fiction

  The Nest is a story about the power of family, the possibilities of friendship, the ways we depend upon one another and the ways we let one another down.

In her tender, entertaining, and deftly written debut, Cynthia D'Aprix Sweeney brings a remarkable cast of characters to life to illuminate what money does to relationships, what happens to our ambitions over the course of time, and the fraught yet unbreakable ties we share with those we love.

  In our Ideas Matter segment we take time just about every week to check in with the state humanities councils in our 7-state region.

Today we're discussing the long and colorful history of American crime writing. Our guest is Harold Schecter, professor of English at Queens College, CUNY, and the editor of the Library of America's True Crime volume. A writer of true crime fiction himself, Harold recently served as the scholar-advisor for the New York Council's new Reading and Discussion series "True Crime an American Genre."

  In the early seventeenth century, a crippled, graying, almost toothless veteran of Spain's wars against the Ottoman Empire published a book. It was the story of a poor nobleman, his brain addled from reading too many books of chivalry, who deludes himself that he is a knight errant and sets off on hilarious adventures. That book, Don Quixote, went on to sell more copies than any other book beside the Bible, making its author, Miguel de Cervantes, the single most-read author in human history. Cervantes did more than just publish a bestseller, though. He invented a way of writing.

In The Man Who Invented Fiction William Egginton explores Cervantes's life and the world he lived in, showing how his influences converged in his work, and how his work--especially Don Quixote--radically changed the nature of literature and created a new way of viewing the world.

  Debbie Macomber has been dubbed "the reigning queen of women's fiction."

She has 200 million books in print; the newest, A Girl’s Guide to Moving On, is about a mother and her daughter-in-law who both leave their respective troubled marriages and lean on each other while starting over.

Georgia By Dawn Tripp

Mar 1, 2016

  In 1916, Georgia O’Keeffe is a young, unknown art teacher when she travels to New York to meet Stieglitz, the famed photographer and art dealer, who has discovered O’Keeffe’s work and exhibits it in his gallery. Their connection is instantaneous. O’Keeffe is quickly drawn into Stieglitz’s sophisticated world, becoming his mistress, protégé, and muse, as their attraction deepens into an intense and tempestuous relationship and his photographs of her, both clothed and nude, create a sensation. 

Winner of the Massachusetts Book Award for fiction, Dawn Tripp is the author of the novels Moon Tide, The Season of Open Water, and Game of Secrets, a Boston Globe bestseller.

  From Shirley Jackson, the peerless author of "The Lottery" and "We Have Always Lived in the Castle," comes a new volume of unpublished and uncollected stories, essays, lectures, letters and drawings.

Let Me Tell You brings together the deliciously eerie short stories Jackson is best known for with frank and inspiring lectures on writing; comic essays she wrote about her large, rowdy family; and revelatory personal letters and drawings.

The collection is edited by Jackson's children, Laurence Jackson Hyman and Sarah Hyman DeWitt. Laurence joins us for this interview.

Nonfiction
Between the World and Me by Ta-Nehisi Coates
The Wright Brothers by David McCullough
Dead Wake by Erik Larson
Black Flags: The Rise Of ISIS by Joby Warrick
So You've Been Publicly Shamed by Jon Ronson

Fiction
Fates and Furies by Lauren Groff
A Spool of Blue Thread by Anne Tyler
The Book of Aron by Jim Shepard
A Little Life by Hanya Yanagihara
The First Bad Man by Miranda July

What were some of your favorite books this year? Share in the comments! 

 Amy Stewart is the author of six books including the best sellers, The Drunken Botanists and Wicked Plants, all were non-fiction; she now has written a novel. Girl Waits with Gun is the story of Constance Kopp a woman who doesn't quite fit the mold, she towers over most men, has no interest in marriage or domestic affairs, and has kept mostly to her remote farm ever since a remote farm sent her household out of the country fifteen years ago. It is a true story she is writing about, but it is a fictional tale.   

Five teens victimized by sex trafficking try to find their way to a new life in the new book Traffick, a companion to the New York Times Best Selling Tricks, by Ellen Hopkins author of Crank.   

Make Me by Lee Child

Oct 16, 2015

 The New York Times has called Lee Child “the best thrill writer of the moment” and the Los Angeles Times named him “the poster boy for American crime fiction.” With more than 100 million copies of his novels in print worldwide featuring his now iconic creation—ex Army cop and all-around tough guy Jack Reacher—Lee Child is hotter than ever! 

Child returns his new novel, Make Me , where Reacher encounters a case that proves to be one of the most challenging—and haunting—of his career. Most recently, Reacher was portrayed by Tom Cruise in the first film Jack Reacher. A second film will be out next year. It is a pleasure to welcome Lee Child to the Roundtable this morning. Lee, thanks for being here.

  Richard Price is known for his bestsellers Clockers and Freedomland as well as writing for the HBO hit – The Wire.

His latest book, The Whites, is a tale of a New York City police detective under siege by an unsolved murder, his own dark past, and a violent stalker out of revenge.

  Joshua Cohen’s new novel, Book of Numbers, is narrated by a fictional Joshua Cohen – also a writer, whose misfortune is to have written a book with the publication date of September 11, 2001. 

  The New York Times Book Review has called author Mary-Beth Hughes “a writer of dexterity and imagination.” In her new novel The Loved Ones, Hughes explores deep into the secret places between men and women to give an incisive portrayal of one family's struggle to stay together against stacked odds of deception, adultery, and loss.

Hughes is the author of the bestselling novel Wavemaker II, a New York Times Notable Book, and the acclaimed collection Double Happiness, which earned a Pushcart Prize.

The Northshire Bookstore in Manchester Center, VT will be hosting a reception for the new book from 6 -7 PM. with a reading and audience discussion to follow.

  T. C. Boyle has been called by the New York Times - "one of the most inventive and verbally exuberant writers of his generation." Boyle is the bestselling author of fourteen novels and nine short story collections.

His newest book, The Harder They Come, explores anti-authoritarianism and the bloodshed that can accompany it.

Allison Pataki is the best-selling author of the book The Traitor’s Wife and she is now back with another historic novel about a leading lady largely lost in the annals of history.

The Accidental Empress is a fictional portrayal of the little known and tumultuous love story of “Sisi,” the Austro-Hungarian Empress and captivating wife of Emperor Franz Joseph, who was plucked from obscurity at the age of sixteen and thrust onto the throne in the golden era of the Habsburg Court.

  Peter Carey is a two-time winner of the Man Booker Prize - and he's one of only three authors to have won Prize twice. Carey’s newest novel is Amnesia, a cyber-terrorism political thriller that explores Australia’s history and politics, and its quasi-colonial relationship with the United States, during three different periods of recent history: the 1940s, the 1970s, and the present-day era of cybersecurity, hackers, and WikiLeaks.

    Chilean writer, Isabel Allende, has written her first murder-mystery.

Ripper takes place in San Francisco and centers on Amanda, a teen sleuth hooked on crime novels and online games. When a rash of killings strikes the city and her mother disappears, she takes it upon herself to investigate.

  Archer Mayor, author of the New York Times bestselling, Vermont-based mystery series featuring detective Joe Gunther, is appearing around our region this month reading from and autographing his new novel, Proof Positive.

      Jayne Anne Phillips grew up in West Virginia hearing about the infamous Quiet Dell murders of 1931, real-life killings of a widow and her three children at the hands of a con man she met through a lonely hearts club.

Phillips learned about the grisly case from her mother, who remembered as a child walking past the “murder garage” where Asta Eicher and her children — 14, 12 and 9 – died, the road nearby lined with cars of souvenir-seekers.

    

  Justin Kramon is a Philadelphia-based writer whose first novel was Finny and who’s latest is The Preservationist. The popular novel is about a thrilling love triangle that takes place between three college students.

The Preservationist stars Julia, a damaged young woman who finds herself in the sights of two men, one a fellow college student, the other older and an employee of a restaurant she frequents. So, the big question – which one is the psycho.

Kramon has also taught at several universities, including Haverford and Arcadia.

    In her bestseller Room, writer Emma Donoghue imagined what life would be like for a little boy born into captivity, to a mother who'd been kidnapped and sexually assaulted.

And in her new novel, Frog Music, she's imagined a possible solution to a very real murder, one that took place in California in 1876. That crime was never solved. But Emma Donoghue has gone through historical records to write what might have happened.

    

  George Saunders’ Tenth of December was named one of the best books of last year by The New York Times Magazine, NPR, Entertainment Weekly, New York, Kirkus Reviews, BookPage, Shelf Awareness, and People. It was a National Book Award finalist and won the Folio prize.

The collection of short stories scriven in Saunder’s signature sportive and startling style is now available in paperback.

    In The Invention of Wings, Hetty “Handful” Grimke, an urban slave in early nineteenth century Charleston, yearns for life beyond the suffocating walls that enclose her within the wealthy Grimke household. The Grimke’s daughter, Sarah, has known from an early age she is meant to do something large in the world, but she is hemmed in by the limits imposed on women.

Kidd’s sweeping novel is set in motion on Sarah’s eleventh birthday, when she is given ownership of ten year old Handful, who is to be her handmaid.

Proclaimed by the Chicago Tribune as a joy for readers-Susan Nussbaum’s made her debut as the 2012 winner of Barbra King Solver’s Pen Bellwether prize, for socially engaged fiction.

Inspired by Nussbaum’s personal experiences and told in alternating perspectives by a varied and vocal cast of characters, Good Kings, Bad Kings, pulls back the curtain to reveal the complicated life inside the walls of an institution for young adults with disabilities.

    

    Thriller writer Lisa Gardner is back with her 21st novel and the eighth crime book featuring Detective DD Warren.

Her latest, Fear Nothing, focuses on two sisters – one a successful therapist, Doctor Adeline Glen, who suffers from congenital analgesia (she can’t feel pain), the other, Shana Day, a serial killer serving time in prison for multiple murders.

As daughters of mass murderer Harry Day, they now have to join forces to help DD catch a predator copying their late father’s modus operandi.

  Our interview with Meg Wolitzer originally aired on The Book Show. The episode is online here.

Sara Paretsky 

Oct 23, 2013

In Critical Mass, private investigator V.I. Warshawski is asked by her closest friend Lotty for urgent help. Lotty lost most of her family in the Holocaust, and escaped to London in 1939 on the Kindertransport with a childhood playmate.

When Kitty’s daughter finds her life to be suddenly in danger, she calls Lotty, who, in turn, summons V.I. to aid them.

Sara Paretsky is the author of nineteen books, the most recent of which was Critical Mass. Paretsky was named 2011 Grand Master by the Mystery Writers of America and she joins us this morning.

  

  

Let it Burn is the newest novel in the acclaimed Alex McKnight series by two-time Edgar award-winner and New York Times bestselling author Steve Hamilton.

Even though Alex McKnight swore to serve and protect Detroit as a police officer, a trip to Motown these days is a trip to a past he’d just as soon forget. The city will forever remind him of his partner’s death and of the bullet still lodged in his own chest. So he’s more than happy to stay in the little town of Paradise, three hundred miles and half a lifetime away.

When the sergeant invites Alex downstate to have a drink for old times’ sake, it’s an offer he would normally refuse. However, there’s a certain female FBI agent he can’t stop thinking about, so he gets in his truck and he goes back to Detroit. While there, he’s reminded of something about that last case, a seemingly small piece of the puzzle that he never got to share. It’s not something anyone wants to hear, but Alex can’t let go of this gut feeling that they arrested the wrong man.

  Making her young adult fiction debut, Hollis Seamon creates one of the most original voices to appear in young adult literature with Somebody Up There Hates You.

In the book, Richard Casey narrates a story that is unflinching, graphic, heartbreaking, funny, and above all life-affirming in its depiction of what it really means to be a teenager dying of cancer.

Hollis Seamon will participate in Troy Author Day at The Troy Public Library this Saturday.

    Elizabeth Gilbert - author of the #1 New York Times bestseller, Eat, Pray, Love, returns to fiction with her first novel in 13-years.

The Signature of All Things is an epic story of desire, ambition and the thirst for knowledge spanning the 18th and 19th centuries – telling the birth to death story of botanist Alma Whittaker.

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