freedom

Sarah S. Kilborne
Jane O’Connor

  The Lavender Blues is a showcase of queer music before World War II. It is music history. It is queer history. It is women's history. It is great entertainment.

With The Lavender Blues, modern cabaret performer Sarah Kilborne brings to light for the first time the quiet, yet powerful emergence between the world wars of songs that spoke about what it was like to be gay or "in the life."

From such legends as Ma Rainey, Bessie Smith, Gladys Bentley and Josephine Baker, Kilborne performs songs - written almost a century ago - that describe what it is like to be non-binary. The themes in the music are as emblematic of yesterday as they are relevant today, addressing issues of masculinity, femininity, same-sex love, cross-dressing, the desire for freedom from prejudice and more.

Sarah Kilborne is bringing the show to The Linda in Albany, NY on Friday night.

Stephen Gottlieb: Preserving Republican Government

Feb 2, 2016

Americans began to think about preserving and protecting their form of government even before the Constitution was signed.

James Green is a celebrated labor historian and author of the book Death in the Haymarket. His new book is The Devil is Here in These Hills, a chronicle of West Virginia’s coal miners and their fight for unionization and civil rights. The book is particularly relevant today as the arduous battle for the rights of West Virginia miners rages on. 

Herbert London: Freedom As A Natural Condition?

Oct 16, 2013

It has been argued in several of the intellectual journals in the West, that the aspiration for freedom is a universal goal, that most societies admire the freedoms we enjoy and wish to emulate us. As I see it, this proposition is one of the more pernicious illusions we entertain.

    Barry Siegel joins us to talk about his new book: Manifest Injustice: The True Story of a Convicted Murderer and the Lawyers Who Fought for His Freedom.

In the book, Siegel chronicles the dramatic story of an Arizona man named Bill Macumber who, until his unexpected release from prison last November, had spent more than half his life behind bars.

Today we’re talking freedom – which, according to the dictionary, can mean exemption from external control, the power to determine action without restraint, or national independence.

That leads us to Independence Day, celebrated tomorrow on the Fourth of July, a day when we, as Americans, are supposed to celebrate our freedom as afforded by our fore fathers with the signing of the Declaration of Independence in 1776.