gay

  Poster Boy is a new American musical inspired by actual events surrounding the 2010 suicide of Tyler Clementi, a college student who brought national attention to cyber-bullying, In the show, a community of gay men in an online chat room come together to discover what drove one of their own to take his life.

Directed by Olivier Award-nominee Stafford Arima with movement by Danny Mefford, Poster Boy, is in its world premiere production on the Nikos Stage at the Williamstown Theatre Festival through August 7th.

Composer and lyricist, Craig Carnelia and bookwriter Joe Tracz join us.

  New England in the late nineteenth century was home to a set of high-spirited and ambitious writers who were, for the first time, creating a distinctly American literature. From this close-knit literary society emerged Herman Melville and Nathaniel Hawthorne, who were known to be friends. In The Whale: A Love Story, novelist Mark Beauregard explores the boundaries of this friendship.

Through a nuanced reading of Melville’s real letters and other original sources, Beauregard offers the fictionalized story of two men who shared a deep, emotionally charged bond that may have transformed the writing—and meaning—of Moby-Dick. Scholars, academics, and essayists have written about Melville and Hawthorne’s relationship, trying to suss out what may have really happened between them.

Sarah S. Kilborne
Jane O’Connor

  The Lavender Blues is a showcase of queer music before World War II. It is music history. It is queer history. It is women's history. It is great entertainment.

With The Lavender Blues, modern cabaret performer Sarah Kilborne brings to light for the first time the quiet, yet powerful emergence between the world wars of songs that spoke about what it was like to be gay or "in the life."

From such legends as Ma Rainey, Bessie Smith, Gladys Bentley and Josephine Baker, Kilborne performs songs - written almost a century ago - that describe what it is like to be non-binary. The themes in the music are as emblematic of yesterday as they are relevant today, addressing issues of masculinity, femininity, same-sex love, cross-dressing, the desire for freedom from prejudice and more.

Sarah Kilborne is bringing the show to The Linda in Albany, NY on Friday night.

  The son of a Baptist pastor and deeply embedded in church life in small town Arkansas, as a young man Garrard Conley was terrified and conflicted about his sexuality.
 
When Garrard was a nineteen-year-old college student, he was outed to his parents, and was forced to make a life-changing decision: either agree to attend a church-supported conversion therapy program that promised to “cure” him of homosexuality; or risk losing family, friends, and the God he had prayed to every day of his life. Through an institutionalized Twelve-Step Program heavy on Bible study, he was supposed to emerge heterosexual, ex-gay, cleansed of impure urges and stronger in his faith in God for his brush with sin. Instead, even when faced with a harrowing and brutal journey, Garrard found the strength and understanding to break out in search of his true self and forgiveness. 

His book is Boy Erased: A Memoir.

On the evening of June 24th 1973 a fire tore through a bar in New Orleans’ French quarter where a group of gay men were meeting for a religious service, 32 died in the blaze.  Though it was the largest massacre of gay people in American history no one called it a tragedy, and no one tried to understand the purpose of the meeting-it was a religious service. The men were part of a growing religious movement that developed in the 1970s that has since been forgotten and overshadowed by the HIV/AIDS epidemic of the 1980s.

In his new book Stand By Me: The Forgotten History of Gay Liberation, historian Jim Downs uses the story of that fateful night as a jumping off point for a wide ranging narrative revealing that gay life in America in the 1970s was far richer and more varied than has been remembered. In short, gay life in that decade was about far more than just sex. He shows us gay people standing together as friends, fellow believers and colleagues to create a sense of community among  people who felt alienated from mainstream American life. Jim Downs is an Associate Professor of History at Connecticut College and an Andrew W. Mellon New Directions Fellow at Harvard University.

The fight for gay, lesbian, and trans civil rights, the years of outrageous injustice, the early battles, the defeats, and the victories beyond the dreams of the gay rights pioneers is a powerful civil rights issue of the present day.

In her new book, The Gay Revolution: The Story of the Struggle, scholar Lillian Faderman provides an account for the fight for LGBTQ rights. Lillian Faderman is an internationally respected scholar of lesbian history and literature. She is the author of several award winning books on LGBT history including, Surpassing the Love of Men and Odd Girls.

  Raised like a princess in one of the most powerful families in the American South, Henrietta Bingham was offered the helm of a publishing empire. Instead, she ripped through the Jazz Age like an F. Scott Fitzgerald character: intoxicating and intoxicated, selfish and shameless, seductive and brilliant, endearing and often terribly troubled.

In New York, Louisville, and London, she drove both men and women wild with desire, and her youth blazed with sex. But her love affairs with women made her the subject of derision and caused a doctor to try to cure her queerness. After the speed and pleasure of her early days, the toxicity of judgment from others coupled with her own anxieties resulted in years of addiction and breakdowns.

Emily Bingham, the great-niece of Henrietta Bingham, writes about her life in Irrepressible: The Jazz Age Life of Henrietta Bingham.

Report Studied School Harassment Among LGBT Students

Nov 17, 2014

High school can be a tough time for many young people, but especially so for students who are gay, lesbian, bisexual or transgender. A new survey indicates those students can still face harassment, both verbal and physical, in the halls of the nation's high schools. Wayne Bowmanchester is a board member of the Capital Region chapter of GLSEN, the gay, lesbian, straight education network. He says student attitudes were recently surveyed as part of a national effort.

10/20/14 Panel

Oct 20, 2014

  Today's panelists are WAMC’s Alan Chartock, Political Consultant Libby Post and University at Albany Journalism Professor and Investigative Reporter, Rosemary Armao.

Topics include:
Texas Hospital Apology
Catholic Church Gay U-Turn
NY No Gun List
Voter ID Decision
Black Vote for Senate
Opera Protest

  Yes, there has been a seismic shift in attitudes about gays in American politics and culture. Our reigning national story is that a new era of rainbow acceptance is at hand. But dig a bit deeper, and this seemingly brave new gay world is disappointing.

In The Tolerance Trap, Suzanna Walters takes on received wisdom about gay identities and gay rights, arguing that we are not “almost there,” but on the contrary have settled for a watered-down goal of tolerance and acceptance rather than a robust claim to full civil rights.

Suzanna Danuta Walters has written and lectured extensively on sexuality, popular culture, and feminism and is currently the Director of Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies and Professor of Sociology at Northeastern University.

    Big Gay Hudson Valley is holding their first-ever Queen City Pride celebration in Poughkeepsie the weekend of June 5th through 8th. They’ve given their classic “Pride Preview Weekend” a new date, new time, and a host of all-new events.

Events include Night Out At Vassar on Thursday June 5th; Big 80s Cosmic Bowling hosted by Trixie Starr on Friday, June 6th; Hudson Valley Gay Life Expo on Saturday June 7th; Beefcake Dinner also on the 7th; and the Big Gay Summer Picnic on Sunday, June 8th.

Here now to tell us more is Stephan Hengst, Co-Founder of Big Gay Hudson Valley.com and the organizer of Queen City Pride.

5/19/14 Panel

May 19, 2014

  Today's panelists are WAMC’s Alan Chartock, University at Albany Journalism Professor and Investigative Reporter, Rosemary Armao and political consultant Libby Post.

Topics include:
VA Data
DirecTV Deal
California Chrome
3 Gay GOP Candidates
Student Debt Study

    The Easton Mountain Retreat Center is an LGBTQ retreat center in Greenwich, New York. Part of Easton's mission as a non-profit organization is to work towards peace, nonviolence, and social justice and they are interested in cultivating the future leaders of America's gay rights movement.

Later this month, they will be holding their eighth consecutive summer program for LGBTQ youth, a four-day arts camp and leadership summit called Arts in the Woods. This weekend, they will also be holding a weekend-long LGBTQ music festival called Out in the Woods to fundraise for scholarships for disenfranchised young people to attend the camp.

John Stasio, Founder of Easton Mountain, and Wil Fisher, their Director of Youth Programming, join us to tell us more.

7/30/13 - Panel

Jul 30, 2013

Today's panelists are WAMC's Alan Chartock, Associate Editor of The Times Union Mike Spain, and WAMC Newsman, Ray Graf. Joe Donahue moderates.

Topics include:
On Gay Priests, Pope Francis Asks, ‘Who Am I to Judge?’
Verdict to Be Read on Tuesday for Bradley Manning WikiLeaks Case
NYTimes: William Scranton, Former Pennsylvania Governor, Dies at 96
Scientists Seek to Rein In Diagnoses of Cancer
Saratoga 150 Track Attendance Down

4/30/13 - Panel

Apr 30, 2013

  Today's panelists are WAMC’s Alan Chartock, and Ray Graf and Mike Spain, Associate Editor of The Times Union. Joe Donahue moderates.

Today's topics include:

  • Dredging
  • NBA player, Jason Collins announcing that he is gay
  • Sexual harassment in jails
Flickr / Paul Lowry

IRVING, Texas (AP) — The Boy Scouts of America's national executive board has delayed a decision on whether to lift its longstanding ban on gay scouts and leaders.

BSA said Wednesday the organization will take action on the resolution at its national meeting in May.

The organization said last week it was considering a shift of its policy, which has led officials to remove gay leaders and scouts. That announcement pushed years of debate over the policy to an even higher level.

Flickr / Paul Lowry

The Boy Scouts of America appear poised to lift a longstanding ban on gay scouts and scout leaders as soon as their national executive board meeting, scheduled for next week.

Last summer, The Boy Scouts of America officially banned the participation of homosexuals as scouts or troop leaders.

The BSA will revisit the policy in their national executive board meeting and are expected to reverse that decision.

What do you think?

In the spring of 2009, John Schwartz got a distress call from his wife. His 13-year old son, Joe, was on his way to the hospital after a failed suicide attempt.

Joe, a socially awkward but smart boy, had finally mustered the courage to come out as gay to his classmates who responded with discomfort and dismay. Hours later, he took dozens of Benadryl capsules with the intention of killing himself.

We speak with Linda Hirshman about her book, Victory: The Triumphant Gay Revolution. She will be talking about and signing her book this Sunday – July 8th – from 4-5 PM at the Roeliff Jansen Community Library in Hillsdale, NY. 

The Eighth Annual Pride March and Festival sponsored by the Hudson Valley LGBTQ Community Center steps off on Sunday, June 3rd on Main Street in New Paltz. We learn more about it and the other work Hudson Valley LGBTQ does from Virginia Apuzzo (Founding President and Life Time Board Member) and Jan Whitman (Founding Board Member).

A court in New York says it's no longer slander to falsely call someone gay because it's not something society sees as negative anymore.

The mid-level appeals court says that although falsely calling someone gay or lesbian has for decades been grounds for slander, that's no longer the case.

The decision Thursday by the mid-level appeals court involves the case of a Broome County man who sued a woman who called him gay in what he says was an effort to get his girlfriend to leave him. He says it hurt his relationship.

We welcome Zach Wahls and speak with him about his book, My Two Moms: Lessons of Love, Strength, and What Makes a Family .

Screencap from "The Perfect Family"

Star of stage and screen, Kathleen Turner, plays the lead in Anne Renton's film, The Perfect Family. The film is screening on May 5th in Northampton, Massachusetts as the season finale of the Out! For Reel series. Out! for Reel is a popular lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender film series for New England.