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The Roundtable
11:12 am
Thu December 5, 2013

Actor Michael Zegen In "Bad Jews"

Molly Ranson, Tracee Chimo, and Michael Zegen in "Bad Jews"
Credit Joan Marcus

The Roundabout Theatre Company’s Roundabout Underground program gives productions to emerging playwrights. Last year, they had a hit with Bad Jews - a play by Joshua Harmon, directed by Daniel Aukin.

The show did so well in their 62-seat Black Box Theatre, in fact, that they brought it back to run in the Laura Pels Theatre (their bigger-small space) as part of their season this year - where it continues to earn excellent reviews and enthusiastic response from audiences.

In the play a young Jewish woman, Diana (played by Tracee Chimo, she prefers to be called by her Hebrew name, Daphna) fights with her cousin, Liam, to get a religious relic left behind by their recently deceased grandfather - who had kept it safe during his years in a concentration camp by holding it beneath his tongue. Liam’s brother (Jonah, played by Philip Ettinger) and girlfriend (Melody, played by Molly Ranson) observe and reluctantly weigh-in as Daphna and Liam argue and insult-sling as only family can.

Michael Zegen plays Liam in Bad Jews. Zegen attended Skidmore College and his other Off-Broadway credits include Liz Meriwether’s Oliver Parker! and Greg Moss’ punkplay. On television he’s been featured in recurring roles on The Walking Dead, Boardwalk Empire, How to Make It in America, Rescue Me, and he’ll appear in the upcoming season of the HBO hit, Girls. His film credits include Adventureland, Taking Woodstock, and Frances Ha.

The Roundtable
10:10 am
Thu December 5, 2013

"Finding Grandma" With Mary Beth Wenger

    Author Mary Beth Wenger, longtime Albany-area TV news anchor and reporter, joins us this morning to discuss her new book, Finding Grandma: A Sentimental Journey Through 1920s Columbia County Recipes.

The book is the story of Wenger's search for the grandmother she never knew. Stumbling over a hidden legacy left behind by Grandma Edna in an authentic 1920s recipe collection, she embarked on a voyage of discovery.

The turn of every crumbling, yellowed page unlocked mysteries, as she uncovered recipes either handwritten or snipped from newspapers, often affixed with straight pins to the pages! This was an unexpected springboard into the past, spurring a nostalgic journey that jumps back and forth from the 1920s to today.

The Roundtable
11:35 am
Wed December 4, 2013

"Far From The Tree: Parents, Children And The Search For Identity" By Andrew Solomon

Far From the Tree: Parents, Children and the Search for Identity, Andrew Solomon’s book on parents, children and the bond between them and the cases of extreme difference - was published to ecstatic acclaim last year - landing on best-seller lists across the country, and "Best of" lists from The New York Times, Amazon, The Economist and more.

The book has now been released in paperback. Solomon opens Far From the Tree with an autobiographical chapter detailing his experience as a gay son of heterosexual parents. At the time of his youth, homosexuality was considered an illness and a crime. The book is about the struggle for those who are different and their need to find their own identity.

The Roundtable
10:35 am
Wed November 27, 2013

Listener Essay - One Thanksgiving

  Lynn Elliot Francis has studied privately with authors in upstate New York, where she lives, and at Bread Loaf Writers' Conference in Ripton, Vermont.

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The Roundtable
11:20 am
Tue November 26, 2013

Listener Essay - The Maccabees And Me: The Miracle Of Reinventing Hanukkah

  Tina Lincer is a writer living in Loudonville, NY.

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The Roundtable
10:30 am
Mon November 25, 2013

Listener Essay - A Thanksgiving Paradox

  Kate Cohen is a writer and editor in Albany, New York.

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The Roundtable
10:45 am
Thu October 24, 2013

"The Astor Orphan: A Memoir" by Alexandra Aldrich

    The Astor Orphan: A Memoir is a memoir by a direct descendant of John Jacob Astor, Alexandra Aldrich.

In it, she tells the story of her eccentric, fractured family; her 1980s childhood of bohemian neglect in the squalid attic of Rokeby, the family’s Hudson Valley Mansion; and her escape from the clan. Aldrich reaches back to the Gilded Age when the Astor legacy began to come undone, leaving the Aldrich branch of the family penniless and squabbling over what was left.

The Roundtable
10:10 am
Fri October 18, 2013

Choosing Heroes, Friends, Life - "Survival Lessons" From Alice Hoffman

    In Survival Lessons, Alice Hoffman - one of America's most beloved writers - shares her suggestions for finding beauty in the world even during the toughest times.

Wise, gentle, and wry, Alice Hoffman teaches all of us how to choose what matters most.

The Roundtable
10:35 am
Wed October 16, 2013

“My Brother My Sister: Story Of A Transformation” By Molly Haskell

Feminist film critic and author Molly Haskell was disoriented -to say the least- when her brother told her he had “gender dysphoria” and was going to transition from male to female.

She shares the story of their experience in My Brother My Sister.

The Roundtable
10:35 am
Thu October 3, 2013

"The Geography of Memory: A Pilgrimage Through Alzheimer's" By Jeanne Murray Walker

    Award-winning poet Jeanne Murray Walker tells an extraordinarily wise, witty, and quietly wrenching tale of her mother's long passage into dementia.

This powerful story explores parental love, profound grief, and the unexpected consolation of memory.

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