general electric

Composite Image by Dave Lucas (WAMC)

The New York Department of Environmental Conservation is locking horns with the Environmental Protection Agency over dredging and PCB's in the Hudson River.

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The Saratoga County Water Authority’s action against General Electric began in 2011. Due to pollution of the Hudson River caused by GE’s PCB dredging operations, Saratoga County had to move its plant to the town of Moreau, in the northern portion of the county. Most of the population and customer base, however, is located in the southern portion of the county.

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency met yesterday with stakeholders in Saratoga Springs as it kicks off its second five-year review of GE’s Hudson River PCB cleanup.

Dredging of the Hudson River
EPA

The EPA will undertake a second five-year review of GE’s cleanup of PCBs from the Hudson River. Dredging on a 40-mile stretch between Fort Edward and Troy, New York was finished this fall. Now, General Electric will remain on the river for monitoring and habitat restoration work.

A stretch of the Housatonic River undergoing remediation in 2012.
Berkshire Environmental Action Team

General Electric is moving forward on dispute resolutions with the EPA, saying the agency’s cleanup plan for the Housatonic River cannot be reconciled. The company dumped PCBs into the waterway from its Pittsfield facility until the chemical was banned in 1977.

Lucas Willard / WAMC

After first announcing its exit from Fort Edward last October, General Electric has pushed back the closure of its capacitor manufacturing facility until May.

This is a picture of a stretch of the Housatonic River undergoing remediation in 2012.
Berkshire Environmental Action Team

The back and forth between the Environmental Protection Agency and General Electric over the cleanup of the Housatonic River continues. In the latest move, the company is railing against the agency’s remediation proposal.

This is a picture of General Electric's logo
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General Electric has announced that it is taking its world headquarters from Fairfield, Connecticut to Boston after word of a move swirled for months.

Dredging of the Hudson River
EPA

A coalition of environmental groups Thursday filed a petition to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency asking General Electric to pursue additional PCB dredging in the Hudson River.

This is a picture of General Electric's logo
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General Electric Chief Executive Jeff Immelt says the conglomerate will "always have a big presence in Connecticut," though he confirmed the company is still looking for a new headquarters site.

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Federal regulators have approved General Electric's plan to dismantle a Hudson River PCB cleanup plant used during six years of dredging, which concluded this fall.

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is asking for public input on a plan to dismantle and decontaminate a processing facility that was built to support PCB dredging efforts in the upper Hudson. While many officials from surrounding communities have called for additional dredging, others would like to see things wrapped up sooner.  

General Electric Co. may move up to 500 American jobs overseas because Congress did not renew a government program that allows foreign companies to borrow money to buy U.S. products.

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Connecticut Governor Dannel Malloy says he met earlier this month with General Electric officials to offer some incentives to keep the company from moving out of state.

Dredging of the Hudson River
EPA

A vast majority of New York State Assemblymembers this week sent letters to General Electric and Governor Andrew Cuomo asking for more PCB removal along the Hudson River.

CT.gov

Connecticut Governor Dannel Malloy is leaving the door open for possible revision of business tax hikes approved by the legislature as General Electric looks at moving its headquarters out of the state in response to the increases.

Berkshire Environmental Action Team

General Electric disagrees with the Environmental Protection Agency’s cleanup plan for the contaminated Housatonic River. The company argues the proposal goes against EPA precedents, causing unnecessary destruction to the river’s ecosystem and the lives of people living nearby.

Berkshire Environmental Action Team

General Electric has filed formal comments on the U.S. EPA’s cleanup plan for the Housatonic River. The company dumped harmful chemicals called PCBs into the river from its Pittsfield plant from the 1930s until the substance was banned in 1977. GE is now responsible for cleanup work.

Lucas Willard / WAMC

Officials gathered in Saratoga County Tuesday to tour a new General Electric Fuel Cell facility and to announce a new partnership between GE and a local community college.

GE Fuel Cells held a tour of its new facility at the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority’s Saratoga Technology + Energy Park in Malta.

Stakeholders and members of the media got a chance to take a sneak peak at the manufacturing process that will be used to create hybrid fuel cells.

Assemblymember Angelo Santabarbara Official Website

The mills and factories of Upstate New York were often the first step toward a new life for immigrants to America many years ago. Companies such as General Electric in Schenectady and the rug-makers of Amsterdam provided the work for the Irish, Germans, Italians and others who came to stake their claims in America. Many of those factories and mills are gone, but there's new high-tech manufacturing under way in upstate highlighted again by Tuesday's announcement of a $500 million consortium involving the state and General Electric.

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The Hudson River PCB cleanup project is nearly 75 percent complete as the fourth season of dredging comes to a close. An Environmental Protection Agency regional administrator delivered a progress report while an environmental group is calling on General Electric to clean up additional PCBs. 

EPA Regional Administrator Judith Enck says the 2013 dredging season comes to a close in a few days, putting the entire project about a year ahead of schedule.

Berkshire Communities Join In PCB Cleanup

Oct 22, 2013

Several Berkshire, Massachusetts County communities are banding together, figuring there's strength in numbers when it comes seeking financial compensation from General Electric during the PCB cleanup of the Housatonic River.

Lenox last week joined Lee, Stockbridge, Great Barrington and Sheffield to join the effort, and Pittsfield is expected to join Tuesday.

Nathaniel Karns, executive director of the Berkshire Regional Planning Commission, tells The Berkshire Eagle that together the communities can hire a law firm to negotiate with GE.

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Close to 200 workers in Fort Edward are facing layoffs after General  Electric announced that it is considering a shutdown of an upstate manufacturing facility, unless an otherwise agreement is reached with the union representing employees.

GE Energy Management has announced that it intends to move all manufacturing operations from its Fort Edward plant to a facility in Clearwater, Florida. The move would close the Fort Edward plant, and 198 employees could be affected.

Lucas Willard / WAMC

Representatives of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, General Electric, and the state governments of Connecticut and Massachusetts, recently met with stakeholders to provide updates on the cleanup plan for removing PCB’s from the Housatonic River and Silver Lake in Pittsfield.

At an EPA Housatonic River Citizens Coordinating Council meeting at the Lenox Library Wednesday evening, community stakeholders raised concerns over information presented on a status update of the cleanup project at Silver Lake in Pittsfield.

General Electric has agreed to analyze its potential liability in relation to recently-discovered PCBs in the upper Hudson River. GE will soon resume its remediation of PCBs it discharged into the Hudson decades ago, and at least one environmental group hopes the company will incorporate the additional dredging this year.

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General Electric Co. says it will study a possible expansion of its PCB cleanup of the upper Hudson River after a request by New York state Comptroller Thomas DiNapoli.

GE, which released poly-chlorinated biphenyls into the river decades ago, is preparing for a fourth season of dredging as part of a federal Superfund project. But DiNapoli says Monday that GE could potentially be found liable for contamination outside the Superfund site and filed a shareholder resolution calling on the company to evaluate its risks.

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The Hudson River PCB-cleanup project is about halfway through, and both governmental officials as well as environmental advocates provided an update on the Superfund project Wednesday. What has not yet begun is a project to restore the Hudson River’s natural resources, including fish and wildlife, but planning for the restoration is underway.

WAMC's David Guistina gets the morning headlines from Mike Spain, associate editor of the Albany Times-Union.