egypt

If ever there was a need for U.S. diplomatic intervention in Middle East, this is the moment. Instead of sitting on the sidelines as a disinterested observer, Kerry and Company should be on a plane to Cairo to discuss an emerging schism in Saudi – Egyptian relations. In February, the Saudi kingdom announced that it was prepared to send ground troops to Syria to fight alongside the international coalition. Cairo objected.

  The new play Veils opens on Thursday at the Barrington Stage Company on the Boyd-Quinson Mainstage. This morning we meet the playwright, Tom Coash.

When Intisar, an African American Muslim student, arrives in Cairo for a year abroad, she hopes finally to be understood. She’s quickly enlisted by her liberal Egyptian roommate to help create a controversial blog debating the practice of wearing veils. Soon mounting political unrest threatens their new-found friendship.

Playwright, director, and dramaturg Tom Coash spent four years teaching playwriting at The American University in Cairo, Egypt. He was a Co-founder of the Offstage Theatre in Charlottesville, VA and has worked for such theaters as the Manhattan Theatre Club, Stageworks/Hudson, and Actors Theatre of Louisville.

   President Barack Obama gave an address this morning about the drone strike in Pakistan that killed hostages from U.S. and Italy.

To discuss that and other topics we welcome James Ketterer – the director of international academic initiatives at Bard College. He previously served as AMIDEAST country director in Egypt and has worked in government, academia and international development.

3/27/15 Panel

Mar 27, 2015

  The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Today's panelists are WAMC's Alan Chartock, Kingston Freeman Publisher Emeritus and SUNY Albany Journalism Professor and Investigative Reporter, Rosemary Armao.

Scheduled topics include: Harry Reid won't seek re-election; Germanwings co-pilot update; police brutality in Detroit; Egypt to Yemen; NYC Building Collapse; Downton Abbey to end.

2/17/15 Panel

Feb 17, 2015

  The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Today's panelists are WAMC’s Alan Chartock, SUNY at Albany journalism professor and investigative journalist, Rosemary Armao, and Associate Editor of The Times Union, Mike Spain.

Topics include: Egypt and ISIS, Obama ISIS Poll, Danish Attacks, Ukrainian Ceasefire?, Lesley Gore Dies, SNL 40, and TU Headlines.

  In January 2011, in Cairo’s Tahrir Square, a group of strangers sparked a revolution. Basem, an apolitical middle-class architect, jeopardized the lives of his family when he seized the chance to improve his country. Moaz, a contrarian Muslim Brother, defied his own organization to join the opposition.

These revolutionaries had little more than their idealism with which to battle the secret police, the old oligarchs, and a power-hungry military determined to keep control.

In Once Upon A Revolution: An Egyptian Story, Thanassis Cambanis tells the story of the dreamers who brought Egypt to the brink of freedom, and the dark powerful forces that—for the time being—stopped them short.

  Thirteen Days in September: Carter, Begin, and Sadat at Camp David is a day-by-day account of the 1978 Camp David conference, when President Jimmy Carter persuaded Israeli prime minister Menachem Begin and Egyptian president Anwar Sadat to sign the first peace treaty in the modern Middle East, one which endures to this day.

6/23/14 Panel

Jun 23, 2014

    

  Today's panelists are WAMC’s Alan Chartock, Newsman Ray Graf and Times Union Associate Editor, Mike Spain.

Topics include:
Iraq Update
Kerry on Ties to Egypt
Clinton - Imperial Image?
Honey Bee Initiative
US World Cup Draw

Herbert London: Understanding The Egyptian Military

May 28, 2014

For Americans, military matters are rarely considered. After all, without a draft, less than one-half of one percent of the nation has any direct involvement with military issues. The Congress is in a similar state largely unaware of military concerns as a Chinese wall has been erected between the military brass and the civilian leadership that makes decisions about its future.

Congressman Peter Welch returned this week from a Congressional oversight trip to Libya and Egypt. North Country Bureau Chief Pat Bradley spoke with Vermont’s at-large Democratic representative about the reason for, and his assessment of, the trip.

  Egypt is in turmoil.

In today’s Congressional Corner, New York Representative Bill Owens discusses the situation with WAMC’s Alan Chartock.

The turmoil in Egypt has brought horrific violence and few good options for the U.S. WAMC’s Alan Chartock spoke with Seyla Benhabib, Eugene Meyer Professor of Political Science and Philosophy at Yale University, about where the Arab Spring protests have led.

Stephen Gottlieb: Dealing With The Egyptian Miliary

Aug 20, 2013

If we can believe the observations of commentators over more than two centuries, Americans have always wanted to be liked. We want people to like us, not to fear or feel coerced by us. That works well for a democracy where politicians want people to vote for them.

8/1/13 - Panel

Aug 1, 2013

  For the first half of today's panel, Alan Chartock, Ray Graf, and Joe Donahue are joined by James Ketterer - Director of International Academic Initiatives & Senior Fellow at Bard College and just returned from 2-years in Egypt to discuss Egypt.

For the second half of the show, Fay Vincent, former Commissioner of Commissioner of Major League Baseball talks about the current and on-going steroid scandals in the sport.

Obviously I’ve been following the news from Egypt like everyone else. You don’t need commentators to tell you that ousting a democratically elected government is undemocratic and unacceptable. But I want to talk about Morsi’s mistakes because they illustrate a major misunderstanding of democracy.

7/2/13 - Panel

Jul 2, 2013

Today's panelists are WAMC's Alan Chartock and newsman, Ray Graf. Joe Donahue moderates.

Topics include:
Egypt
Rain Rain Go Away
Forest/Wild Fires
Obama’s Climate Change Speech

4/4/13 - Panel

Apr 4, 2013

  Today's panelists are WAMC’s Alan Chartock, WAMC’s Morning Edition Host, David Guistina, and University at Albany Journalism Professor and Investigative Reporter, Rosemary Armao. Ray Graf moderates.

This morning our discussion topics include:
• In a Budget Gesture, Obama Will Return 5% of His Salary
• Obama administration pushes banks to make home loans to people with weaker credit
• U.S. Embassy Tweets Jon Stewart's Egypt Monologue; Diplomatic Incident Ensues
• Latest Updates on the Gun Violence Debate
• Leno Blesses ‘Tonight Show’ Succession Plan

Egyptian protesters remain in the streets of Port Said and Suez, defying President Mohammed Morsi's declaration Sunday night of states of emergency and night-time curfews. Egyptian army troops are out on the streets but they did not interfere as thousands of people jeered Morsi's call.

A fifth day of "widening unrest," as The New York Times puts it, is underway in Egypt.

Clashes continue, Merrit Kennedy reports from Cairo for the NPR Newscast, even though President Mohammed Morsi has declared a 30-day state of emergency and night curfews in three provinces.

Yesterday’s violent protests in Egypt and Libya that led to the deaths of four U.S. State Department diplomats, including U-S Ambassador Chris Stevens, in the Libyan city of Benghazi were spurred in-part by a film that portrayed the Islamic Prophet Muhammad as a fraud and a womanizer.

This isn’t the first time those in Middle East have taken up arms against those who ridicule their pre-dominant religion, but it is one of only a few times in modern history that American diplomats have been killed as a result of protests.

Richard Walker

Anna D'Ambrosio, Director and Chief Curator of the Munson-Williams-Proctor Arts Institute Museum of Art joins us to tell us about their Shadow of the Sphinx exhibition which is on display through November 25th at the Munson-Williams-Proctor Arts Institute in Utica.