elections

Listener Essay - I Liked Ike

Jun 23, 2016

  This listener essay is by Steve Lewis. 

I Liked Ike

I liked Ike. He looked like a nice man on the red, white and blue button I saw on someone’s lapel at the Bohack’s. Somebody’s grandpa. He also looked kind of snappy saluting the troops in that tan Army uniform on the newsreels at the Roslyn Movie Theater.

My parents, Jewish immigrants from the boroughs, liked Stevenson, the tall bald guy famous for having a hole in the sole of his shoe. They said, with that adult shake of the head, that he was “very smart, very smart,” which I figured meant that Ike was probably not so sharp. So when my first grade teacher asked who we were voting for I made the brainy choice and raised my right hand for Adlai, my left hand pushing my right elbow up above Joan Nordlinger’s hand waving furiously next to mine. But I privately hoped the nice man with a kindly smile on the button would win.

Donald Trump at the Flynn Theatre
Pat Bradley/WAMC

Republican Presidential Candidate Donald Trump will make a campaign appearance in Plattsburgh ahead of the state's April 19 primary.

  Special interest groups increasingly control every level of government. The necessity of raising huge sums of campaign cash has completely changed the character of politics and policy making, determining what elected representatives stand for and how they spend their time. The marriage of great wealth and intense political influence has rendered our country unable to address our most pressing problems, from runaway government spending to climate change to the wealth gap. 

In Nation on the Take: How Big Money Corrupts Our Democracy and What We Can Do About It , Wendell Potter and Nick Penniman, two vigilant watchdogs, expose legalized corruption and link it to the kitchen-table issues citizens face every day.

Lucas Willard / WAMC

Recently re-elected Democratic Saratoga Springs Mayor Joanne Yepsen, joined by Democratic Party officials from the surrounding region, introduced the latest candidate to enter the race for New York’s 43rd Senate District.

“And I now proudly introduce Shaun Francis!” said Yepsen.

Francis, a native of the Capital Region, is making his run for the state senate his first foray into politics. The 36-year-old addressed his crowd of supporters at the Saratoga Hilton saying he is seeking to bring a change to the state legislature.

Senator Jeanne Shaheen
U.S. Senate

It’s less than a month until the first votes will be cast in the presidential primary campaign, with the early contests in Iowa and New Hampshire. New Hampshire U.S. Senator Jeanne Shaheen is a staunch supporter of Hilary Clinton’s bid.  In September, she endorsed the former Senator and Secretary of State. Clinton won in New Hampshire in 2008, but Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders is right next door and popular in the state.  Shaheen is one of the Clinton campaign’s most stalwart spokespeople. With the polls tightening in Iowa and New Hampshire, Senator Shaheen discussed the race with WAMC’s North Country Bureau Chief Pat Bradley.

Dave Lucas

It will be a busy election night in Saratoga Springs. With four contested races for City Hall and the introduction of the city's first Political Action Committee, WAMC's Southern Adirondack Bureau Chief Lucas Willard takes a look at what's at stake.

 One way or another, one Congressional district in our region is getting a new representative.

In today’s Congressional Corner, New York representative Sean Patrick Maloney tells WAMC’s Alan Chartock that he has worked well with retiring Republican Chris Gibson. 

WAMC/Pat Bradley

Village elections were held across New York Wednesday. Two challengers in some of the only contested mayoral races in the region claimed victory over their incumbent opponents.

1/26/15 Panel

Jan 26, 2015

  The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Today's panelists are WAMC’s Alan Chartock, WAMC Newsman Ray Graf and University at Albany Journalism Professor and Investigative Reporter, Rosemary Armao.

Topics include: President Obama in India, Elections in Greece, Blizzard, Reactions to American Sniper, and Medical Treatments Tailored to Patient's DNA.

  November’s elections cost Democrats control of the Senate.

In today’s Congressional Corner, Massachusetts Representative Jim McGovern tells WAMC’s Alan Chartock that Democrats need to inspire voters to turn out in midterm elections.

Wikimedia/Public Domain

The results of Tuesday’s national elections mean both the U.S. House and Senate will be controlled by Republicans when the new Congress is seated in January.  What does that mean for many of the Democratically-leaning districts in the Northeast? WAMC’s North Country Bureau Chief Pat Bradley gathered some thoughts from some of the region’s representatives.

Phil Roeder/Flickr

Voters who have taken part in today's midterms are expressing dissatisfaction and even anger with the Obama administration. But exit polling doesn't let Republican leaders off the hook either.The surveys of people leaving polling places showed the biggest concern is still the economy. Despite the drop in jobless rates and soaring stock prices, most voters say the economy is stagnating or getting worse.

Wikimedia Commons/Public Domain

Vermonters are going to the polls to choose their statewide elected officials. As WAMC’s North Country Bureau Chief Pat Bradley reports, time is running short before polls close in Vermont.

WAMC/Pat Bradley

The gubernatorial and Congressional races may be getting more attention, but many important down-ballot races will be decided November 4th as well. The Champlain Valley Business and Professional Women’s Club held a Meet the Candidates event Thursday night in Plattsburgh.  Candidates for the Assembly and Town Council discussed their platforms and answered questions.

9/17/14 Panel

Sep 17, 2014

  Today's panelists are WAMC’s Alan Chartock, Political Consultant Libby Post & Albany Journalism Professor and Investigative Reporter, Rosemary Armao.

Topics include:
Ground Troops?
GM Recall Outcry
Gov. Calls for Peterson Suspension
NFL Troubles - Redskins
Iowa Senate Race Importance

Congressman Sean Patrick Maloney
Courtesy of the Office of Congressman Sean Patrick Maloney

    Voters in the Hudson Valley are liable to throw incumbents out.

In today’s Congressional Corner, New York representative Sean Patrick Maloney tells WAMC’s Alan Chartock that he’s confident he has a better record than his November opponent.

6/30/14 Panel

Jun 30, 2014

  Today's panelists are WAMC’s Alan Chartock, Newsman Ray Graf and Times Union Associate Editor, Mike Spain.

Topics include:
New Vet Head Announced
Afghan Elections
Border Control
Alaska Postal Costs
ISIS name change

Thursday was the deadline for candidates desiring to be on Vermont’s August primary ballot to file their nominating petitions. The deadline is particularly important because a candidate must be on the primary ballot in order to appear on the general election ballot in November.

Blair Horner
C.W. McKeen / The Post - Standard, 2006

The New York State legislature now has 11 unfilled seats, after one Assemblyman resigned over a sexual harassment scandal, and another was expelled after being convicted of a felony.  But it could be another year before those seats are filled.

Warren County Election Results

Nov 6, 2013

Warren County:

Glens Falls Mayor:

John A Diamond [D]

Councilman at Large:

Dan Hall [D]
 

Warren County Supervisor Ward 1:

Daniel J. Girard [D]

Warren County Supervisor Ward 2:

Peter V. McDevitt [D]

Warren County Supervisor Ward 3:

Martha M. Noordsy [R]

Warren County Supervisor Ward 4:

James Brock [R]

Hudson Valley Election Results

Nov 6, 2013
Wikimedia Commons/Public Domain

Justice of the Supreme Court-9th Judicial District:

John P. Colangelo [D]

Victor G. Grossman [D]

Mark C. Dillion [R

John W. Sweeney, Jr. [R]

Daniel D. Angiolillo [R]

 

Dutchess County:

Dutchess County Comptroller:

James L. Coughlan [R]

Dutchess County Family Judge:

Joseph A. Egitto [R]

                                                Putnam County:

BOSTON (AP) — State officials say it is expected to cost Massachusetts at least $13.5 million to hold the special election to fill the U.S. Senate formerly held by Secretary of State John Kerry.

State Auditor Suzanne Bump has estimated that it will cost cities and towns nearly $8.3 million to run the April 30 primary election and the June 25 final. The special election has been classified by the auditor's office as an "unfunded local mandate," meaning the state must reimburse local communities for the costs they incur.

US State Dept.

JERUSALEM (AP) -- Israelis voted Tuesday in an election likely to keep hard-line Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu at the helm of government for a third term despite a turbulent record: no peace process with Palestinians, growing diplomatic isolation and signs of economic trouble ahead.

The balloting capped a lackluster three-month campaign that was expected to leave Netanyahu at the helm of a coalition dominated by hard-liners opposed to concessions that could bring Palestinians back to the negotiating table.

Lucas Willard / WAMC

Secretary of State William Galvin says a record number of Massachusetts voters cast ballots on Election Day.

Galvin says 3,184,196 people voted on Nov. 6, or 73.3 percent of the state's 4.3 million voters. That was about 81,000 more than participated in the elections of November 2008.

The final vote tallies are scheduled to be submitted to the Governor's Council on Wednesday for certification.

Vote certification means that the right to repair and medical marijuana ballot questions approved take effect Jan. 1.

Slow Democracy: Rediscovering Community, Bringing Decision Making Back Home is a new book that chronicles the ways in which ordinary people have mobilized to find local solutions to local problems. It invites us to bring the advantages of "slow" to our community decision-making.

The release of the documentary, SPLIT: A Deeper Divide couldn't be more timely. The film is a thorough investigation into the partisanship that is paralyzing American politics. Writer, director and producer Kelly Nyks has spent eight years traveling the country to ask questions that go to the heart of why our democracy has become so passionately divided. The U.S. State Department used the film to launch an Election 2012 program that introduces high school students abroad to American democracy and our political process.

Andre Pilarczyk

WAMC’s Alan Chartock is joined by former New York Governor Eliot Spitzer. This interview was taped October 21, 2012 in front of a live audience at The Linda in Albany.

New York state Senator Stephen Saland, a Republican running for reelection to the Poughkeepsie-area seat he has held since 1990, received a cross-party endorsement from Democratic Governor Andrew Cuomo last week. One of four Republicans who broke ranks to vote for same-sex marriage last year, Saland faces Democrat Terry Gipson and conservative Neil Di Carlo – his primary opponent – in the general election. Saland spoke today with WAMC’s Alan Chartock.

Host Alan Chartock is joined by Wendy Long, the Republican candidate for U.S. Senate running against incumbent Democrat Kirsten Gillibrand. They discuss abortion, tax reform, hydrofracking, and jobs.

U.S. Senate candidate Wendy Long, the Republican challenging incumbent New York Democrat Kirsten Gillibrand, says the controversial gas drilling process called hydrofracking — currently being studied by the state — is safe. Long told WAMC’s Alan Chartock on the Capitol Connection program this week that the economic benefits of fracking are too great not to go forward with drilling.

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