food waste


New York state gave $3.5 million last year to support municipal recycling projects across the state and the donation of wholesome food as officials strive to cut down on greenhouse gas emissions.

In an era of growing poverty, homelessness and hunger, it’s amazing how little attention the problem of food waste gets by policymakers.  According to a 2016 report (in the Guardian), roughly 50 percent of all produce in the United States is thrown away—some 60 million tons (or $160 billion) worth of produce annually, an amount constituting “one third of all foodstuffs.”

Grant Aims To Stem Food Waste In The Hudson Valley

Jun 12, 2017
farm produce
US Department of Agriculture

A group that counts seven Hudson Valley counties as its members has received New York state funding to continue its work in food rescue and combating food insecurity. WAMC’s Hudson Valley Bureau Chief Allison Dunne has more.

Local Groups Prep For Feeding The Hudson Valley

Oct 4, 2016

A number of community organizations in the Hudson Valley are banding together to raise awareness about food waste. They’ve been prepping for a first-time event Saturday at Walkway Over the Hudson called Feeding the Hudson Valley.

Efforts to recycle tons of food waste in Connecticut are taking shape. State officials have granted the first permit for a new anaerobic digestion facility in Bridgeport. It comes four years after state legislators required certain commercial operations to recycle the material.

Three other proposed anaerobic digestion centers are currently in different stages of state permitting. There are currently three commercial composting facilities.

food waste

With America Recycles Day Saturday, Massachusetts environmental officials are celebrating the Commonwealth’s new commercial food waste ban – the first statewide ban in the nation. The state’s Commissioner of Environmental Protection will visit the Red Lion Inn to see how the renowned hotel is shipping its food waste to a nearby farm.

Wikimedia Commons/Public Domain

This week, officials from the Massachusetts Executive Office of Energy and Environmental Affairs proposed a ban on commercial food waste beginning in July 2014 that would aim to divert food and organic waste from landfills and support disposal through anaerobic digestion, a process that can transform the discarded material to energy.