education

Geoffrey Canada has devoted his life to help change the quality of life of inner city children across the United States. From 1990 to 2014, he served as the President and Chief Executive Officer for the Harlem Children’s Zone, an organization which has guided more than 13,000 children and 14,000 adults through programs which focus on education, housing development, and community pride. In response to the program’s success, the Obama administration announced a replica program, Promise Neighborhoods, which in 2010 was awarded $10 million in federal grants in hopes of aiding 21 poverty-stricken communities in U.S. cities.

In 2011, Geoffrey Canada was named to the TIME 100 list of most influential people, and, in 2014, was named as one of Fortune’s 50 greatest leaders in the world. He will be speaking at Siena College’s Marcelle Athletic Complex on Thursday, March 26 at 7 p.m. as part of Siena’s Martin Luther King Jr. and Coretta Scott King Lecture Series on Race and Nonviolent Social Change. 

  It’s the American dream: get a good education, work hard, buy a house, and achieve prosperity and success. But, according to our next guest, during the last twenty-five years we have seen a disturbing “opportunity gap” emerge.

Harvard University Public Policy Professor, Robert Putnam, says Americans have believed in the idea that all kids, regardless of their family background, should have a decent chance to improve their lot in life. Putnam says this central tenet of the American dream seems no longer true or at the least, much less true than it was.

His new book is: Our Kids: The American Dream in Crisis. Robert Putnam is the Peter and Isabel Malkin Professor of Public Policy at Harvard University. Nationally honored as a leading humanist and a renowned scientist, he has written fourteen books and has consulted for the last four US Presidents.

  Who gets to go to college? Who can afford it and what are you getting for your money? Is it smart to go into massive debt to get a degree? What is the future of education in America and what does that future mean for the workplace, the government, our children and colleagues, and for ourselves?

These questions around education and access come as college prices have exploded and whole generations are sinking deeper into college debt. At the same time, tech entrepreneurs and professors from some of the world’s most elite universities have been racing to revolutionize higher education with massive college courses taught—for free—online.

In The End of College: Creating the Future of Learning and the University of Everywhere, education researcher and writer Kevin Carey shows how innovations in digital learning can help higher education.

Andrew Buck/Wikipedia

New Hampshire senators have passed a bill that would require public schools to continue teaching cursive and multiplication tables. The bill is aimed at making sure schools maintain those skills as schools adopt new standards and incorporate more technology in the classroom.

  Standing on the foundations of America’s promise of equal opportunity, our universities purport to serve as engines of social mobility and practitioners of democracy. But as acclaimed scholar and pioneering civil rights advocate Lani Guinier argues in her book, The Tyranny of the Meritocracy: Democratizing Higher Education in America, the merit systems that dictate the admissions practices of these institutions are functioning to select and privilege elite individuals rather than create learning communities geared to advance democratic societies.

Listener Essay - Embracing The Fear

Feb 20, 2015

  Casey Mulligan Walsh is a speech-language pathologist and writer who lives in West Sand Lake. Though she’s made peace with winter driving, it’s still not her strong suit.

Lucas Willard / WAMC

Congresswoman Elise Stefanik of Northern New York toured the region today to discuss education issues with students and faculty. WAMC’s Southern Adirondack Bureau Chief Lucas Willard caught up with the freshman lawmaker in Malta.

    Helping students develop their ability to deliberate political questions is an essential component of democratic education, but introducing political issues into the classroom is pedagogically challenging and raises ethical dilemmas for teachers.

In their book, The Political Classroom: Evidence and Ethics in Democratic Education, Diana E. Hess and Paula McAvoy argue that teachers will make better professional judgments about these issues if they aim toward creating "political classrooms," which engage students in deliberations about questions that ask, "How should we live together?"

http://www.fortticonderoga.org/learn/neh

  We are very happy to continue our regular feature – Ideas Matter: Checking in with the Public Humanities.

Today we learn about humanities in schools and teacher development resources in the humanities by talking about the National Endowment for the Humanities Summer Programs in the Humanities for School and College Educators – and more specifically about NEH’s program at Fort Ticonderoga. Fort Ticonderoga will be hosting NEH Landmarks of American History and Culture Workshops for School Teachers in July 2015.

We are joined by Pleun Bouricius, Director of Grants and Programs, MAss Humanities and Richard Strum, Fort Ticonderoga’s Director of Education.

Cuomo Demands Non-PC Answers From State Ed Officials

Dec 18, 2014

New York Governor Andrew Cuomo has written a letter to state education officials, saying he wants answers on why 99 percent of teachers scored highly on the most recent evaluations, while other data shows two-thirds of school children performing below acceptable levels in math and English.

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