education

Regents Tap New Education Commissioner For New York

May 26, 2015

A Florida school superintendent has been appointed New York education commissioner.

The Board of Regents voted unanimously Tuesday to hire MaryEllen Elia at a salary of $250,000 a year.

Elia most recently led the Hillsborough County school district, which includes Tampa, Florida. She succeeds John King Jr., who stepped down at the end of 2014 for a post in President Barack Obama's administration.

Karen Magee: Why Do The Rich Need More Tax Credits?

May 21, 2015

Two recent events — one political, one cultural — offer a glimpse into two worlds.

Albany Teacher Seeks Scholarship Program For Refugees

May 20, 2015

Brian Huskie has never flinched from a challenge. He served in the National Guard in Iraq and then came home to teach at an urban high school, Albany High, where he teaches English to students including refugees from Burma, Iraq, Nepal and Africa whose English skills in some cases don't exist. Huskie is now working to fund a scholarship for the refugee students through the State University of New York.

Vermont lawmakers looking to overhaul the state's school governance system are going to have to resolve significant differences between the House and Senate if they hope to pass a bill this year.

Lucas Willard / WAMC

From Common Core testing to teacher evaluations, education is one of the most contentious issues in New York right now. About two dozen teachers, administrators, and union officials participated in a roundtable discussion this morning to offer their own ideas on the state’s education policies with their local Assemblymember and Regent Board member.

  Sir Ken Robinson is one of the world’s most influential educators. Listed by Fast Company as “one of the world’s elite thinkers on creativity and innovation,” he advises governments, corporations, and leading cultural institutions.

In his new book, Creative Schools: The Grassroots Revolution That’s Transforming Education, he shows parents, educators and administrators how they can transform the way our schools work. He says - by focusing first on the students and teachers (not test scores), schools can evolve into the organic, personal learning environments they deserve to be.

http://www.foodislife.org/

This campus is swarming with diligent students – dead-set on becoming the best in their field. But how does a person decide that they want to make food and food service their career?

Darcy Sala is the chef-instructor for Dutchess County BOCES Career and Technical Institute in Poughkeepsie, NY. She graduated from The CIA in 2001 and she joins us now along with Kimberly Calle – an 11th grader at John Jay High School in Hopewell Junction who is part of the culinary program at Dutchess BOCES to talk about how people find their passion for food prep and turn it into a career.

4/15/15 Panel

Apr 15, 2015

  The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Today's panelists are WAMC's Alan Chartock, SUNY Albany Journalism Professor and Investigative Professor, Rosemary Armao, and political consultant, Libby Post.

Scheduled topics include Cuba off terrorism list; Congress allowed in on Iran; Atlanta educators sentenced; Retiree savings changes; EU Google anti-trust.

Roadtrip Nation helps young people take on the age-old question “What are you going to do with your life?” in a groundbreaking way. Nathan Geghard, from the interview based, inspirational TV series, has a new book which aims to help people think deeply about how they can thrive in the work place. Roadmap: The Get-It-Together Guide for Figuring Out What to Do with Your Life includes prompts for write-ins and engaging graphs which make the self-discovery process exciting, active, and personally impactful.

4/3/15 Panel

Apr 3, 2015

  The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Today's panelists are WAMC's Alan Chartock, SUNY Albany Journalism Professor and Investigative Professor, Rosemary Armao, and NYPIRG’s Blair Horner.

Scheduled topics include: Iran Deal, 70 killed in Kenya attack, Indiana and Arkansas Revise Religious Freedom Bills, Atlanta Educators Convicted in School Cheating Scandal.

  American higher education is at a crossroads. Cost-minded students and their families--and the public at large--are questioning the worth of a college education, even as study after study shows how important it is to economic and social mobility. And as elite institutions trim financial aid and change other business practices in search of more sustainable business models, racial and economic stratification in American higher education is only growing.

In American Higher Education in Crisis?: What Everyone Needs to Know, Goldie Blumenstyk, who has been reporting on higher education trends for 25 years, guides readers through the forces and trends that have brought the education system to this point, and highlights some of the ways they will reshape America's colleges in the years to come.

Geoffrey Canada has devoted his life to help change the quality of life of inner city children across the United States. From 1990 to 2014, he served as the President and Chief Executive Officer for the Harlem Children’s Zone, an organization which has guided more than 13,000 children and 14,000 adults through programs which focus on education, housing development, and community pride. In response to the program’s success, the Obama administration announced a replica program, Promise Neighborhoods, which in 2010 was awarded $10 million in federal grants in hopes of aiding 21 poverty-stricken communities in U.S. cities.

In 2011, Geoffrey Canada was named to the TIME 100 list of most influential people, and, in 2014, was named as one of Fortune’s 50 greatest leaders in the world. He will be speaking at Siena College’s Marcelle Athletic Complex on Thursday, March 26 at 7 p.m. as part of Siena’s Martin Luther King Jr. and Coretta Scott King Lecture Series on Race and Nonviolent Social Change. 

  It’s the American dream: get a good education, work hard, buy a house, and achieve prosperity and success. But, according to our next guest, during the last twenty-five years we have seen a disturbing “opportunity gap” emerge.

Harvard University Public Policy Professor, Robert Putnam, says Americans have believed in the idea that all kids, regardless of their family background, should have a decent chance to improve their lot in life. Putnam says this central tenet of the American dream seems no longer true or at the least, much less true than it was.

His new book is: Our Kids: The American Dream in Crisis. Robert Putnam is the Peter and Isabel Malkin Professor of Public Policy at Harvard University. Nationally honored as a leading humanist and a renowned scientist, he has written fourteen books and has consulted for the last four US Presidents.

  Who gets to go to college? Who can afford it and what are you getting for your money? Is it smart to go into massive debt to get a degree? What is the future of education in America and what does that future mean for the workplace, the government, our children and colleagues, and for ourselves?

These questions around education and access come as college prices have exploded and whole generations are sinking deeper into college debt. At the same time, tech entrepreneurs and professors from some of the world’s most elite universities have been racing to revolutionize higher education with massive college courses taught—for free—online.

In The End of College: Creating the Future of Learning and the University of Everywhere, education researcher and writer Kevin Carey shows how innovations in digital learning can help higher education.

Andrew Buck/Wikipedia

New Hampshire senators have passed a bill that would require public schools to continue teaching cursive and multiplication tables. The bill is aimed at making sure schools maintain those skills as schools adopt new standards and incorporate more technology in the classroom.

  Standing on the foundations of America’s promise of equal opportunity, our universities purport to serve as engines of social mobility and practitioners of democracy. But as acclaimed scholar and pioneering civil rights advocate Lani Guinier argues in her book, The Tyranny of the Meritocracy: Democratizing Higher Education in America, the merit systems that dictate the admissions practices of these institutions are functioning to select and privilege elite individuals rather than create learning communities geared to advance democratic societies.

Listener Essay - Embracing The Fear

Feb 20, 2015

  Casey Mulligan Walsh is a speech-language pathologist and writer who lives in West Sand Lake. Though she’s made peace with winter driving, it’s still not her strong suit.

Lucas Willard / WAMC

Congresswoman Elise Stefanik of Northern New York toured the region today to discuss education issues with students and faculty. WAMC’s Southern Adirondack Bureau Chief Lucas Willard caught up with the freshman lawmaker in Malta.

    Helping students develop their ability to deliberate political questions is an essential component of democratic education, but introducing political issues into the classroom is pedagogically challenging and raises ethical dilemmas for teachers.

In their book, The Political Classroom: Evidence and Ethics in Democratic Education, Diana E. Hess and Paula McAvoy argue that teachers will make better professional judgments about these issues if they aim toward creating "political classrooms," which engage students in deliberations about questions that ask, "How should we live together?"

http://www.fortticonderoga.org/learn/neh

  We are very happy to continue our regular feature – Ideas Matter: Checking in with the Public Humanities.

Today we learn about humanities in schools and teacher development resources in the humanities by talking about the National Endowment for the Humanities Summer Programs in the Humanities for School and College Educators – and more specifically about NEH’s program at Fort Ticonderoga. Fort Ticonderoga will be hosting NEH Landmarks of American History and Culture Workshops for School Teachers in July 2015.

We are joined by Pleun Bouricius, Director of Grants and Programs, MAss Humanities and Richard Strum, Fort Ticonderoga’s Director of Education.

Cuomo Demands Non-PC Answers From State Ed Officials

Dec 18, 2014

New York Governor Andrew Cuomo has written a letter to state education officials, saying he wants answers on why 99 percent of teachers scored highly on the most recent evaluations, while other data shows two-thirds of school children performing below acceptable levels in math and English.

The New York state Education Department acted irresponsibly last month when it took the unlikely step of publicly releasing college-specific data on the state’s new teacher certification exams.

Next week, an Assembly Committee will hold a hearing on improving access to financial aid for college students.  One of the issues will be better access for part time community college students, who are the fastest growing group of students.

empirecenter.org

On Election Day next week, New Yorkers will decide three ballot questions. No. 3 is called the Smart Schools Bond Act of 2014, a measure from Governor Andrew Cuomo that would allow the state to borrow $2 billion to equip schools with computers, tablets, wireless internet and other technology. But on group think it's a bad idea. EJ McMahon, president of the Empire Center for Public Policy in Albany, says borrowing isn't the main objection. He says there appears to be no demand from educators.

  The Windsor Mountain School in Lenox, Massachusetts was an ahead of its time boarding school that honored diversity and became the first co-ed integrated boarding school in the Berkshires.

After being a target of the Nazi regime, Max and Gertrud Bondy came to America and opened their school in Windsor, Vermont and later moved to Lenox in 1944.

Families like the Belafontes, Poitiers and Campanellas were attracted to the school for its multi-cultural and international curriculum. Then the school closed in 1975.

  Perhaps no profession is so constantly discussed, regulated, and maligned by non-practitioners as teaching. The voices of the teachers themselves are conspicuously missing.

Defying this trend, teacher and writer Garret Keizer takes us to school in his book, Getting Schooled: The Reeducation of an American Teacher, an arresting account of his return to the same rural Vermont high school where he taught fourteen years ago.

When author Jeff Hobbs arrived at Yale University, he became fast friends with the man who would be his college roommate for four years, Robert Peace. Robert’s life was rough from the beginning in the crime-ridden streets of Newark in the 1980s, with his father in jail and his mother earning less than $15,000 a year.

Karen Magee: Your Vote And Your Voice

Sep 23, 2014

Aretha Franklin’s 1967 hit song “Respect” is on my mind these days.

  As a professor at Yale, Bill Deresiewicz saw something that troubled him deeply. His students, some of the nation’s brightest minds, were adrift when it came to the big questions: how to think critically and creatively, and how to find a sense of purpose.

His new book, Excellent Sheep: The Miseducation Of The American Elite And The Way To A Meaningful Life, takes a sharp look at the high-pressure conveyor belt that begins with parents and counselors who demand perfect grades and culminates in the skewed applications Deresiewicz saw firsthand as a member of Yale’s admissions committee.

Karen Hitchcock: The Many Faces Of The Common Core Debate

Jul 24, 2014

Over the last several months, discussions of the Common Core State Standards have been eclipsed by the public’s reaction to major issues which have arisen in their implementation – issues such as declining student test scores, and the role of such test scores in teacher evaluations, evaluations mandated if a state was to receive its share of federal money from the “Race to the Top” funds. The Common Core, we remember, is a set of standards or goals which has been developed to describe what our students should achieve at various points in their education. Accepted by some 45 states and the District of Columbia, these standards are meant to ensure that our young people will be prepared for whatever futures our rapidly evolving society creates, that they will be college-ready and employment-ready, that they will be globally competitive.

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