family

  What would you do if you started to disappear? At the age of 45, friend Laury Sacks - an actress and mother - had a reputation as the quickest wit in the room. At the age of 46, she began forgetting words. Soon she could barely speak.

The documentary film, Looks Like Laury Sounds Like Laury, captures one year in her journey with  frontotemporal dementia, a little-understood disease that strikes people in the prime of life.

Looks Like Laury Sounds Like Laury will screen at the Scoville Memorial Library in Salisbury, CT at 7pm this Friday, April 24th.

Times Union

    

  Family Court is best defined as a “people’s court.” It affects people’s lives on a day to day basis, not just the litigants - but has a ripple effect on children, family members and others and unlike other courts, family court deals with the past, present and the future

Albany County Family Court Judge Sue Kushner joins us this morning to help us understand what Family Court is and does – and of course what it isn’t and what it doesn’t do.

Listener Essay - A Passover Story

Apr 3, 2015

  Tina Lincer is a writer living in Loudonville, NY. 

Listener Essay - Swinging In The Breeze

Apr 1, 2015

  Steve Lewis is a member of the Sarah Lawrence Writing Institute faculty and freelance writer. He has been published in The New York Times, Washington Post, LA Times, The Christian Science Monitor, Spirituality and Health, and a biblically long list of parenting magazines and books (7 kids, 16 grandchildren). He is also a contributing writer for Talking Writing Magazine.

  In her latest novel, After Birth, Elisa Albert writes about motherhood and friendship. The book tells the story of Ari who lives in a town in upstate New York and is supposed to be working on a Ph.D. in women’s studies but she has major postpartum depression.

The book issues a wake-up call to a culture that turns its new mothers into exiles and expects them to act like natives.

  Can You Hear Me Baby? Stories of Sex, Love, and OMG Birth! is being presented as a staged reading with music on March 27th and 28th at Berkshire Theatre Group's Unicorn Theatre in Stockbridge, MA as a benefit for the National Perinatal Association, Berkshire Festival of Women Writers and WAM Theatre.

Written by Lisa Rafel, with music by Lisa Rafel and Gary Malkin, Can You Hear Me Baby? brings together birth stories and original music to dramatize the joy, challenges, personal courage and profundity of birth.

Here to tell us more are playwright Lisa Rafel and the production’s director/producer Jayne Atkinson.

  In Lacy Eye by Jessica Treadway: Hanna and Joe send their awkward daughter Dawn off to college hoping that she will finally "come into her own." When she brings her new boyfriend, Rud, to her sister's wedding, her parents try to suppress their troubling impressions of him for Dawn's sake. Not long after, Hanna and Joe suffer a savage attack at home, resulting in Joe's death and Hanna's severe injury and memory loss.

Rud is convicted of the crime, and the community speculates that Dawn may also have been involved. When Rud wins an appeal and Dawn returns to live in the family home, Hanna resolves to recall that traumatic night so she can testify in the retrial, exonerate her daughter, and keep her husband's murderer in jail.

Jessica Treadway will read from and sign her book at The Book House in Albany, NY tonight at 7pm.

  In recent years, there have been major outbreaks of whooping cough among children in California, mumps in New York, and measles in Ohio’s Amish country—despite the fact that these are all vaccine-preventable diseases.

While America is the most medically advanced place in the world, many people bypass modern medicine in favor of using their faith to fight life threatening illnesses.

According to our next guest, children suffer and die every year from treatable diseases, and in most states it is legal for parents to deny their children care for religious reasons.

Dr. Paul Offit is a Professor of Pediatrics in the Division of Infectious Diseases at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine and Director of the Vaccine Education Center at the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia. His new book is Bad Faith: When Religious Belief Undermines Modern Medicine.

  This coming Saturday, March 7th, The Ashokan Center in Olive Bridge, NY will host their family friendly Maple Fest!

The sugaring tradition goes back to the original Native populations of New York who eventually taught it to European settlers. Maple sugaring season in the Northeast typically begins in mid-February, and lasts through early April.

Tim Neu has been operating the maple sugaring program at the Ashokan Center in Olivebridge, NY for 35 years as part of their Environmental Education Program.

Listener Essay - Year Of The Lion

Feb 26, 2015

  Pamela Ethington is a writer who divides her time between Syracuse, where her home is, and Woodstock, N.Y., where her heart is. Her work has been published in New Millenium Writings. She is a student of author Martha Frankel in Woodstock.

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