fracking

The debate over hydraulic fracturing in New York will take on a religious and spiritual flavor tomorrow. An event called the Blessing of the Waters will take place at noon tomorrow at the Fenimore Art Museum in Cooperstown at the shores of Otsego Lake. The organizer of the event is Reverend Craig Schwalenberg, the Minister of the Unitarian Universalist Society of Oneonta.

A company that wants to build a natural gas pipeline through parts of four New York counties could be facing growing public opposition. Constitution Pipeline wants to run the line from Susquehanna County Pennsylvania through parts of Deleware, Schoharie, Chenango and Broome counties, but more landowners in those counties will not grant permission for the company to conduct land surveys for the project. Joe Mahoney is a reporter with the Oneonta Daily Star newspaper, and has been following the story. He spoke with WAMC’s Brian Shields.

In a recently published interview, New York State Department of Environmental Conservation chairman Joe Martens says that the state’s review of the potential environmental impacts of hydraulic fracturing for natural gas – known as ‘fracking’ – remains a work in progress, despite the department having already produced about 4,000 pages on the subject.

Governor Cuomo has proposed that individual communities should be able to decide for themselves whether or not to allow Fracking – what do you think?

Karen DeWitt

The state’s major environmental groups have formed a new coalition, urging Governor Andrew Cuomo to reject a plan to begin hydrofracking in select counties in New York’s Southern Tier.  Capitol Correspondent Karen DeWitt reports… 

Peter Hudiburg of the town of Plymouth, in Chenango County joined major environmental groups like the Sierra Club and Hudson Riverkeeper in a rally to persuade Governor Andrew Cuomo to drop a plan to begin limited hydrofracking in the state’s Southern Tier.

“Governor Cuomo, the science is in,” he shouted. “This is a very dangerous technology.”

As the debate over the future of hydraulic fracturing rages on, a group of upstate New York landowners has filed a lawsuit seeking to overturn "Local Law Number Six," a temporary ban on natural-gas drilling in the city of Binghamton. Hudson Valley Bureau Chief Dave Lucas reports.

Five property owners filed suit last week in state Supreme Court in Broome County, charging that  Binghamton's Mayor and city council violated state law when the municipality passed a two-year ban on drilling back in December,  without first seeking approval from the county's planning department.

Some New York farmers look across the Susquehanna River, see the flares of Pennsylvania gas wells and think of the money they're losing as heated debate keeps hydraulic fracturing, or fracking, out of New York.

Others worry that the natural gas drilling process that blasts wells with chemical-laced water could ruin rich farmlands and dramatically harm growers.

New York state has blocked Marcellus Shale gas development for four years while it completes an environmental review. Meanwhile, thousands of wells have gone into production in Pennsylvania.

Vermont’s governor has signed into law the nation’s first ban on the natural gas drilling technique called hydraulic fracturing.  WAMC’s North Country Bureau Chief Pat Bradley reports…

There's no drilling currently happening in Vermont, which is believed to have little to no reserves of oil or natural gas.

Lawmakers passed a preemptive ban on the practice and Democratic Governor Peter Shumlin signed the law Wednesday in a ceremony at the Statehouse in Montpelier…

Dave Lucas / WAMC

The issue of Hydraulic Fracturing, the gas drilling technique that extracts oil and gas from shale by blasting it with water, sand and chemicals - dominated the downtown Albany scene Tuesday:  The anti-fracking movement made a stand and a statement at the State Capitol with a full schedule of demonstrations, rallies and protests staged by various activists and green groups-

 

Hudson Valley Bureau Chief Dave Lucas was there and files this report

 

As we pay close attention to the debate over hydrofracking this morning – and all week — on WAMC, we now turn to an interview between our Alan Chartock and Dennis Holbrook, executive vice president and chief legal officer of Norse Energy Corporation. Holbrook has spent nearly four decades in the energy industry and has served as a director of the Independent Oil and Gas Association for the past 25 years. Holbrook describes the chemical mix used in the fracking process.

As New York State moves closer to making a decision whether or not to allow the controversial process of hydraulic fracturing, Hudson Valley Bureau Chief Dave Lucas reports there are new concerns about the gas extraction process and its impact on clean water

A coalition of upstate New York landowners seeking to lease land for natural gas drilling is pressing state officials to consider the rights of property owners as they make decisions on shale gas development. WAMC’s Dave Lucas has details…

The Joint Landowners Coalition of New York is at the Capitol Wednesday to present a "Declaration of Rights."

Author and journalist Tom Wilber join us to discuss his new book, Under the Surface: Fracking, Fortunes, and the Fate of the Marcellus Shale. He'll be at Oblong Books and Music in Rhinebeck on May 4th.

Aired 5/2/2012

Photo by Dave Lucas

Hundreds of college students from across New York marched to the Capitol Monday calling on the Governor to ban hydraulic fracturing… Hudson Valley Bureau Chief Dave Lucas was there and files this report.

Gas-Drilling Protesters to March on NY Capitol

Apr 30, 2012

Young people from around New York state are heading to the Capitol to call on Governor Andrew Cuomo to ban "fracking" for natural gas and lead the state toward a clean energy economy.

The Green Umbrella, a network of college students fighting climate change, held a conference in Albany over the weekend. On Monday, they'll be demonstrating against hydraulic fracturing, or fracking, which frees natural gas from shale. Critics say it threatens drinking water supplies and causes other environmental damage.

 This past week, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency issued final regulations to require oil and gas drillers to capture harmful air pollutants that escape from wells during drilling operations, and from natural gas storage facilities and pipelines.  The final rule is a first, and it's good news. But the new rules take 2 and a half years to become effective. New York can and should do better.

Department of Environmental Conservation Commissioner Joe Martens says there's no timeline for a decision on whether fracking of shale gas wells will be allowed in New York state, but the review will likely continue through the summer. More from WAMC's Dave Lucas...

Speaking Thursday at the annual Spring Environment Conference held by the Business Council in Albany, Martens says the agency doesn't have a specific date yet for an update on the environmental review and proposed regulations for high-volume hydraulic fracturing of shale gas wells.

A growing body of science is raising concerns about hydrofracking's public-health impacts from air pollution, just as the Federal EPA is completing rules to protect air quality from onshore oil-and-gas development — including fracking operations. Hudson Valley Bureau Chief Dave Lucas reports.

The Ulster County Executive sends a message to the gas industry. Hudson Valley Bureau Chief Dave Lucas reports Mike Hein has taken a stand against hydrofracking "brine" ---

Brine is a concoction of substances sprayed on roadways in winter as a de-icer, in summer as a way of keeping down dust. The practice began several years ago - in Pennsylvania. Ulster County Executive Mike Hein wants to be sure NO brine is spread on local roadways.

Stephen Gottlieb: Environmental liability

Apr 10, 2012

Let me suggest a solution to the fracking problem. The self-styled energy companies want to draw natural gas out of the shale deposits deep below the earth’s surface. Environmentalists like myself believe that fracking will foul the drinking water, damaging a much more crucial resource than the gas they’ll extract.  We also think that if gas is so valuable, they wouldn’t be burning it off where it already comes up alongside oil wells. But that’s another story. Let’s stick to safety.

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