farce


  Mischief Theatre’s The Play That Goes Wrong has been doing so on Broadway since March of this year.

 

In the play, it’s opening night of The Murder at Haversham Manor where things are quickly going from bad to utterly disastrous. With an unconscious leading lady, a corpse that can’t play dead, and actors who trip over everything (including their lines) - the mad-cap romp meticulously disintegrates at The Lyceum Theatre on 45th Street.

Winner of the Tony Award for Best Scenic Design of a Play, The Play That Goes Wrong is directed by Mark Bell and written by Henry Lewis, Jonathan Sayer, and Henry Shields. Lewis, Sayer, and Shields also star -- and two of the actor/co-creators -- Henry Lewis and Jonathan Sayer - sat down with us in New York City.

In Arsenic & Old Lace, good-hearted drama critic, Mortimer Brewster appears to lead a normal, happy life. Recently engaged to be married, Mortimer plans a trip to visit his charming, spinster aunts, Abby and Martha Brewster. However, shortly after Mortimer’s arrival, he discovers that his innocent aunts have a deadly secret buried in the basement—about a dozen older gentlemen.

Berkshire Theatre Group presents the play, by Joseph Kesselring directed by Gregg Edelman, on the Fitzpatrick Mainstage through August 19th.

The production stars Harriet Harris as Abby, Mia Dillon as Martha, and Graham Rowat at Mortimer.

Kevin Sprague

  The Liar was originally penned by the classic 17th Century playwright Pierre Corneille, in 1664. The play as all of the ingredients of a perfect French farce - a tangled web of lies, misdirected advances, and the unmistakable confusion of love.

Shakespeare and Company is producing an adaptation by award-winning American playwright, David Ives, which merges the iambic humor of classic verse with a contemporary twist.

We are joined by director Kevin G. Coleman and actors David Joseph and Alexandra Lincoln.

Joan Marcus, 2012

Adam James stars as Bernard in the John Tillinger directed farce, Don't Dress For Dinner (written by Marc Camoletti, adapted by Robin Hawdon, produced by Roundabout Theatre Company) currently running at The American Airlines Theatre on West 42nd Street in New York City. Here we speak with Adam James about his stage career, some notable TV spots, and the tricks of successfully performing farce.