food

Martha Holmberg was trained at La Varenne and is an award-winning food writer. Her look at this sometimes-intimidating genre—expressed in clear, short bites of information and through dozens of process photographs—delivers the skill of great sauce-making to every kind of cook, from beginners to those more accomplished who wish to expand their repertoire.

For Julia Pandl, the rite of passage into young-adulthood included mandatory service at her family’s restaurant, where she watched as her father—who was also the chef—ruled with the strictness of a drill sergeant.

At age twelve, Julie was initiated into the rite of the Sunday brunch, a weekly madhouse at her father’s Milwaukee-based restaurant, where she and her eight older siblings before her did service in a situation of controlled chaos, learning the ropes of the family business and, more important, learning life lessons that would shape them for all the years to come.

In October 2008, bestselling author Dr. Andrew Weil, with restaurateur Sam Fox, opened the first True Food Kitchen restaurant in Phoenix, Arizona, with the goal of creating a menu of freshly imagined meals centered on the principles of his Anti-Inflammatory Diet and Food Pyramid.

The restaurant has garnered the reputation of being one of the country’s healthiest, and it has become known for its use of organic and locally grown products as well as seasonal menu changes.

Thanksgiving: How to Cook it Well

Nov 21, 2012

From one of America’s finest food writers, the former restaurant critic for The New York Times, comes a definitive, timeless guide to Thanksgiving dinner—preparing it, surviving it, and pulling it off in style. We welcome Sam Sifton and speak with him about his book, Thanksgiving: How to Cook It Well.

The Great American Cookbook

Nov 21, 2012

Kelly Alexander is a longtime editor at Saveur magazine, has written for The New Republic, Food & Wine, and The New York Times. She joins us to talk about The Great American Cookbook: 500 Time-Tested Recipes: Favorite Food from Every State.

In 2008, farmers grew enough to feed twice the world's population, yet more people starved than ever before—and most of them were farmers.

Vermont U.S. Senator Bernie Sanders says cuts in a federal emergency hunger program have resulted in a 50 percent reduction in food supplies from that program for the Vermont Foodbank.

Sanders, who calls the situation "unconscionable," appeared Tuesday with representatives from the Vermont Foodbank and Chittenden Emergency Food Shelf to highlight the issue.

The Emergency Food Assistance Program provides food at no cost to low-income Americans in need of short-term hunger relief, through organizations like the Vermont Foodbank.

In 1784, Thomas Jefferson struck a deal with one of his slaves, 19-year-old James Hemings. The founding Father was traveling to Paris and wanted to bring James along “for a particular purpose” – to master the art of French cooking.

In exchange for James’s cooperation, Jefferson would grant his freedom. Thus began one of the strangest partnerships in U.S. history. As James apprenticed under master French chefs, Jefferson studied the cultivation of French crops (especially grapes for winemaking) so they might be replicated in American agriculture.

The USDA is helping fund an effort to get products from local farms into the kitchens of large institutions in the region, such as colleges and hospitals.  Officials say the demand for food from closer to home continues to grow, but the infrastructure to supply it has not kept up.  WAMC”s Pioneer Valley Bureau Chief Paul Tuthill reports

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