future

  But What If We’re Wrong? visualizes the contemporary world as it will appear to those who'll perceive it as the distant past.

Chuck Klosterman asks questions that are profound in their simplicity: How certain are we about our understanding of gravity? How certain are we about our understanding of time? What will be the defining memory of rock music, five hundred years from today? How seriously should we view the content of our dreams? How seriously should we view the content of television? Are all sports destined for extinction? Is it possible that the greatest artist of our era is currently unknown (or—weirder still—widely known, but entirely disrespected)? Is it possible that we “overrate” democracy? And perhaps most disturbing, is it possible that we’ve reached the end of knowledge?

  Technology is becoming ever more capable of doing jobs that we once thought were only capable of being done by humans like driving cars,  unpacking boxes, driving cars, detecting emotions, even analyzing legal documents. For centuries technological innovation mostly complemented human labor by creating new and better jobs, facilitating higher productivity, and improving standards of living, but now many fear the technological advancement has reached a point where it will no longer complement many forms of labor but replace them all together. 

In His new book, Humans Are Underrated: What High Achievers Know That Brilliant Machines Never Will, fortune senior editor at large, Geoff Colvin, argues that despite our growing anxiety of a world that technology puts a majority of people out of work that this bleak future is not inevitable. 

  Margaret Atwood is the author of more than 50  books of fiction, poetry, and critical essays including Cat's Eye, Alias Grace, and A Handmaid’s Tale. Her latest, The Heart Goes Last, is a funny disturbing tale about a new future in which the lawful are locked up and the lawless roam free.

  Stephen King calls Abigail Thomas "the Emily Dickinson of memoirists."

Her latest book, What Comes Next and How to Like It, is an extraordinarily moving memoir about many things, but at the center is a steadfast friendship between Abigail Thomas and a man she met thirty-five years ago.

  Twenty-five years ago when Mathew Burrows went to work for the CIA as an intelligence analyst, the world seemed frozen. Then came the fall of the Berlin Wall and the implosion of the Soviet Union; suddenly, unpredictability became a universal theme and foresight was critical. For the past decade, Burrows has overseen the creation of the Global Trends report—the key futurist guide for the White House, Departments of State and Defense, and Homeland Security.

In The Future, Declassified: Megatrends That Will Undo the World Unless We Take Action, Burrows has expanded the most recent Global Trends report into a full-length narrative, forecasting the tectonic shifts that will drive us to 2030.

    

  Alan Weisman is the author of the critically acclaimed New York Times best seller The World Without Us. In his new book, Countdown: Our Last, Best Hope for a Future on Earth? the award-winning journalist traveled to more than 20 countries to ask what experts agreed were probably the most important questions on Earth--and also the hardest: How many humans can the planet hold without capsizing? How robust must the Earth's ecosystem be to assure our continued existence? Can we know which other species are essential to our survival? And, how might we actually arrive at a stable, optimum population, and design an economy to allow genuine prosperity without endless growth?

    Doctor and social activist Paul Farmer is one of the most passionate and influential voices for global health equity and social justice. In his new book, To Repair the World, he encourages young people to tackle the greatest challenges of our times.