FDR

FDR Goes Digital

Jun 22, 2015
Composite image by Dave Lucas

In commemoration of the 71st anniversary of the signing of the G.I. Bill, the Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library and Museum and the Roosevelt Institute are launching a special digitization project in partnership with AT&T.

  We’re often told that the United States is, was, and always has been a Christian nation. But in One Nation Under God, historian Kevin M. Kruse reveals that the idea of “Christian America” is an invention—and a relatively recent one at that.

As Kruse argues, the belief that America is fundamentally and formally a Christian nation originated in the 1930s when businessmen enlisted religious activists in their fight against FDR’s New Deal. Corporations from General Motors to Hilton Hotels bankrolled conservative clergymen, encouraging them to attack the New Deal as a program of “pagan statism” that perverted the central principle of Christianity: the sanctity and salvation of the individual. Their campaign for “freedom under God” culminated in the election of their close ally Dwight Eisenhower in 1952.

Author Karen Chase Discusses Her Memoir

Nov 6, 2014
Courtesy of Karen Chase

Karen Chase chronicles her childhood with polio and talks about the 1950s polio outbreak in the U.S. as part of her memoir, Polio Boulevard. Her book comes during the same year the nation marked the 60th anniversary of Dr. Jonas Salk’s polio vaccine. WAMC’s Hudson Valley Bureau Chief Allison Dunne spoke with Chase about her book and kinship with Franklin Roosevelt.

Karen Chase will be at the FDR Presidential Library and Museum Thursday, November 6 at 7 p.m. for a book talk and signing. She also speaks at Sheffield Local Authors Day on November 15.

After his recent death, we present an encore interview with WAMC's Alan Chartock In Conversation with Joseph Persico about his book - Roosevelt's Centurions.

    We are very happy to continue our weekly feature on the RT, entitled – Ideas Matter: Checking in with the Public Humanities. It is our chance to check in with the Humanities Councils throughout our 7-State area to discuss important ideas and why they do indeed matter.

As we head into the Labor Day weekend, we take a look at the history of this holiday by talking with Jeff Urbin, Education Specialist at Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library and Museum about what Labor Day meant during the FDR administration.

WAMC, Allison Dunne

A documentary on the Roosevelts by Oscar-nominated and Emmy Award-winning filmmaker Ken Burns airs on PBS in September. Burns was at the Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library and Museum in Hyde Park earlier this summer where WAMC’s Hudson Valley Bureau Chief Allison Dunne caught up with him.

  While Franklin Delano Roosevelt’s first hundred days may be the most celebrated period of his presidency, the months before the attack on Pearl Harbor proved the most critical. Beginning as early as 1939 when Germany first attacked Poland, Roosevelt skillfully navigated a host of challenges—a reluctant population, an unprepared military, and disagreements within his cabinet—to prepare the country for its inevitable confrontation with the Axis.

In No End Save Victory, esteemed historian David Kaiser draws on extensive archival research to reveal the careful preparations that enabled the United States to win World War II.

James Tobin writes in his new biography of Franklin Delano Roosevelt: "It is a truism to say Roosevelt overcame polio to become President. It is just as accurate to say that Roosevelt would not have been the President he became, probably would not have been President at all, had it not been for the germ that had infected him in 1921."

National Book Critic Circle Award winner James Tobin, author of the acclaimed Ernie Pyle’s War, writes in his detailed account of the defining event of Franklin Delano Roosevelt’s life, and the greatest comeback in America’s political history.

Courtesy of the Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library & Museum

There’s a new archive being launched Wednesday at an historical location in New York’s Hudson Valley.

    In Young Mr. Roosevelt, acclaimed historian Stanley Weintraub evokes Franklin Delano Roosevelt’s political and wartime beginnings. An unpromising patrician playboy appointed assistant secretary of the Navy in 1913, Roosevelt learned quickly and rose to national visibility in World War I.

Democratic vice-presidential nominee in 1920, he lost the election but not his ambitions. While his stature was rising, his testy marriage to his cousin Eleanor was fraying amid scandal quietly covered up. Even polio a year later would not suppress his inevitable ascent.

Stanley Weintraub will talk about his new book at the FDR Presidential Library and Museum on Sunday, November 3 at 2pm.

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