election

Ralph Nader knows a thing or two about running for President of the United States.

Named by The Atlantic as one of the hundred most influential figures in American history, and by Time and Life magazines as one of the most influential Americans of the twentieth century, Ralph Nader has helped us drive safer cars, eat healthier food, breathe better air, drink cleaner water, and work in safer environments for more than four decades.

In his new book, Breaking Through Power, Ralph Nader draws from a lifetime waging--and often winning--David vs. Goliath battles against big corporations and the United States government. He highlights the success stories of fellow Americans who organize change and work together to derail the many ways in which wealth manipulates politics, labor, media, the environment, and the quality of national life today.

Another national election, another case of bad polling.

In today’s Congressional Corner, Tim Vercellotti of the Western New England University poll and professor of political science, tells WAMC’s Alan Chartock what happened.

WAMC

It all comes down to today for Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton. It’s been one heck of a campaign season unlike any other. The candidates have the lowest favorability ratings of any in history. That’s just one of the reasons people are expressing anxiety, worry and uncertainty over the outcome. So how are you feeling on this Election Day? Are you nervous? Excited? Tell Dr. Alan (not a medical doctor) Chartock all about it! 

New York is poised to elect Hillary Clinton for president and give Chuck Schumer a fourth term as U.S. Senator, but down ballot races for Congress and state Senate are less certain.

Is this a post-truth election?

In today’s Congressional Corner, Tim Vercellotti of the Western New England University poll and professor of political science, concludes his conversation with WAMC’s Alan Chartock.

  Many Muslims have settled in Utica.

In today’s Congressional Corner, Republican New York state Assemblywoman Claudia Tenney, a candidate for the 22nd House district seat, tells WAMC’s Alan Chartock that she doesn’t appreciate Donald Trump’s recent comments even though she supports him.

  Upstate New York’s 22nd House district is getting a new representative.

In today’s Congressional Corner, Republican New York state Assemblywoman Claudia Tenney tells WAMC’s Alan Chartock why she’s running.

  John Dickerson is Moderator of Face the Nation and Political Director of CBS News and a columnist for Slate magazine. In the 2016 Election cycle he has interviewed every major candidate multiple times and was the chief moderator of CBS News' Democratic Debate.

The stakes are high. The characters full of striving and ego. Presidential campaigns are a contest for control of power in the most powerful country on earth. The battle of ideas has a clear end, with winners and losers, and along the way there are sharp turning points-primaries, debates, conventions, and scandals that squeeze candidates into emergency action, frantic grasping, and heroic gambles.

Whistlestop tells the human story of nervous gambits hatched in first-floor hotel rooms, failures of will before the microphone, and the cross-country crack-ups of long-planned stratagems.

  To outsiders, Florida seems baffling. It's a state where the voters went for Barack Obama twice, yet elected a Tea Party candidate as governor. Florida is touted as a care-free paradise, yet it's also known for its perils - alligators, sinkholes, pythons, hurricanes, and sharks, to name a few. It attracts 90 million visitors a year, some drawn by its impressive natural beauty, others bewitched by its man-made fantasies.

Craig Pittman's Oh, Florida! explores those contradictions and shows how they fit together to make this the most interesting state. It is the first book to explore the reasons why Florida is so wild and weird - and why that's okay. Florida couldn't be Florida without that sense of the unpredictable, unexpected, and unusual lurking behind every palm tree.

  Ever since Donald Trump entered the presidential race—in a press conference attended by paid actors, in which he slandered Mexican immigrants—he has dominated headlines, becoming the unrestrained id at the center of one of the most bizarre and alarming elections in American history.

It was not always so. In 1996, longtime New Yorker writer Mark Singer was conscripted by his editor to profile Donald Trump. At that time Trump was a mere Manhattan-centric megalomaniac, a failing casino operator mired in his second divorce and (he claimed) recovering from the bankruptcy proceedings that prompted him to inventory the contents of his Trump Tower home. 

In Trump and Me, Singer revisits the profile and recounts how its publication lodged inside its subject’s head as an enduring irritant—and how Singer (“A TOTAL LOSER!” according to Trump) cheerfully continued to bait him.

  In our Ideas Matter segment we take time just about every week to check in with the state humanities councils in our 7-state region.

Today, we will learn about the political impact of millennials and about a public lecture happening in August in Charlemont, MA, on the profound demographic transformation happening today, as characterized by the Millennial and Boomer generations.

We are joined today by Pam Porter, of The Charlemont Forum, and by Paul Taylor, who is the former Executive Vice President of the Pew Research Institute and the author of The Next America: Boomers, Millennials and the Looming Generational Showdown Paul will be speaking at the Charlemont Forum in Charlemont, MA, on Wednesday, August 10th. 

  In this most unusual election year, some voters say they have no one to back.

In today’s Congressional Corner, New York Representative Chris Gibson — a Republican from the 19th district — tells WAMC’s Alan Chartock why he’s still looking for a candidate. 

  Why is America living in an age of profound economic inequality? Why, despite the desperate need to address climate change, have even modest environmental efforts been defeated again and again? Why have protections for employees been decimated? Why do hedge-fund billionaires pay a far lower tax rate than middle-class workers?

The conventional answer is that a popular uprising against “big government” led to the ascendancy of a broad-based conservative movement. But Jane Mayer shows in her book, Dark Money: The Hidden History of the Billionaires Behind the Rise of the Radical Right, a network of exceedingly wealthy people with extreme libertarian views bankrolled a systematic, step-by-step plan to fundamentally alter the American political system.

  Reeling from the Great Depression, the United States and Germany elected two new leaders of diametrically opposing ideologies. In 1932, Franklin Roosevelt won the presidency and Adolf Hitler became chancellor.

Author and historian David Pietrusza will discuss his new book - 1932: The Rise of Hitler and FDR–Two Tales of Politics, Betrayal, and Unlikely Destiny.

  Countless books have been written about the civil rights movement, but far less attention has been paid to what happened after the dramatic passage of the Voting Rights Act in 1965 and the turbulent forces it unleashed.

Ari Berman is a political correspondent for The Nation and an investigative journalism Fellow at the Nation Institute. His writing has also appeared in The New York Times and Rolling Stone, and he is a frequent commentator on MSNBC and NPR.

In his book, Give Us the Ballot: The Modern Struggle for Voting Rights in America, he charts both the transformation of American democracy under the VRA and the counterrevolution that has sought to limit voting rights, from 1965 to the present day.

  Gary Hart is an American politician and a former Colorado senator, serving in Congress from 1975 to 1987.

His new book, The Republic of Conscience, is a meditation on the growing gap between the founding principles of the United States Constitution and our current political landscape.

Most of the pre-campaign talk has surrounded old names in politics: Bush and Clinton.

In today’s Congressional Corner, Tim Vercellotti, director of the Western New England University poll and professor of political science, tells WAMC’s Alan Chartock that some other candidates still have a shot.

She’s not even an official candidate yet, but Hillary Clinton is facing her first major campaign crisis.

In today’s Congressional Corner, Tim Vercellotti, director of the Western New England University poll and professor of political science, tells WAMC’s Alan Chartock that the former Secretary of State has been behind the curve. The two spoke before Clinton's Tuesday afternoon press conference.

  With the election in the rearview mirror, it’s time to look ahead to the incoming class.

In today’s Congressional Corner, Rutgers University political science professor Ross Baker tells WAMC’s Alan Chartock the electorate appears to be conflicted.

This past Election Day, all three statewide incumbents were easily re-elected, the Assembly’s Democratic majority got bigger, but consistent with the overall Republican political tsunami seen across the nation, the Republicans took back control of the state Senate and picked up some New York Congressional seats.

MONTPELIER, Vt. (AP) — Polls have closed around Vermont in a mid-term election that appears to have drawn light turnout in many parts of the state.

    Barack Obama has been a dirty word for many Democrats this election season.

In today’s Congressional Corner, New York representative Paul Tonko tells WAMC’s Alan Chartock that his party should embrace the president.

    Election Day is just two months away.

In today’s Congressional Corner, New York representative Nita Lowey tells WAMC’s Alan Chartock she’s hopeful Democrats will perform well this fall.

  Election Day is three months away. 

In today’s Congressional Corner, Connecticut representative Joe Courtney tells WAMC’s Alan Chartock that a Republican takeover of the Senate would be bad news.

Courtesy of Sean Eldridge for Congress

    In today’s Congressional Corner, Sean Eldridge — a Democratic candidate for New York’s 19th district seat — discusses foreign policy with WAMC’s Alan Chartock.

Courtesy of Sean Eldridge for Congress

    Election Day is nearing.

In today’s Congressional Corner, Sean Eldridge — a Democratic candidate for New York’s 19th district seat — tells WAMC’s Alan Chartock that he is optimistic about the race.

    Many Congresspeople say ousted Majority Leader Eric Cantor didn’t spend enough time back home.

In today’s Congressional Corner, Connecticut Representative Elizabeth Esty tells WAMC’s Alan Chartock that time in the district is vital.

7/8/14 Panel

Jul 8, 2014

  Today's panelists are WAMC’s Alan Chartock, Times Union Associate Editor Mike Spain and Political Consultant Libby Post.

Topics include:
Pope meets with Abused
Afghan Vote Fraud
Pot Legalization
Abortion Buffer Zones
Chicago Killings
TU Stories

    Immigration reform is still stalled in the House, and now it’s almost election season.

In today’s Congressional Corner, New York representative Paul Tonko tells WAMC’s Alan Chartock that major reforms are needed.

    Immigration reform may be a victim of election year politics.

In today’s Congressional Corner, Vermont representative Peter Welch tells WAMC’s Alan Chartock that Speaker Boehner should let the House vote yay or nay.

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