survivalist family and goes on to earn a PhD from Cambridge University.

Dr. Menhaz Afridi is an Associate Professor of Religious studies and Director of Holocaust, Genocide, and Interfaith Education Center at Manhattan College. She is committed to interfaith, and the Holocaust education. She teaches contemporary Islam, Holocaust, Genocide and issues of gender within Islam. 

She will join the Sidney and Beatrice Albert Inter-Faith Lectureship Program at The College of St. Rose next Tuesday, April 17 to present a lecture entitled “The Rise of Anti-Semitism and Islamophobia: Solutions and Challenges.”

For decades now, American voters have been convinced to support public policies that only benefit those in power. But how do the powerful extract consent from citizens whose own self-interest and collective well-being are constantly denied? And why do so many Americans seem to have given up on quality public education, on safe food and safe streets, on living wages - even on democracy itself?

"Kill It to Save It" lays bare the hypocrisy of contemporary US political discourse, documenting the historical and theoretical trajectory of capitalism’s triumph over democracy.

Corey Dolgon is professor of sociology and director of community-based learning at Stonehill College in Easton, Massachusetts.

a piglet
Hancock Shaker Village Facebook page

It may not feel like spring has sprung – but it is nearly time for a major regional spring event: Baby Animals at Hancock Shaker Village in Pittsfield, Massachusetts.

On April 14, Hancock Shaker Village will begin welcoming visitors to visit their newly restored silos, Dairy Ell, and Round Stone Barn – which will be full of lambs, piglets, calves, chicks, and kids through May 6.

We are joined by Hancock Shaker Village’s Director of Facilities and Farm Billy Mangiardi and Director of Education Cindy Dickinson.

Phil Scott
WAMC/Pat Bradley

Vermont Gov. Phil Scott says experience in education isn't necessarily a requirement for the state's next secretary of education.

It is probably safe to say, parents everywhere are deeply concerned about the education of their children, especially now, when education has become a minefield of politics and opposing views.

Ken Robinson, one of the world's most influential educators, has had countless conversations with parents about the dilemmas they face with regard to finding the best school, teacher and curriculum for their child. His new book, "You, Your Child, And School: Navigating Your Way to the Best Education," guides parents with prescriptive and sometimes controversial advice on how to help their children get the education they need and deserve.

Sir Ken Robinson is an internationally recognized leader in the development of creativity, innovation, and human potential. For twelve years, he was professor of education at the University of Warwick in the UK and is now professor emeritus.

Former Internet entrepreneur Andrew Keen was among the earliest to write about the dangers that the Internet poses to our culture and society. His 2007 book "The Cult of the Amateur" was critical in helping advance the conversation around the Internet, which has now morphed from a tool providing efficiencies and opportunities for consumers and business to an elemental force that is profoundly reshaping our societies and our world.

In his new book, "How to Fix the Future," Keen focuses on what we can do about this seemingly intractable situation. Looking to the past to learn how we might change our future, he describes how societies tamed the excesses of the Industrial Revolution, which, like its digital counterpart, demolished long-standing models of living, ruined harmonious environments, and altered the business world beyond recognition.

Brad Meltzer is the New York Times bestselling author of "Heroes for My Son, Heroes for My Daughter," and a number of suspense novels. He's the creator of the childrens' book series "Ordinary People Change the World" which is illustrated by Christopher Eliopoulos. Meltzer is also the host of the History Channel television shows "Brad Meltzer's Decoded" and "Brad Meltzer's Lost History."

His joined us to discuss both "I am Harriet Tubman" from the Ordinary People series and his newest suspense novel, "The Escape Artist."

  Jonathan Starr, once a cutthroat hedge fund manager, is not your traditional do-gooder, and in 2009, when he decided to found Abaarso, a secondary school in Somaliland, the choice seemed crazy to even his closest friends. “Why,” they wondered, “would he turn down a life of relative luxury to relocate to an armed compound in a breakaway region of the world’s #1 failed state?” To achieve his mission, Starr would have to overcome profound cultural differences, broken promises, and threats to his safety and that of his staff.

It Takes a School is the story of how an abstract vision became a transformative reality, as Starr set out to build a school in a place forgotten by the world. It is the story of a skeptical and clan-based society learning to give way to trust. And it’s the story of the students themselves, including a boy from a family of nomads who took off on his own in search of an education and a girl who waged a hunger strike in order to convince her strict parents to send her to Abaarso.

Today’s students face a challenging paradox: the digital tools they need to complete their work are often the source of their biggest distractions. Students can quickly become overwhelmed trying to manage the daily confluence of online interactions with schoolwork, extracurricular activities, and family life. Written by author and educator Ana Homayoun, "Social Media Wellness" is the first book to successfully decode the new language of social media for parents and educators and provide pragmatic solutions to help students focus and manage distractions. 

Ana Homayoun is a noted teen and millennial expert, author, school consultant, speaker and educator. Her newest book is "Social Media Wellness: Helping Tweens and Teens Thrive in an Unbalanced Digital World."

From an award-winning, “meticulously observant” (The New Yorker) writer, Helen Thorpe, comes a powerful and moving account of how refugee teenagers at a Denver public high school learn English and become Americans.

The Newcomers follows the lives of twenty-two immigrant teenagers throughout the course of the 2015-2016 school year as they land at South High School in Denver, Colorado, in an English Language Acquisition class created specifically for them. Speaking no English, unfamiliar with American culture, their stories are poignant and remarkable as they face the enormous challenge of adapting. These newcomers, from fourteen to nineteen years old, come from nations convulsed by drought or famine or war. Many come directly from refugee camps, after experiencing dire forms of cataclysm. Some arrive alone, having left or lost every other member of their original family.

Helen Thorpe is an award-winning journalist who lives in Denver, Colorado. Her journalism has appeared in The New York Times Magazine, The New Yorker, Texas Monthly, and 5280.

Lucas Willard / WAMC

New York Lieutenant Governor Kathy Hochul stopped in Saratoga Springs today to speak to educators and students about the importance of Science Technology Engineering and Math, or STEM, learning. 

It’s hard to imagine a country without Medicare, Medicaid, public television and radio, voting rights, integrated schools and hospitals, federal funding for K-12 education, environmental and consumer protections. Yet, according to our next guest, this political inheritance is today under siege.

In his new book, "Building The Great Society: Inside Lyndon Johnson’s White House," Politico Magazine contributing editor Joshua Zeitz shares how Lyndon Johnson and his White House aides built the Great Society and what can be lost in throwing it away.

Our "Falling into Place" series spotlights the important work of -and fosters collaboration between- not-for-profit organizations in our communities; allowing us all to fall into place.

Falling Into Place is supported by The Seymour Fox Memorial Foundation, Providing a helping hand to turn inspiration into accomplishment. See more possibilities … see more promise … see more progress.

STARS Intergen Corp. provides opportunities for seniors in the towns of Bethlehem and Coeymans to enhance the educational experience for Ravina-Coeymens-Selkirk students. We are joined by Bill Schwartz, STARS Intergen's Board President and Linda S. Bruno, Executive Director.

Cathy N. Davidson is a lifelong educational innovator - and instigator. After twenty-five years as a professor and an administrator leading innovation at Duke University, Davidson moved to CUNY in August 2014 to direct the Futures Initiative at the Graduate Center. Appointed by President Obama to the National Council on the Humanities (2011-2017), she also sits on the Board of Directors of Mozilla. 

In her new book, The New Education, Davidson argues that the current approach to education is wholly unsuited to the era of the gig economy. Our system of higher education dates to the period from 1865 to 1925, when the nation's new universities created grades and departments, majors and minors, in an attempt to prepare young people for a world transformed by the telegraph and the Model T. From the Ivy League to community colleges, she introduces us to innovators who are remaking college for our own time by emphasizing student-centered learning that values creativity in the face of change above all. 

Thomas A. Kochan, is the George M. Bunker Professor of Work and Employment Relations at MIT's Sloan School of Management and Co-Director of the MIT Institute for Work and Employment Research.

"Shaping the Future of Work" lays out a comprehensive strategy for changing the course the American economy and employment system have been on for the past 30 years. The goal is to create more productive businesses that also provide good jobs and careers and by doing so build a more inclusive economy and broadly shared prosperity. This will require workers to acquire new sources of bargaining power and for business, labor, government, and educators to work together to meet the challenges and opportunities facing the next generation workforce.

70x2025VT logo
70x2025VT

Vermont Governor Phil Scott joined education and business leaders Tuesday at PC Construction in South Burlington to launch 70-by-2025-Vermont.  The goal of the initiative is to get 70 percent of Vermonters advanced training or education credentials by 2025.

The Vermont Board of Education has approved a school district's merger proposal under Act 46.

Burlington teachers on strike
Pat Bradley/WAMC

There will be no school in Burlington on Monday due to the teachers' strike, but the district is planning to make meals available to students at several locations.

Though politicians have allocated a tremendous amount of money to invest in pre-K education, parents of young children are strapped and stressed. Millions of mothers and fathers in all income brackets still can’t find spots for their children or have to send their kids to low quality programs.

Many don’t know what to look for even when they do have choices. By combining the stories of struggling parents, committed teachers, and groundbreaking administrators, author Suzanne Bouffard’s new book: The Most Important Year: Pre-Kindergarten and the Future of Our Children looks inside some of the country’s best pre-K programs to expose the surprising ingredients that make them work and give children the skills to improve the trajectory of their lives. 

Suzanne Bouffard is a writer with a background in child development and education.

  

Our Falling into Place series spotlights the important work of -and fosters collaboration between- not-for-profit organizations in our communities; allowing us all to fall into place.

Falling Into Place is supported by The Seymour Fox Memorial Foundation, Providing a helping hand to turn inspiration into accomplishment. See more possibilities … see more promise… see more progress.

Robin Christenson is executive director of Capital Region Sponsor-A-Scholar. Capital Region Sponsor-A-Scholar is the only college access and success program in the area. The program assists low-income, academically promising students to prepare for college success starting in the 10th grade. 

Crews have wrapped up work to upgrade residence halls on three New York state campuses just in time for the start of fall classes.

  Our Falling into Place series spotlights the important work of -and fosters collaboration between- not-for-profit organizations in our communities; allowing us all to fall into place.

Falling Into Place is supported by The Seymour Fox Memorial Foundation, Providing a helping hand to turn inspiration into accomplishment. See more possibilities … see more promise… see more progress.

Castle Island Bilingual Montessori provides an accessible world-class education, fully immersed in English and Spanish, in a fully implemented Montessori environment for families in the Capital Region of New York.

We are joined by Diane Nickerson, Founding School Director and John Riccardo, AmeriCorps VISTA (Volunteers In Service To America) assigned to Castle Island as Outreach Coordinator.

Jacques Berlinerblau is Professor and Director of the Center for Jewish Civilization at the Edmund A. Walsh School of Foreign Service at Georgetown University.

In his new book, Campus Confidential, he breaks ranks to reveal what's wrong with American higher education. Professors can be underpaid. Marginalized. Over-reviewed. But one fact remains: The success of education depends on them.

Seiji Ozawa Hall at Tanglewood
Sarah LaDuke

As you walk along Tanglewood’s meandering paths, it’s easy to miss a series of small wooden shacks nestled amongst the pine trees -- until you hear the sweet music emanating from within. It’s here that the Tanglewood Music Center Fellows hone their craft and learn from the masters.

For decades, talented young musicians from around the country and around the globe have been coming to the Berkshires to study with some of the best musicians in the world.  Today we’re joined by Ellen Highstein – the Director of the Tanglewood Music Center.

The last remaining farm within Saratoga Springs city limits is under new management by a team that will use the property as a center for agriculture and education. 

Pitney Meadows Community Farm is ready for summer with Community Gardens, and local farm and food training and education. They’ll be a year-round farm-hub that shares the bounty of upstate New York agriculture and community. The grounds will also provide nature trails and host community events.

Barbara Glaser and Natalie Walsh join us now to tell us more.

Barbara is a leader in open-space preservation in Saratoga Springs since the 1980s, Barbara Glaser has played a key role in the establishment of Pitney Meadows Community Farm. Natalie is the director of the new Pitney Meadows Community Gardens.

New York State Education Commissioner MaryEllen Elia
Pat Bradley/WAMC

New York State Education Commissioner MaryEllen Elia was in Plattsburgh Thursday to hold a public hearing on the state’s draft regulations to meet the federal Every Student Succeeds Act, which replaces No Child Left Behind.


  The new documentary STEP shares the story of three young women in the first graduating class at Baltimore Leadership School for Young Women and their experiences with school, their families, boyfriends, friends, and their Step team.

 

Pushed to succeed by devoted teachers, teammates, counselors, coaches and themselves, they chase their dreams: to win a step championship and to be accepted into college.

 

STEP which won the U.S. Documentary Special Jury Award for Inspirational Filmmaking at Sundance this year, will have its Massachusetts premiere as the opening night film at the Berkshire International Film Festival -- screening tonight at 6pm at The Mahaiwe in Great Barrington.

 

The film is directed by Amanda Lipitz who joins us.

Lucas Willard / WAMC

Note 5/4/2017: An earlier version of this story referred to the Pitney Meadows Community Farm as the Pitney Meadows Community Foundation. The original audio of this story remains posted.

The last remaining farm within Saratoga Springs city limits is under new management by a team that wants to use the property as a center for agriculture and education. As WAMC’s Southern Adirondack Bureau Chief Lucas Willard reports, a group of local students is making recommendations for how to move forward.

In How May I Help You?: An Immigrant's Journey from MBA to Minimum Wage, Deepak Singh chronicles his downward mobility as an immigrant to a small town in Virginia. Armed with an MBA from India, Singh can get only a minimum-wage job in an electronics store. Every day he confronts unfamiliar American mores, from strange idioms to deeply entrenched racism.

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