fiction

#1 New York Times–bestselling author Robin Cook is the master of the medical thriller and this year marks the 40thanniversary of his breakthrough novel Coma, which changed the public’s image of medicine.

Now in his new thriller, CharlatansCook is back with another blend of cutting edge science, technology, and suspense. 

Elizabeth Strout is the Pulitzer Prize–winning author of Olive Kitteridge; the #1 New York Times bestseller My Name Is Lucy Barton; The Burgess Boys, a New York Timesbestseller; Abide with Me, a national bestseller and Book Sense pick; and Amy and Isabelle, which won the Los Angeles Times Art Seidenbaum Award for First Fiction and the Chicago Tribune Heartland Prize. She has also been a finalist for the PEN/Faulkner Award and the Orange Prize in England. Her short stories have been published in a number of magazines, including The New Yorker and O: The Oprah Magazine.

She joins us to discuss her latest novel, Anything is Possible.

In her new novel, Touch, author Courtney Maum tells the story of a leading trend forecaster who suddenly finds herself in the position of wanting to overturn her own predictions.

Maum examines the issues of technology, family, and artificial intelligence in a sophisticated and very entertaining way. 

Alexandra Silber is an actress and singer who starred most recently as Tzeitel in the Broadway revival of Fiddler on the Roof. She earlier played Hodel in the same show in London’s West End. She has now written – After Anatevka: A Novel Inspired by Fiddler on the Roof - that imagines what happens to the characters of the musical after the curtain falls.

Alexandra Silber picks up where Fiddler left off. Second-eldest daughter Hodel takes center stage as she attempts to join her Socialist-leaning fiancé Perchik to the outer reaches of a Siberian work camp. But before Hodel and Perchik can finally be together, they both face extraordinary hurdles and adversaries—both personal and political—attempting to keep them apart at all costs.

Silber will be talking about and signing her book on Wednesday at 6PM at Oblong Books and Music in Rhinebeck. 

John Grisham has sold more than 300 million copies of his books and has had 29 consecutive No. 1 books on the New York Times fiction bestsellers list.

His latest novel, Camino Island, is about a heist of the original manuscripts of F. Scott Fitzgerald's novels and the efforts to retrieve them.

Caitriona Lally studied English Literature in Trinity College Dublin.  She has had a colorful employment history, working as an abstract writer and a copywriter alongside working as a home helper in New York and an English teacher in Japan.

She was shortlisted for 'Newcomer of the Year' in the Irish Book Awards in 2015 for her novel, Eggshells.

In thriller writer Lisa Scottoline’s latest novel, One Perfect Lie, we meet Chris Brennan, although that’s not really his name. He’s the new teacher and assistant baseball coach at Central Valley High. Among his secrets: Six days from now, there’s going to be a bombing. But what does Chris want from the baseball players and families?  

Carl Hiaasen was born and raised in Florida. He is the author of thirteen previous novels, including the best sellers Bad Monkey, Star Island, Nature Girl, Skinny Dip, Sick Puppy, and Lucky You, and five best-selling children’s books, Hoot, Flush, Scat, Chomp, and Skink. His most recent work of nonfiction is Dance of the Reptiles, a collection of his columns from The Miami Herald.

In his most recent novel Razor Girl, now out in paperback, Merry Mansfield specializes in kidnapping for the mob. Her preferred method is rear-ending her targets and asking them for a ride. Her latest mark is Martin Trebeaux, owner of a private beach renourishment company who has delivered substandard sand to a mob hotel. But there's just one problem: Razor Girl hits the wrong guy. Instead, she ends up with Lane Coolman, talent manager for Buck Nance, the star of a reality TV show about a family of Cajun rooster farmers. Buck Nance, left to perform standup at a Key West bar without his handler, makes enough off-color jokes to incite a brawl, then flees for his life and vanishes. Now a routine promotional appearance has become a missing persons case.

In Josh Barkan’s Mexico: Stories  the characters - chef, architect, nurse, high school teacher, painter, beauty queen, classical bass player, plastic surgeon, businessman, mime - are simply trying to lead their lives and steer clear of violence. Yet, inevitably, crime has a way of intruding on their lives all the same.

A surgeon finds himself forced into performing a risky procedure on a narco killer. A teacher struggles to protect lovestruck students whose forbidden romance has put them in mortal peril. A painter’s freewheeling ways land him in the back of a kidnapper’s car. Again and again, the walls between “ordinary life” and cartel violence are shown to be paper thin, and when they collapse the consequences are life-changing.

In Anne Rice's new novel, Prince Lestat and the Realms of Atlantis, the vampire Lestat de Lioncourt, hero, leader, inspirer, irresistible force, irrepressible spirit, battling (and ultimately reconciling with) a strange otherworldly form that has somehow taken possession of Lestat's undead body and soul.

This ancient and mysterious power and unearthly spirit of vampire lore has all the force, history, and insidious reach of the unknowable Universe.

Alice Hoffman has written more than thirty works of fiction, including The Museum of Extraordinary Things, The Dovekeepers and Practical Magic. Her latest novel is Faithful. It tells the story of a young woman struggling to redefine herself and the power of love, family, and fate.

Aaron Thier is the author of the novel The Ghost Apple, a semifinalist for the 2015 Thurber Prize for American Humor. He writes a column, Food & Consequences, for Lucky Peach and he is a regular book critic for the Nation.

In his novel, Mr. Eternity it's Key West in 2016. Sea levels are rising, coral reefs are dying. In short, everything is going to hell. It’s here that two young filmmakers find something to believe in: an old sailor who calls himself Daniel Defoe and claims to be five hundred and sixty years old. In fact, old Dan is in the prime of his life—an incredible, perhaps eternal American life. The story unfolds over the course of a millennium,

James Lasdun At NYSWI

Nov 15, 2016

It is summer, 2012. Charlie, a wealthy banker with an uneasy conscience, invites his troubled cousin Matthew to visit him and his wife in their idyllic mountaintop house. As the days grow hotter, the friendship between the three begins to reveal its fault lines, and with the arrival of a fourth character, the household finds itself suddenly in the grip of uncontrollable passions. As readers of James Lasdun’s acclaimed fiction can expect, The Fall Guy is a complex moral tale as well as a gripping suspense story, probing questions of guilt and betrayal with ruthless incisiveness.

James Lasdun and Charles Baxter will participate in two events presented by The New York State Writers Institute today.

  Jennifer Chiaverini is the New York Times bestselling author of Mrs. Grant and Madame JuleMrs. Lincoln's DressmakerThe SpymistressMrs. Lincoln's Rival, and the Elm Creek Quilts series.

Her new novel, Fates and Traitors, is about John Wilkes Booth, the mercurial son of an acclaimed British stage actor and Covent Garden flower girl, committed one of the most notorious acts in American history—the assassination of President Abraham Lincoln.

  In June of 2012, Joseph Fink and Jeffrey Cranor, the creators of the Welcome to Night Vale podcast, began airing twice-monthly podcasts, hoping to be heard by anyone outside their close circles.

By the anniversary show a year later, the fan base had exploded, vaulting the podcast into the #1 spot on iTunes. Since then, its popularity has grown by epic proportions, hitting more than 100 million downloads, expanding to a successful live international touring stage show, a New York Times bestselling novel, and a podcast network: Night Vale Presents.

Now, for the first time, the first two seasons of Welcome to Night Vale are available as books. Joseph Fink and Jeffrey Cranor will talk about the books and the podcast in an event emceed by Meg Bashwiner at the Morton Memorial Library in Rhinecliff, NY presented by Oblong Books on Thursday, September 15th at 6 p.m.

  Lisa Scottoline is a New York Times bestselling and Edgar Award-winning author of twenty-seven novels. She has 30 million copies of her books in print in the United States, she has been published in thirty-five countries, and her thrillers have been optioned for television and film.

In her latest, Damaged, ten-year-old Patrick O'Brien is a natural target at school. Shy, dyslexic, and small for his age, he tries to hide his first-grade reading level from everyone: from his classmates, from the grandfather who cares for him, and from the teachers who are supposed to help him. But the real trouble begins when Patrick is accused of attacking a school aide. The aide promptly quits and sues the boy, his family, and the school district. Patrick's grandfather turns to the law firm of Rosato & DiNunzio for help and Mary DiNunzio is on the case. Soon Mary becomes Patrick's true champion and his only hope for security and justice.

  Joshua Cohen’s new novel, Book of Numbers, is narrated by a fictional Joshua Cohen – also a writer, whose misfortune is to have written a book with the publication date of September 11, 2001. 

  Colm Tóibín is one of Ireland’s foremost living novelists and journalists. His most recent novel is Nora Webster, which the Los Angeles Times said “may actually be a perfect work of fiction.”

He also wrote the novel, Brooklyn, which was made into a successful film nominated this year for an Oscar for Best Picture. 

  In the early seventeenth century, a crippled, graying, almost toothless veteran of Spain's wars against the Ottoman Empire published a book. It was the story of a poor nobleman, his brain addled from reading too many books of chivalry, who deludes himself that he is a knight errant and sets off on hilarious adventures. That book, Don Quixote, went on to sell more copies than any other book beside the Bible, making its author, Miguel de Cervantes, the single most-read author in human history. Cervantes did more than just publish a bestseller, though. He invented a way of writing.

In The Man Who Invented Fiction William Egginton explores Cervantes's life and the world he lived in, showing how his influences converged in his work, and how his work--especially Don Quixote--radically changed the nature of literature and created a new way of viewing the world.

 

Today's Book Picks list comes from Rachel Person of The Northshire Bookstore.

List:
They May Not Mean To, But They Do by Cathleen Schine
Be Frank With Me by Julia Claiborne Johnson
The Curious Charms of Arthur Pepper by Phaedra Patrick
Cook Korean! A Comic Book with Recipes by Robin Ha (to be released 7/5)
Just My Luck by  Cammie McGovern
The Great American Whatever by Tim Federle
The War that Saved My Life by Kimberly Brubraker Bradley

  The Nest is a story about the power of family, the possibilities of friendship, the ways we depend upon one another and the ways we let one another down.

In her tender, entertaining, and deftly written debut, Cynthia D'Aprix Sweeney brings a remarkable cast of characters to life to illuminate what money does to relationships, what happens to our ambitions over the course of time, and the fraught yet unbreakable ties we share with those we love.

  In our Ideas Matter segment we take time just about every week to check in with the state humanities councils in our 7-state region.

Today we're discussing the long and colorful history of American crime writing. Our guest is Harold Schecter, professor of English at Queens College, CUNY, and the editor of the Library of America's True Crime volume. A writer of true crime fiction himself, Harold recently served as the scholar-advisor for the New York Council's new Reading and Discussion series "True Crime an American Genre."

  Debbie Macomber has been dubbed "the reigning queen of women's fiction."

She has 200 million books in print; the newest, A Girl’s Guide to Moving On, is about a mother and her daughter-in-law who both leave their respective troubled marriages and lean on each other while starting over.

Georgia By Dawn Tripp

Mar 1, 2016

  In 1916, Georgia O’Keeffe is a young, unknown art teacher when she travels to New York to meet Stieglitz, the famed photographer and art dealer, who has discovered O’Keeffe’s work and exhibits it in his gallery. Their connection is instantaneous. O’Keeffe is quickly drawn into Stieglitz’s sophisticated world, becoming his mistress, protégé, and muse, as their attraction deepens into an intense and tempestuous relationship and his photographs of her, both clothed and nude, create a sensation. 

Winner of the Massachusetts Book Award for fiction, Dawn Tripp is the author of the novels Moon Tide, The Season of Open Water, and Game of Secrets, a Boston Globe bestseller.

  From Shirley Jackson, the peerless author of "The Lottery" and "We Have Always Lived in the Castle," comes a new volume of unpublished and uncollected stories, essays, lectures, letters and drawings.

Let Me Tell You brings together the deliciously eerie short stories Jackson is best known for with frank and inspiring lectures on writing; comic essays she wrote about her large, rowdy family; and revelatory personal letters and drawings.

The collection is edited by Jackson's children, Laurence Jackson Hyman and Sarah Hyman DeWitt. Laurence joins us for this interview.

Nonfiction
Between the World and Me by Ta-Nehisi Coates
The Wright Brothers by David McCullough
Dead Wake by Erik Larson
Black Flags: The Rise Of ISIS by Joby Warrick
So You've Been Publicly Shamed by Jon Ronson

Fiction
Fates and Furies by Lauren Groff
A Spool of Blue Thread by Anne Tyler
The Book of Aron by Jim Shepard
A Little Life by Hanya Yanagihara
The First Bad Man by Miranda July

What were some of your favorite books this year? Share in the comments! 

 Amy Stewart is the author of six books including the best sellers, The Drunken Botanists and Wicked Plants, all were non-fiction; she now has written a novel. Girl Waits with Gun is the story of Constance Kopp a woman who doesn't quite fit the mold, she towers over most men, has no interest in marriage or domestic affairs, and has kept mostly to her remote farm ever since a remote farm sent her household out of the country fifteen years ago. It is a true story she is writing about, but it is a fictional tale.   

Five teens victimized by sex trafficking try to find their way to a new life in the new book Traffick, a companion to the New York Times Best Selling Tricks, by Ellen Hopkins author of Crank.   

Make Me by Lee Child

Oct 16, 2015

 The New York Times has called Lee Child “the best thrill writer of the moment” and the Los Angeles Times named him “the poster boy for American crime fiction.” With more than 100 million copies of his novels in print worldwide featuring his now iconic creation—ex Army cop and all-around tough guy Jack Reacher—Lee Child is hotter than ever! 

Child returns his new novel, Make Me , where Reacher encounters a case that proves to be one of the most challenging—and haunting—of his career. Most recently, Reacher was portrayed by Tom Cruise in the first film Jack Reacher. A second film will be out next year. It is a pleasure to welcome Lee Child to the Roundtable this morning. Lee, thanks for being here.

  Richard Price is known for his bestsellers Clockers and Freedomland as well as writing for the HBO hit – The Wire.

His latest book, The Whites, is a tale of a New York City police detective under siege by an unsolved murder, his own dark past, and a violent stalker out of revenge.

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