FDR

Two weeks before the New York primary, the Dutchess County executive has invited all the presidential candidates to stop in his county for a town hall-style event, saying the county’s history is reason alone to come.

  Pauli Murray has been called one of the most important figures in 20th century African American civil rights history. This remarkable woman was the granddaughter of a mulatto slave who among other achievements was a founding member of CORE, graduated at the top of her class at Howard University School of Law, was named Madame Moiselle Magazine women of the year in 1947, wrote states laws on race and color which Thurgood Marshall called "the bible of civil rights lawyers," was appointed to JFK’s commission on the status of women and co-founded national organization for women in 1966. Murray is now the subject of Patricia Bell-Scott’s biography The Firebrand and First Lady: Portrait of a Friendship: Pauli Murray, Eleanor Roosevelt and the Struggle for Social Justice. Patricia Bell-Scott is professor emerita of women studies in human development and family science at the University of Georgia. 

A child of wealth and privilege possessing unlimited will and ambition, Franklin Delano Roosevelt, seemed destined for the presidency. The nation he lead was large in population, rich in resources, committed to a universal ideology of liberal democracy, and destined for grand geopolitical power. A man and a nation were each poised on the brink of greatness. FDR's twelve years in The White House culminated in what can justly be called an 'American century'. This convergence of individual and national destinies created a large and complex story that remains essential to our understanding the world in which we live in today. 

This is a picture of President Franklin Delano Roosevelt
wikipedia.org

On January 6, 1941 President Franklin Delano Roosevelt’s delivered his “Four Freedoms” speech to Congress as the nation grappled with entering World War II. Seventy five years later two area museums are commemorating the anniversary of ideals laid out by our nation’s longest-serving president.

  Reeling from the Great Depression, the United States and Germany elected two new leaders of diametrically opposing ideologies. In 1932, Franklin Roosevelt won the presidency and Adolf Hitler became chancellor.

Author and historian David Pietrusza will discuss his new book - 1932: The Rise of Hitler and FDR–Two Tales of Politics, Betrayal, and Unlikely Destiny.

Courtesy of the Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library & Museum

President Franklin D. Roosevelt's entire collection of speeches is now available online.

Courtesy of the Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library & Museum

  An effort is underway in Saratoga Springs to obtain funding to rebuild a Depression-era bathhouse and re-open it as a wellness center. 


FDR Goes Digital

Jun 22, 2015
Composite image by Dave Lucas

In commemoration of the 71st anniversary of the signing of the G.I. Bill, the Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library and Museum and the Roosevelt Institute are launching a special digitization project in partnership with AT&T.

  We’re often told that the United States is, was, and always has been a Christian nation. But in One Nation Under God, historian Kevin M. Kruse reveals that the idea of “Christian America” is an invention—and a relatively recent one at that.

As Kruse argues, the belief that America is fundamentally and formally a Christian nation originated in the 1930s when businessmen enlisted religious activists in their fight against FDR’s New Deal. Corporations from General Motors to Hilton Hotels bankrolled conservative clergymen, encouraging them to attack the New Deal as a program of “pagan statism” that perverted the central principle of Christianity: the sanctity and salvation of the individual. Their campaign for “freedom under God” culminated in the election of their close ally Dwight Eisenhower in 1952.

Author Karen Chase Discusses Her Memoir

Nov 6, 2014
Courtesy of Karen Chase

Karen Chase chronicles her childhood with polio and talks about the 1950s polio outbreak in the U.S. as part of her memoir, Polio Boulevard. Her book comes during the same year the nation marked the 60th anniversary of Dr. Jonas Salk’s polio vaccine. WAMC’s Hudson Valley Bureau Chief Allison Dunne spoke with Chase about her book and kinship with Franklin Roosevelt.

Karen Chase will be at the FDR Presidential Library and Museum Thursday, November 6 at 7 p.m. for a book talk and signing. She also speaks at Sheffield Local Authors Day on November 15.

After his recent death, we present an encore interview with WAMC's Alan Chartock In Conversation with Joseph Persico about his book - Roosevelt's Centurions.

    We are very happy to continue our weekly feature on the RT, entitled – Ideas Matter: Checking in with the Public Humanities. It is our chance to check in with the Humanities Councils throughout our 7-State area to discuss important ideas and why they do indeed matter.

As we head into the Labor Day weekend, we take a look at the history of this holiday by talking with Jeff Urbin, Education Specialist at Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library and Museum about what Labor Day meant during the FDR administration.

WAMC, Allison Dunne

A documentary on the Roosevelts by Oscar-nominated and Emmy Award-winning filmmaker Ken Burns airs on PBS in September. Burns was at the Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library and Museum in Hyde Park earlier this summer where WAMC’s Hudson Valley Bureau Chief Allison Dunne caught up with him.

  While Franklin Delano Roosevelt’s first hundred days may be the most celebrated period of his presidency, the months before the attack on Pearl Harbor proved the most critical. Beginning as early as 1939 when Germany first attacked Poland, Roosevelt skillfully navigated a host of challenges—a reluctant population, an unprepared military, and disagreements within his cabinet—to prepare the country for its inevitable confrontation with the Axis.

In No End Save Victory, esteemed historian David Kaiser draws on extensive archival research to reveal the careful preparations that enabled the United States to win World War II.

James Tobin writes in his new biography of Franklin Delano Roosevelt: "It is a truism to say Roosevelt overcame polio to become President. It is just as accurate to say that Roosevelt would not have been the President he became, probably would not have been President at all, had it not been for the germ that had infected him in 1921."

National Book Critic Circle Award winner James Tobin, author of the acclaimed Ernie Pyle’s War, writes in his detailed account of the defining event of Franklin Delano Roosevelt’s life, and the greatest comeback in America’s political history.

Courtesy of the Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library & Museum

There’s a new archive being launched Wednesday at an historical location in New York’s Hudson Valley.

    In Young Mr. Roosevelt, acclaimed historian Stanley Weintraub evokes Franklin Delano Roosevelt’s political and wartime beginnings. An unpromising patrician playboy appointed assistant secretary of the Navy in 1913, Roosevelt learned quickly and rose to national visibility in World War I.

Democratic vice-presidential nominee in 1920, he lost the election but not his ambitions. While his stature was rising, his testy marriage to his cousin Eleanor was fraying amid scandal quietly covered up. Even polio a year later would not suppress his inevitable ascent.

Stanley Weintraub will talk about his new book at the FDR Presidential Library and Museum on Sunday, November 3 at 2pm.

    All American presidents are commanders in chief by law. Not all have performed as such in practice. In his new book, in Roosevelt’s Centurions, distinguished historian Joseph Persico reveals how, during World War II, Franklin Roosevelt seized the levers of wartime power like no president since Abraham Lincoln during the Civil War.

Prior to beginning his career as a historian and biographer, Joseph Persico was chief speechwriter for New York governor and later U.S. vice president, Nelson A. Rockefeller. He has written 13-books, including many about FDR and the Roosevelt era – including: Roosevelt’s Secret War: FDR and World War II Espionage and Franklin and Lucy: FDR and the Remarkable Women in His Life.

  The Roosevelt Library remains the premier research center in the world for study and research on the 32nd President of the United States. It contains more than 17-million pages of documents. The library is a critical historical resource and educational destination used by scholars, researchers and historians.

Historian Douglas Brinkley is a scholar, author, and sought-after news commentator. He is a professor of history and Baker Institute Fellow at Rice University and has written books on Theodore Roosevelt, Franklin Roosevelt, John F. Kennedy, Jimmy Carter and Ronald Reagan. His new book is on FDR and why we are lucky enough to have him join us this morning.

    While the renovation of the museum is an amazing achievement, it is important to realize the revitalization also includes new and exciting permanent museum exhibits.

These exhibits tell the story of the Roosevelt Presidency beginning in the depths of the Great Depression and continuing through the New Deal and WWII with an emphasis on both Franklin and Eleanor Roosevelt’s relationship with the American people.

Lynn Bassanese, Director of the FDR Presidential Library and Museum and Museum Curator, Herman Eberhardt join us.

    Lynn Bassanese began working at FDR Presidential Library and Museum as part-time archives aides in 1972 while a student at nearby Marist College. She is now the director of the library and museum and has largely overseen this $35 million, nine-year restoration and redesign project that we are celebrating this morning.

She was also front and center at yesterday’s rededication here at America’s first Presidential Library and the only one used by a sitting President.

    The Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library and Museum in Hyde Park, New York is in the midst of their countdown to the public opening of the Roosevelt Library's new permanent museum exhibits on June 30th.

  The Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library and Museum in Hyde Park, New York is in the midst of their countdown to the public opening of the Roosevelt Library's new permanent museum exhibits on June 30th.

These exhibits will tell the story of the Roosevelt presidency beginning in the depths of the Great Depression and continuing through the New Deal years and World War II with an emphasis on both Franklin and Eleanor Roosevelt’s relationship with the American people. Special inter-actives, immersive audio‐visual theaters, and rarely seen artifacts will convey the dramatic story of the Roosevelt era as the Roosevelt Library brings a New Deal to a New Generation.

To talk specifically about the upcoming audiovisual presentations, we welcome Herman Eberhardt, Supervisory Museum Curator for the Roosevelt Library and Steve Bressler, President of Monadnock Media.

Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library and Museum

    On Friday, the Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library and Museum in Hyde Park, New York kicked off their "100 Days" Countdown to the public opening of the Roosevelt Library's new permanent museum exhibits on June 30th. Today marks 97 days.

These exhibits will tell the story of the Roosevelt presidency beginning in the depths of the Great Depression and continuing through the New Deal years and World War II with an emphasis on both Franklin and Eleanor Roosevelt’s relationship with the American people. Special interactives, immersive audio‐visual theaters, and rarely seen artifacts will convey the dramatic story of the Roosevelt era as the Roosevelt Library brings a New Deal to a New Generation.

To help us countdown, we welcome Lynn Bassanese, Director of the FDR Presidential Library and Museum and Felica Wong, President and CEO of the Roosevelt Institute.

    Redefining our traditional understanding of the New Deal, the new book, Fear Itself, examines this pivotal American era through a sweeping international lens that juxtaposes a struggling democracy with enticing ideologies like Fascism and Communism.

Rob Edelman: “Perfect” Politicians

Sep 24, 2012

With the election of a U.S. president much in the news, one soon-to-be-released film takes on extra-special resonance. That film is HYDE PARK ON HUDSON, which was screened at the Toronto Film Festival and is scheduled to open theatrically in December.