Tomorrow at 11 a.m., Images Cinema in Williamstown, MA will present a screening of the 1982 Rankin and Bass animated film - The Last Unicorn.

It tells the story of The Unicorn, believing she is the last of her kind, leaving the forest where she lives in an attempt to find others. Along the way she is kidnapped by Mommy Fortuna, freed by the bumbling magician, Schmendrick - and then re-imprisoned by him when he turns her into a human in an effort to save her. Adored by everyone she meets including the brave and sad Molly Grue, the miserable King Haggard and his adopted son, the valiant Prince Lir - she must fight The Red Bull and return home.

The screenplay is by Peter S. Beagle based on his 1968 novel of the same name. Peter has been touring with the film for a few years, meeting fans and being celebrated for his most celebrated work. The Last Unicorn has also been adapted into a beautiful graphic novel.

The film boasts the voice talents of Alan Arkin, Jeff Bridges, Mia Farrow, Angela Lansbury, Christopher Lee and music by Jimmy Webb, performed by America. The Last Unicorn is one of those pedestal films for fantasy fans and 80s kids.

Peter Beagle will introduce the film tomorrow in Williamstown and participate in a Q&A and signing afterward.


   The Berkshire International Film Festival is presenting a special cast reunion and screening of the classic 1978 comedy, National Lampoon's Animal House, on Saturday night.

Members of Faber College's infamous Class of 1963 including Karen Allen, Peter Riegert, Mark Metcalf, Martha Smith, Jaime Widdows, and Judy Belushi will be in attendance following the film for a Q&A and a performance by Otis Day to complete the evening at The Mahaiwe Performing Arts Center in Great Barrington, MA.

Also in attendance will be the man who was at the helm of the film, director John Landis. Landis became famous for his work on Animal House - going on to direct such films as The Blues Brothers, An American Werewolf in London, Trading Places, Coming to America, and The Three Amigos.


  Jim Dale started his professional career as a seventeen year old comedian playing the Music Halls of Britain. A little down the road he became a pop singing star during the early days of rock and roll and appeared in fourteen of the legendary Carry On films for the British cinema.

At the request of Laurence Olivier he joined the British National Theatre. He starred in the first Musical by Cameron Mackintosh, The Card, and played Fagin in Oliver! at the London Palladium. He first appeared on the American stage in 1973 - in 1980 he won the Tony Award for his work in Barnum.

Jaime Alvarez

  Hamilton Fish II was a descendant of one of the most prominent families in New York State. Hamilton “Albert” Fish was a psychopath and a most notorious child murderer. They died one day apart in 1936. A newspaper editor becomes obsessed with the coincidence of their shared names after publishing their obituaries on his front page.

The Lives of Hamilton Fish is a cinematic rock opera inspired by that true story. Rachel Mason wrote, directed and stars in the film, much of it was shot on location at historic sites in the Hudson Valley.

    “I’m mad as hell, and I'm not going to take this anymore!”

Those words, spoken by an unhinged anchorman named Howard Beale, “the mad prophet of the airwaves,” took America by storm in 1976, whenNetwork became a sensation. With a superb cast (including Faye Dunaway, William Holden, Peter Finch, and Robert Duvall) directed by Sidney Lumet, the film won four Academy Awards and indelibly shaped how we think about corporate and media power.

In Mad As Hell, Dave Itzkoff of The New York Times recounts the surprising and dramatic story of how Network made it to the screen.

  Does acting matter?

David Thomson, one of our most respected and insightful writers on movies and theater, answers this question in his essay, Why Acting Matters.

Thomson tackles this most elusive of subjects, examining the allure of the performing arts for both the artist and the audience member while addressing the paradoxes inherent in acting itself. He reflects on the casting process, on stage versus film acting, and on the cult of celebrity.

  In Pictures at a Revolution, Mark Harris turned the story of the five movies nominated for Best Picture in 1967 into a landmark work of cultural history, a book about the transformation of an art form and the larger social shift it signified.

In his new book, Five Came Back: A Story of Hollywood and The Second World War, he achieves something larger and even more remarkable, giving us the untold story of how Hollywood changed World War II, and how World War II changed Hollywood, through the prism of five film directors caught up in the war: John Ford, William Wyler, John Huston, Frank Capra, and George Stevens.

Metroland 2/12/15

Feb 12, 2015

  Shawn Stone, the Arts Editor of Metroland, lets us know what is coming to area stages and screens this week.

Daniel Boud

    Miranda July is a filmmaker, artist, and writer. Her collection of stories, No One Belongs Here More Than You, won the Frank O'Connor International Short Story Award. She wrote, directed, and starred in the feature films The Future and Me and You and Everyone We Know.

Her debut novel is The First Bad Man: A Novel.

Metroland 1/29/15

Jan 29, 2015

  Shawn Stone, the Arts Editor of Metroland, lets us know what is coming to area stages and screens this week.