education

  Among the first generation of boys prescribed medication for hyperactivity in the 1980s, Timothy Denevi took Ritalin at the age of six, and during the first week, it triggered a psychotic reaction. Doctors recommended behavior therapy, then antidepressants.

Nothing worked. As Timothy’s parents and doctors sought to treat his behavior, he was subjected to a liquid diet, a sleep-deprived EEG, and bizarre behavioral assessments before finding help in therapy combined with medication. In Hyper, Timothy describes how he makes his way through school.

  Dan-el Padilla Peralta is one of millions of young undocumented men and women brought to the country as children. He is also a gifted scholar who made his way to some of the world’s most elite schools.

Peralta’s new book is: Undocumented: A Dominican Boy’s Odyssey From A Homeless Shelter To The Ivy League evocatively recounts Peralta’s journey from the New York City shelter system to the Ivy League.


 Jackie Mercurio lives with her husband, five children, and black Lab in New York. She was recently named Winner of the Good Housekeeping Memoir Contest (2014). Her website iswww.jackiemercurio.com

Challenges Await For New State Ed Commissioner

Jul 14, 2015
Karen DeWitt

New York's new education commissioner has been on the job just over a week, and she’s been traveling the state on a listening tour to reach out to teachers, school boards and others who’ve been buffeted by an intense political climate during the most recent legislative session.  Commissioner Mary Ellen Elia attended a meeting of the Rural Schools Association in Cooperstown Monday.

betterloanchoice.com

Some state colleges and universities are adding graduate programs and changing their names to attract more students — and precious out-of-state tuition dollars.

  Richard H. Thaler has spent his career studying the radical notion that the central agents in the economy are humans―predictable, error-prone individuals.

His new book, Misbehaving, accounts the struggle to bring an academic discipline back down to earth and change the way we think about economics, ourselves, and our world.

Richard H. Thaler is a professor of behavioral science and economics at the University of Chicago Booth School of Business and, in 2015, the president of the American Economic Association.

Two words — “sharp dissent” — are not normally used in the same sentence as “New York State Board of Regents.”

The schedule called for the New York State Legislature to be home for the summer by this week, but lawmakers are still in Albany as legislative leaders and Governor Andrew Cuomo try to reach agreement on a number of major issues, including making the 2 percent tax cap permanent, and changes to the charter school limit. While those are education issues, Tim Kremer, the Executive Director of the New York State School Boards Association, says everything has been tied to just one issue.

  A young lad who would rather draw than do math, spell, or gargle finds the perfect outlet for his always-on imagination in this manifesto to creative joie de vivre, featuring a book within a book, from the brilliant minds that brought you The Fantastic Flying Books of Mr. Morris Lessmore.

Full of nostalgic references to a time when TV was black-and-white and Sunday newspapers had things called the funnies, this wildly fun story-within-a-story is based loosely on children’s book legend William Joyce’s third grade year, and includes a sewn-in mini-book of that tale of the world’s smartest booger.

  Since 1996, Capital Region Sponsor-A-Scholar has been helping students from low-income families acquire the academic skills they need to earn high school diplomas and enter college.

The agency, founded by civic leaders and social entrepreneurs in 1996, currently serves over 400 aspiring scholars from Albany, Schenectady and Troy High Schools.

Support includes weekly homework sessions, paid tutors, graphing calculators, fees for advanced placement courses, SAT preparation and testing, and for college visits and applications.

Here to tell us more is Capital Region Sponsor-A-Scholar Executive Director, Bill Corbett.

Regents Tap New Education Commissioner For New York

May 26, 2015

A Florida school superintendent has been appointed New York education commissioner.

The Board of Regents voted unanimously Tuesday to hire MaryEllen Elia at a salary of $250,000 a year.

Elia most recently led the Hillsborough County school district, which includes Tampa, Florida. She succeeds John King Jr., who stepped down at the end of 2014 for a post in President Barack Obama's administration.

Karen Magee: Why Do The Rich Need More Tax Credits?

May 21, 2015

Two recent events — one political, one cultural — offer a glimpse into two worlds.

Albany Teacher Seeks Scholarship Program For Refugees

May 20, 2015

Brian Huskie has never flinched from a challenge. He served in the National Guard in Iraq and then came home to teach at an urban high school, Albany High, where he teaches English to students including refugees from Burma, Iraq, Nepal and Africa whose English skills in some cases don't exist. Huskie is now working to fund a scholarship for the refugee students through the State University of New York.

Vermont lawmakers looking to overhaul the state's school governance system are going to have to resolve significant differences between the House and Senate if they hope to pass a bill this year.

Lucas Willard / WAMC

From Common Core testing to teacher evaluations, education is one of the most contentious issues in New York right now. About two dozen teachers, administrators, and union officials participated in a roundtable discussion this morning to offer their own ideas on the state’s education policies with their local Assemblymember and Regent Board member.

  Sir Ken Robinson is one of the world’s most influential educators. Listed by Fast Company as “one of the world’s elite thinkers on creativity and innovation,” he advises governments, corporations, and leading cultural institutions.

In his new book, Creative Schools: The Grassroots Revolution That’s Transforming Education, he shows parents, educators and administrators how they can transform the way our schools work. He says - by focusing first on the students and teachers (not test scores), schools can evolve into the organic, personal learning environments they deserve to be.

http://www.foodislife.org/

This campus is swarming with diligent students – dead-set on becoming the best in their field. But how does a person decide that they want to make food and food service their career?

Darcy Sala is the chef-instructor for Dutchess County BOCES Career and Technical Institute in Poughkeepsie, NY. She graduated from The CIA in 2001 and she joins us now along with Kimberly Calle – an 11th grader at John Jay High School in Hopewell Junction who is part of the culinary program at Dutchess BOCES to talk about how people find their passion for food prep and turn it into a career.

4/15/15 Panel

Apr 15, 2015

  The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Today's panelists are WAMC's Alan Chartock, SUNY Albany Journalism Professor and Investigative Professor, Rosemary Armao, and political consultant, Libby Post.

Scheduled topics include Cuba off terrorism list; Congress allowed in on Iran; Atlanta educators sentenced; Retiree savings changes; EU Google anti-trust.

Roadtrip Nation helps young people take on the age-old question “What are you going to do with your life?” in a groundbreaking way. Nathan Geghard, from the interview based, inspirational TV series, has a new book which aims to help people think deeply about how they can thrive in the work place. Roadmap: The Get-It-Together Guide for Figuring Out What to Do with Your Life includes prompts for write-ins and engaging graphs which make the self-discovery process exciting, active, and personally impactful.

4/3/15 Panel

Apr 3, 2015

  The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Today's panelists are WAMC's Alan Chartock, SUNY Albany Journalism Professor and Investigative Professor, Rosemary Armao, and NYPIRG’s Blair Horner.

Scheduled topics include: Iran Deal, 70 killed in Kenya attack, Indiana and Arkansas Revise Religious Freedom Bills, Atlanta Educators Convicted in School Cheating Scandal.

  American higher education is at a crossroads. Cost-minded students and their families--and the public at large--are questioning the worth of a college education, even as study after study shows how important it is to economic and social mobility. And as elite institutions trim financial aid and change other business practices in search of more sustainable business models, racial and economic stratification in American higher education is only growing.

In American Higher Education in Crisis?: What Everyone Needs to Know, Goldie Blumenstyk, who has been reporting on higher education trends for 25 years, guides readers through the forces and trends that have brought the education system to this point, and highlights some of the ways they will reshape America's colleges in the years to come.

Geoffrey Canada has devoted his life to help change the quality of life of inner city children across the United States. From 1990 to 2014, he served as the President and Chief Executive Officer for the Harlem Children’s Zone, an organization which has guided more than 13,000 children and 14,000 adults through programs which focus on education, housing development, and community pride. In response to the program’s success, the Obama administration announced a replica program, Promise Neighborhoods, which in 2010 was awarded $10 million in federal grants in hopes of aiding 21 poverty-stricken communities in U.S. cities.

In 2011, Geoffrey Canada was named to the TIME 100 list of most influential people, and, in 2014, was named as one of Fortune’s 50 greatest leaders in the world. He will be speaking at Siena College’s Marcelle Athletic Complex on Thursday, March 26 at 7 p.m. as part of Siena’s Martin Luther King Jr. and Coretta Scott King Lecture Series on Race and Nonviolent Social Change. 

  It’s the American dream: get a good education, work hard, buy a house, and achieve prosperity and success. But, according to our next guest, during the last twenty-five years we have seen a disturbing “opportunity gap” emerge.

Harvard University Public Policy Professor, Robert Putnam, says Americans have believed in the idea that all kids, regardless of their family background, should have a decent chance to improve their lot in life. Putnam says this central tenet of the American dream seems no longer true or at the least, much less true than it was.

His new book is: Our Kids: The American Dream in Crisis. Robert Putnam is the Peter and Isabel Malkin Professor of Public Policy at Harvard University. Nationally honored as a leading humanist and a renowned scientist, he has written fourteen books and has consulted for the last four US Presidents.

  Who gets to go to college? Who can afford it and what are you getting for your money? Is it smart to go into massive debt to get a degree? What is the future of education in America and what does that future mean for the workplace, the government, our children and colleagues, and for ourselves?

These questions around education and access come as college prices have exploded and whole generations are sinking deeper into college debt. At the same time, tech entrepreneurs and professors from some of the world’s most elite universities have been racing to revolutionize higher education with massive college courses taught—for free—online.

In The End of College: Creating the Future of Learning and the University of Everywhere, education researcher and writer Kevin Carey shows how innovations in digital learning can help higher education.

Andrew Buck/Wikipedia

New Hampshire senators have passed a bill that would require public schools to continue teaching cursive and multiplication tables. The bill is aimed at making sure schools maintain those skills as schools adopt new standards and incorporate more technology in the classroom.

  Standing on the foundations of America’s promise of equal opportunity, our universities purport to serve as engines of social mobility and practitioners of democracy. But as acclaimed scholar and pioneering civil rights advocate Lani Guinier argues in her book, The Tyranny of the Meritocracy: Democratizing Higher Education in America, the merit systems that dictate the admissions practices of these institutions are functioning to select and privilege elite individuals rather than create learning communities geared to advance democratic societies.

Listener Essay - Embracing The Fear

Feb 20, 2015

  Casey Mulligan Walsh is a speech-language pathologist and writer who lives in West Sand Lake. Though she’s made peace with winter driving, it’s still not her strong suit.

Lucas Willard / WAMC

Congresswoman Elise Stefanik of Northern New York toured the region today to discuss education issues with students and faculty. WAMC’s Southern Adirondack Bureau Chief Lucas Willard caught up with the freshman lawmaker in Malta.

    Helping students develop their ability to deliberate political questions is an essential component of democratic education, but introducing political issues into the classroom is pedagogically challenging and raises ethical dilemmas for teachers.

In their book, The Political Classroom: Evidence and Ethics in Democratic Education, Diana E. Hess and Paula McAvoy argue that teachers will make better professional judgments about these issues if they aim toward creating "political classrooms," which engage students in deliberations about questions that ask, "How should we live together?"

http://www.fortticonderoga.org/learn/neh

  We are very happy to continue our regular feature – Ideas Matter: Checking in with the Public Humanities.

Today we learn about humanities in schools and teacher development resources in the humanities by talking about the National Endowment for the Humanities Summer Programs in the Humanities for School and College Educators – and more specifically about NEH’s program at Fort Ticonderoga. Fort Ticonderoga will be hosting NEH Landmarks of American History and Culture Workshops for School Teachers in July 2015.

We are joined by Pleun Bouricius, Director of Grants and Programs, MAss Humanities and Richard Strum, Fort Ticonderoga’s Director of Education.

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