europe

4/21/15 Panel

Apr 21, 2015

  The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Today's panelists are WAMC's Alan Chartock, SUNY Albany Journalism Professor and Investigative Professor, Rosemary Armao, and essayist, author, editor and activist - Barbara Smith.

Scheduled topics include: EU Migrant Crisis; Baltimore Arrest Spinal Cord Death; Breast Cancer Numbers; Standardized Testing; 2015 Pulitzer Prizes.

The French Revolution challenged the foundation of the social order in essentially every political structure in Europe. In his new book, Phantom Terror: Political Paranoia and the Creation of the Modern State, 1789-1848, historian Adam Zamoyski examines the years after the French Revolution when conservative governments from Britain to Russia responded to France’s Revolution. With the hope of protecting their own power against the threat of rebellion, they implemented various forces which policed both the speech and actions of civilians.

Although Zamoyski focuses on a fixed period in human history, his novel provides a fascinating insight into how human beings operate when motivated by power.

  The modern-day European Union was crafted in large part to minimize built-in geopolitical tensions that historically have torn it apart.

As George Friedman demonstrates in Flashpoints: The Emerging Crisis In Europe, with a mix of rich history and cultural analysis, that design is failing.

  When Abraham Lincoln delivered the Gettysburg Address in 1863, he had broader aims than simply rallying a war-weary nation. Lincoln realized that the Civil War had taken on a wider significance—that all of Europe and Latin America was watching to see whether the United States, a beleaguered model of democracy, would indeed “perish from the earth.”

In The Cause of All Nations: An International History of the American Civil War, distinguished historian Don H. Doyle explains that the Civil War was viewed abroad as part of a much larger struggle for democracy that spanned the Atlantic Ocean, and had begun with the American and French Revolutions.

12/30/14 Panel

Dec 30, 2014

  The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Today's panelists are WAMC’s Alan Chartock, Associate Editor of the Times Union, Mike Spain, and political consultant Libby Post.

Topics include Afghanistan War ending, Steve Scalise of Louisiana Acknowledges Addressing Racist Group, and the ferry fire off the coast of Greece.

    In the late summer of 1918, after four long years of senseless, stagnant fighting, the Western Front erupted. The bitter four-month struggle that ensued—known as the Hundred Days Campaign—saw some of the bloodiest and most ferocious combat of the Great War, as the Allies grimly worked to break the stalemate in the west and end the conflict that had decimated Europe.

  Europe’s financial fortunes have a major influence on the rest of the world.

In today’s Congressional Corner, Massachusetts Democratic Representative Richard Neal tells WAMC’s Alan Chartock that Ireland is making a slow comeback.

    Europe’s financial fortunes have influenced the world economy for years. In today’s Congressional Corner, Vermont representative Peter Welch and WAMC’s Alan Chartock discuss Welch’s study group on Europe.

Anne Appllebaum is a columnist for The Washington Post and Slate. Her book, Gulag, won the Pulitzer Prize for Nonfiction and was a finalist for three other major prizes. Her essays appear in The New York Review of Books, Slate, and The London Spectator.

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