FDR Presidential Library

Julie Otsuka’s novel, When the Emperor Was Divine , is about the internment of a Japanese-American family during World War II, as a result of FDR’s Executive Order 9066. 

The book is based on Otsuka’s own family history: her grandfather was arrested by the FBI as a suspected spy for Japan the day after Pearl Harbor was bombed, and her mother, uncle, and grandmother spent three years in an internment camp in Topaz, Utah. 

Otsuka will be speaking about the book at a Poughkeepsie Public Library event held at the FDR Presidential Library and Museum in Hyde Park on Sunday, February 26th @ 2PM .

In 1932, as her husband assumed the presidency, Eleanor Roosevelt entered the claustrophobic, duty-bound existence of the First Lady with dread. By that time, she had put her deep disappointment in her marriage behind her and developed an independent life—now threatened by the public role she would be forced to play. A lifeline came to her in the form of a feisty campaign reporter for the Associated Press: Lorena Hickok. Over the next thirty years, until Eleanor’s death, the two women carried on an extraordinary relationship: They were, at different points, lovers, confidantes, professional advisors, and caring friends.

Susan Quinn has written a book about their unique relationship entitled Eleanor and Hick: The Love Affair That Shaped a First Lady

Susan Quinn is the author of Furious Improvisation: How the WPA and a Cast of Thousands Made High Art Out of Desperate Times and Marie Curie: A Life, among other books. Her work has appeared in The New York Times Magazine, the Atlantic, and other publications. She is the former president of PEN New England.

Seventy-five years ago tomorrow, Americans gathered around their radios as President Franklin Roosevelt spoke to Congress 24 hours after the nation was stunned by the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor. That "Day of Infamy" speech, FDR's first inaugural address and a number of other talks by the president are being restored and digitized by the FDR Presidential Library and Museum in Hyde Park. The library's director, Paul Sparrow, says the project is a partnership with AT&T and the National Archives and Records Administration.

The new book: Eleanor Roosevelt, Volume 3: The War Years And After, 1939-1962 Is the final volume in Blanche Wiesen Cook’s definitive biography of one of America’s greatest first ladies. Historians, politicians and critics have praised Blanche Wiesen Cook’s biography of Eleanor Roosevelt as the essential portrait of a woman who towers over the twentieth century.

Eleanor Roosevelt, Volume 3 follows the arc of war and the evolution of a marriage, as the first lady realized the cost of maintaining her principles even as the country and her husband were not prepared to adopt them. Eleanor Roosevelt continued to struggle for her core issues—economic security, New Deal reforms, racial equality, and rescue—when they were sidelined by FDR while he marshaled the country through war.

The chasm between Eleanor and Franklin grew, and the strains on their relationship were as political as they were personal. These years—the war years—made Eleanor Roosevelt the woman she became: leader, visionary, guiding light. Blanche Wiesen Cook is a distinguished professor of history at John Jay College and Graduate Center at the City University of New York. 

FDR's Right-Hand Woman

Sep 8, 2016

  The FDR Presidential Library will host an author talk and book signing at 7:00 p.m. on Thursday, September 8, 2016 with Kathryn Smith author of The Gatekeeper: Missy LeHand, FDR, and the Untold Story of the Partnership That Defined a Presidency.

Widely considered the first female presidential chief of staff, Marguerite “Missy” LeHand was the right-hand woman to Franklin Delano Roosevelt—both personally and professionally—for more than twenty years. Although her official title as personal secretary was relatively humble, her power and influence were unparalleled. Everyone in the White House knew one truth: If you wanted access to Franklin, you had to get through Missy. She was one of his most trusted advisors, affording her a unique perspective on the president that no one else could claim, and she was deeply admired and respected by Eleanor and the Roosevelt children.

This is a picture of President Franklin Delano Roosevelt
wikipedia.org

On January 6, 1941 President Franklin Delano Roosevelt’s delivered his “Four Freedoms” speech to Congress as the nation grappled with entering World War II. Seventy five years later two area museums are commemorating the anniversary of ideals laid out by our nation’s longest-serving president.

Courtesy of the Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library & Museum

President Franklin D. Roosevelt's entire collection of speeches is now available online.

FDR Goes Digital

Jun 22, 2015
Composite image by Dave Lucas

In commemoration of the 71st anniversary of the signing of the G.I. Bill, the Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library and Museum and the Roosevelt Institute are launching a special digitization project in partnership with AT&T.

FDR Site Hosts Women And Climate Change Summit

Mar 6, 2015
NASA

The Environmental Protection Agency is hosting a women’s history event Friday at the FDR site in Dutchess County. WAMC’s Allison Dunne has more. 

    Madeleine Albright served under President Clinton as U.S. Ambassador to The United Nations beginning in 1993. In 1997 she was appointed Secretary of State, at that time she was the highest ranking woman in the history of the U.S. government. During her years as Secretary, Albright became known for wearing a wide variety of distinctive brooches that conveyed her views about the diplomatic or political situation at hand.

Now, the traveling exhibition Read My Pins: The Madeleine Albright Collection, is on display at the Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library and Museum in Hyde Park, NY.

    We are very happy to continue our weekly feature on the RT, entitled – Ideas Matter: Checking in with the Public Humanities. It is our chance to check in with the Humanities Councils throughout our 7-State area to discuss important ideas and why they do indeed matter.

As we head into the Labor Day weekend, we take a look at the history of this holiday by talking with Jeff Urbin, Education Specialist at Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library and Museum about what Labor Day meant during the FDR administration.

WAMC, Allison Dunne

A documentary on the Roosevelts by Oscar-nominated and Emmy Award-winning filmmaker Ken Burns airs on PBS in September. Burns was at the Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library and Museum in Hyde Park earlier this summer where WAMC’s Hudson Valley Bureau Chief Allison Dunne caught up with him.

Courtesy of the Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library & Museum

There’s a new archive being launched Wednesday at an historical location in New York’s Hudson Valley.