family

  In recent years, there have been major outbreaks of whooping cough among children in California, mumps in New York, and measles in Ohio’s Amish country—despite the fact that these are all vaccine-preventable diseases.

While America is the most medically advanced place in the world, many people bypass modern medicine in favor of using their faith to fight life threatening illnesses.

According to our next guest, children suffer and die every year from treatable diseases, and in most states it is legal for parents to deny their children care for religious reasons.

Dr. Paul Offit is a Professor of Pediatrics in the Division of Infectious Diseases at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine and Director of the Vaccine Education Center at the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia. His new book is Bad Faith: When Religious Belief Undermines Modern Medicine.

  This coming Saturday, March 7th, The Ashokan Center in Olive Bridge, NY will host their family friendly Maple Fest!

The sugaring tradition goes back to the original Native populations of New York who eventually taught it to European settlers. Maple sugaring season in the Northeast typically begins in mid-February, and lasts through early April.

Tim Neu has been operating the maple sugaring program at the Ashokan Center in Olivebridge, NY for 35 years as part of their Environmental Education Program.

Listener Essay - Year Of The Lion

Feb 26, 2015

  Pamela Ethington is a writer who divides her time between Syracuse, where her home is, and Woodstock, N.Y., where her heart is. Her work has been published in New Millenium Writings. She is a student of author Martha Frankel in Woodstock.

  The new book: Journeys Home: Inspiring Stories, Plus Tips & Strategies to Find Your Family History spotlights genealogical travel. The book opens with a personal journey to Ireland as recounted by featured author, actor, television director and award-winning travel writer Andrew McCarthy. Following McCarthy’s story are 25 intriguing personal narratives from other contributors.

Whether the contributors are looking to meet unknown relatives for the first time, unravel family mysteries, walk in the treacherous footsteps of ancestors or return as an adult to a place they fled as a child, each pilgrimage is linked by the common desire to know one’s past in order to reconnect and gain a sense of belonging.

Andrew McCarthy is known for his roles in the 1980s films St. Elmo’s Fire, Mannequin, Weekend at Bernie’s, Pretty in Pink and Less Than Zero. He also has an illustrious writing career. He is an editor-at-large at National Geographic Traveler magazine. His 2012 memoir, The Longest Way Home, became a New York Times best-seller.

Listener Essay - My Long Lost Friend

Jan 27, 2015

  

  Albert Stern's stories have appeared in the New York Times, Salon.com, Nerve.com, and the Jewish Daily Forward. He lives in Berkshire County, and works as a tutor, editor, and writing coach.

  

  A child of the Rhodesian wars and daughter of two deeply complicated parents, Alexandra Fuller is no stranger to pain. But the disintegration of Fuller’s own marriage leaves her shattered. Looking to pick up the pieces of her life, she finally confronts the tough questions about her past, about the American man she married, and about the family she left behind in Africa.

Fuller’s new memoir is: Leaving Before the Rains Come. It begins with the dreadful first years of the American financial crisis when Fuller’s delicate balance—between American pragmatism and African fatalism, the linchpin of her unorthodox marriage—irrevocably fails.

Recalling her unusual courtship in Zambia—elephant attacks on the first date, sick with malaria on the wedding day—Fuller struggles to understand her younger self as she overcomes her current misfortunes.

  In Descent: A Novel by Tim Johnston, the Rocky Mountains have cast their spell over the Courtlands, a young family from the plains taking a last summer vacation before their daughter begins college. For eighteen-year-old Caitlin, the mountains loom as the ultimate test of her runner’s heart, while her parents hope that so much beauty, so much grandeur, will somehow repair a damaged marriage. But when Caitlin and her younger brother, Sean, go out for an early morning run and only Sean returns, the mountains become as terrifying as they are majestic, as suddenly this family find themselves living the kind of nightmare they’ve only read about in headlines or seen on TV.

    Finding the right caregiver can be one of the most life-changing decisions a parent makes. Whether it's a kindly neighbor for the weekday latchkey hours, a teenage babysitter one night a week, or a full-time professional nanny, the right caregiver can enrich a child's world and literally grow her brain. Hire the wrong one, and this person could cause developmental delays and stress for the entire family.

In her new book, Secrets of the Nanny Whisperer: A Practical Guide for Finding and Achieving the Gold Standard of Care for Your Child, nationally recognized parenting expert Tammy Gold draws from her extensive background in child developmental psychology, social work, and family therapy to offer the first childcare bible for parents.

  Already the biological parents of a seven-year-old son and a five-year-old daughter, Claude Knobler and his wife decided to adopt Nati, a five-year-old Ethiopian boy who seemed different from Knobler in every conceivable way.

In his book, More Love, Less Panic: 7 Lessons I Learned About Life, Love, and Parenting After We Adopted Our Son from Ethiopia, explains how his experiences raising Nati led him to learn a lesson that applied equally well to parenting his biological children: It’s essential to spend the time we are given with our children to love them and enjoy them, rather than push and mold them into who we think they should be.

    Dinaw Mengestu’s work, including his first two novels, have earned him incredible critical acclaim as well as a MacArthur Foundation genius grant and selection by the New Yorker as one of their “20 Under 40” young writers central to their generation. And writing about his new novel, All Our Names, Kirkus Reviews calls Mengestu, “among the best novelists now at work in America.”

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