Tina Lincer is a writer living in Loudonville, NY.

Listener Essay - A Thanksgiving Paradox

Nov 25, 2013

  Kate Cohen is a writer and editor in Albany, New York.

    The Astor Orphan: A Memoir is a memoir by a direct descendant of John Jacob Astor, Alexandra Aldrich.

In it, she tells the story of her eccentric, fractured family; her 1980s childhood of bohemian neglect in the squalid attic of Rokeby, the family’s Hudson Valley Mansion; and her escape from the clan. Aldrich reaches back to the Gilded Age when the Astor legacy began to come undone, leaving the Aldrich branch of the family penniless and squabbling over what was left.

    In Survival Lessons, Alice Hoffman - one of America's most beloved writers - shares her suggestions for finding beauty in the world even during the toughest times.

Wise, gentle, and wry, Alice Hoffman teaches all of us how to choose what matters most.

Feminist film critic and author Molly Haskell was disoriented -to say the least- when her brother told her he had “gender dysphoria” and was going to transition from male to female.

She shares the story of their experience in My Brother My Sister.

    Award-winning poet Jeanne Murray Walker tells an extraordinarily wise, witty, and quietly wrenching tale of her mother's long passage into dementia.

This powerful story explores parental love, profound grief, and the unexpected consolation of memory.

  The documentary feature film, Breastmilk is screening as part of the upcoming Woodstock Film Festival.

Despite endless research on the benefits of breastfeeding, the stigma surrounding the natural practice has led to a new world of motherhood where maternity confronts sexuality and naturalists are confront a culture of baby formula, breast pumps and skepticism. The film features a wide range of frank and revealing interviews with breastfeeding women as they addresses the many questions around breast milk.

First time director/producer Dana Ben-Ari joins us now to talk about her experience making the film.

Essay - Five Years Later

Sep 12, 2013

  Steve Lewis is a member of the Sarah Lawrence Writing Institute faculty and freelance writer. He has been published in The New York Times, Washington Post, LA Times, The Christian Science Monitor, Spirituality and Health, and a biblically long list of parenting magazines and books (7 kids, 16 grandchildren). He is also a contributing writer for Talking Writing Magazine.

    We are very happy to continue our new regular feature on The Roundtable, entitled – Ideas Matter: Checking in with the Public Humanities. It is our chance to check in with the Humanities Councils throughout our 7-State area to discuss important ideas and why they do indeed matter.

This morning we spotlight MASS Humanities and their Family Adventures in Reading program. The idea is to explore diversity, knowing about the world; children responding to humanities themes through literature and illustration. The program emphasizes the importance of adult-child interaction with reading and conversation.

To discuss, we welcome, Mary Jo Maichack - a national award-winning singer, storyteller and creative teaching artist; and Hayley Wood - a Senior program Officer at Mass Humanities. She is the editor of Mass Humanities' blog, The Public Humanist and she manages Family Adventures in Reading.

    Today’s children are glued not only to the television set, but to tablets, computers, and other electronic devices. Millions of parents and educators have turned to Jim Trelease’s beloved classic to help countless children become avid readers and to improve their language skills.

There is an updated edition of The Read-Aloud Handbook that discusses the benefits, the rewards, and the importance of reading aloud to children of a new generation.