fiction

  Joshua Cohen’s new novel, Book of Numbers, is narrated by a fictional Joshua Cohen – also a writer, whose misfortune is to have written a book with the publication date of September 11, 2001. 

  The New York Times Book Review has called author Mary-Beth Hughes “a writer of dexterity and imagination.” In her new novel The Loved Ones, Hughes explores deep into the secret places between men and women to give an incisive portrayal of one family's struggle to stay together against stacked odds of deception, adultery, and loss.

Hughes is the author of the bestselling novel Wavemaker II, a New York Times Notable Book, and the acclaimed collection Double Happiness, which earned a Pushcart Prize.

The Northshire Bookstore in Manchester Center, VT will be hosting a reception for the new book from 6 -7 PM. with a reading and audience discussion to follow.

  T. C. Boyle has been called by the New York Times - "one of the most inventive and verbally exuberant writers of his generation." Boyle is the bestselling author of fourteen novels and nine short story collections.

His newest book, The Harder They Come, explores anti-authoritarianism and the bloodshed that can accompany it.

Allison Pataki is the best-selling author of the book The Traitor’s Wife and she is now back with another historic novel about a leading lady largely lost in the annals of history.

The Accidental Empress is a fictional portrayal of the little known and tumultuous love story of “Sisi,” the Austro-Hungarian Empress and captivating wife of Emperor Franz Joseph, who was plucked from obscurity at the age of sixteen and thrust onto the throne in the golden era of the Habsburg Court.

  Peter Carey is a two-time winner of the Man Booker Prize - and he's one of only three authors to have won Prize twice. Carey’s newest novel is Amnesia, a cyber-terrorism political thriller that explores Australia’s history and politics, and its quasi-colonial relationship with the United States, during three different periods of recent history: the 1940s, the 1970s, and the present-day era of cybersecurity, hackers, and WikiLeaks.

    Chilean writer, Isabel Allende, has written her first murder-mystery.

Ripper takes place in San Francisco and centers on Amanda, a teen sleuth hooked on crime novels and online games. When a rash of killings strikes the city and her mother disappears, she takes it upon herself to investigate.

  Archer Mayor, author of the New York Times bestselling, Vermont-based mystery series featuring detective Joe Gunther, is appearing around our region this month reading from and autographing his new novel, Proof Positive.

      Jayne Anne Phillips grew up in West Virginia hearing about the infamous Quiet Dell murders of 1931, real-life killings of a widow and her three children at the hands of a con man she met through a lonely hearts club.

Phillips learned about the grisly case from her mother, who remembered as a child walking past the “murder garage” where Asta Eicher and her children — 14, 12 and 9 – died, the road nearby lined with cars of souvenir-seekers.

    

  Justin Kramon is a Philadelphia-based writer whose first novel was Finny and who’s latest is The Preservationist. The popular novel is about a thrilling love triangle that takes place between three college students.

The Preservationist stars Julia, a damaged young woman who finds herself in the sights of two men, one a fellow college student, the other older and an employee of a restaurant she frequents. So, the big question – which one is the psycho.

Kramon has also taught at several universities, including Haverford and Arcadia.

    In her bestseller Room, writer Emma Donoghue imagined what life would be like for a little boy born into captivity, to a mother who'd been kidnapped and sexually assaulted.

And in her new novel, Frog Music, she's imagined a possible solution to a very real murder, one that took place in California in 1876. That crime was never solved. But Emma Donoghue has gone through historical records to write what might have happened.

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