england

The Roundtable
11:35 am
Tue December 2, 2014

'When Lions Roar: The Churchills And The Kennedys' By Thomas Maier

    When Lions Roar begins in the mid-1930s at Chartwell, Winston Churchill's country estate, with new revelations surrounding a secret business deal orchestrated by Joseph P. Kennedy, the soon-to-be American ambassador to Great Britain and the father of future American president John F. Kennedy. From London to America, these two powerful families shared an ever-widening circle of friends, lovers, and political associates – soon shattered by World War II, spying, sexual infidelity, and the tragic deaths of JFK's sister Kathleen and his older brother Joe Jr. By the 1960s and JFK's presidency, the Churchills and the Kennedys had overcome their bitter differences and helped to define the “greatness” in each other.

Acclaimed biographer Thomas Maier tells this dynastic saga through fathers and their sons – and the remarkable women in their lives – providing keen insight into the Churchill and Kennedy families and the profound forces of duty, loyalty, courage and ambition that shaped them.

The Roundtable
11:12 am
Tue December 2, 2014

'The Churchill Factor: How One Man Made History' By Boris Johnson

    

  Fearless on the battlefield, Churchill had to be ordered by the king to stay out of action on D-Day; he pioneered aerial bombing and few could match his experience in organizing violence on a colossal scale, yet he hated war and scorned politicians who had not experienced its horrors. He was the most famous journalist of his time and perhaps the greatest orator of all time, despite a lisp and chronic depression he kept at bay by painting.

On the fiftieth anniversary of Churchill’s death, Boris Johnson celebrates the brilliance of one of the most important leaders of the twentieth century in the book, The Churchill Factor: How One Man Made History.

The Roundtable
11:35 am
Wed November 5, 2014

'No Land's Man' By Aasif Mandvi

  If you're an Indo-Muslim-British-American actor who has spent more time in bars than mosques over the past few decades, turns out it's a little tough to explain who you are or where you are from.

In No Land's Man, Aasif Mandvi explores this and other conundrums through stories about his family, ambition, desire, and culture that range from dealing with his brunch-obsessed father, to being a high-school-age Michael Jackson impersonator, to joining a Bible study group in order to seduce a nice Christian girl, to improbably becoming America's favorite Muslim/Indian/Arab/Brown/Doctor correspondent on The Daily Show with Jon Stewart.

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The Roundtable
10:35 am
Mon July 7, 2014

"One Plus One" by Jojo Moyes

  American audiences have fallen in love with Jojo Moyes. Ever since she debuted stateside, she has captivated readers and reviewers alike, and hit the New York Times bestseller list with the word-of-mouth sensation, Me Before You.

Now, with One Plus One, she’s written another contemporary opposites-attract love story. One Plus One tells the tale of Jess Thomas, a single mother and housecleaner in a southern England seaside town, and the thrown-together relationship she develops with one of her clients, the wealthy, hopelessly geeky Ed Nicholls.

The Roundtable
10:10 am
Wed May 14, 2014

Michael Dobbs' House Of Cards

    A dark tale of greed, corruption, and unquenchable ambition, House of Cards reveals that no matter the country, politics, intrigue and passion reign in the corridors of power. More than twenty years since its first publication it is still considered to be the definitive political thriller.

Michael Dobbs' novel - both its 1989 and 2014 incarnations - is a delicious wallow in British bad behavior, both public and private.

Michael Dobbs is also Lord Dobbs of Wylye, a member of the British House of Lords. He is Britain's leading political novelist and has been a senior adviser to Prime Ministers Margaret Thatcher, John Major and David Cameron. House of Cards was made into an award winning TV series in the UK and for Netflix in the USA, starring Kevin Spacey and Robin Wright and directed by David Fincher.

The Roundtable
11:35 am
Tue May 6, 2014

"The Rise Of The Tudors" By Chris Skidmore

    In his comprehensive history, The Rise of the Tudors, Chris Skidmore chronicles the early story of the Tudors, beginning with the birth of the future Henry VII and following his life through the tumultuous Wars of the Roses, which ended with Henry’s coronation.

The Roundtable
11:35 am
Thu January 2, 2014

"Margaret Thatcher: Power And Personality" By Jonathan Aitken

A strong willed and device of figure in British and International politics- Margaret Thatcher was the longest serving Prime Minister in the 20th century, and the first woman to hold the office. She oversaw Britain’s biggest social and political revolution in its post war history.

Jonathan Aitken, Cabinet administer under Thatcher, and a close family friend of 40 years- had a unique vantage point, and brings new light to many crucial episodes of the Thatcher era. He writes about it in his new book, Margaret Thatcher: Power and Personality.

He speaks about the source of the boundless ambition, and what gave root to her astonishing force of personality.

The Roundtable
11:50 am
Thu October 24, 2013

“Sydney and Violet" by Stephen Klaidman

Largely forgotten today, Sydney and Violet Schiff were ubiquitous, almost Zelig-like figures in the most important literary movement of the twentieth century. Their friendships among the elite of the Modernist writers were remarkable, and their extensive correspondence with T. S. Eliot, Katherine Mansfield, Proust, and many others strongly suggests both intimacy and intellectual equality.

In Sydney and Violet, Stephen Klaidman examines what divides the literary survivors from the victims of taste and time.

Arts & Culture
11:35 am
Wed September 11, 2013

Pauline Black - The Selecter

The Selecter
Credit Yad Jaura

  Formed in the late 1970s in Coventry, England - The Selecter was one of the early acts to sign to 2 Tone Records, home to Madness, The Beat and The Specials. They became an integral part of the emerging ska scene, setting themselves apart from the pack by being one of the only female fronted ska bands. Led by the fashionable and talented Pauline Black, The Selecter released a number of seminal singles on 2 Tone including “On My Radio,” “Three Minute Hero,” and “Missing Words.” A couple of these songs made it on their 1980 debut LP, Too Much Pressure, which charted in the Top 5 in the UK.

On Halloween in 2010, Pauline Black and Arthur “Gaps” Hendrickson celebrated the 30th anniversary of Too Much Pressure with The Selecter performing the album live at the Sinners Day Festival in Belgium. This event kicked off the current revitalized incarnation of the legendary band who has continued to write and release new music. Their latest record, String Theory, came out earlier this year.

Pauline Black was born to an Anglo-Jewish teenage mother and Nigerian father and was adopted and raised by a white middle-aged couple. She wrote about her life and experience discovering her roots in Black By Design: A 2-Tone Memoir.

The Roundtable
10:35 am
Fri August 23, 2013

"The White Princess" by Philippa Gregory

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