General Electric Co.

Speakers at podium
WAMC photo by Dave Lucas

Calling it a hub of job creation and economic activity critical to the regional economy, U.S. Senator Charles Schumer visited the Port of Albany today. The New York Democrat announced a major push to secure a federal grant for the port he says will help upstate manufacturers export their products across the nation and globe via the Hudson River.

(Airs 5/5/16) Today at 1 O'clock- WAMC’s Alan Chartock In A Live Panel Discussion At WAMC's Performing Arts Studio with Ned Sullivan, President of Scenic Hudson; David Carpenter, MD, Director of the Institute for Health and the Environment at the University at Albany; and NYS Assemblywoman Carrie Woerner – a Democrat from the 113th District/Round Lake New York. They review John Bowermaster's short documentary film PCBs: GE’s and the EPA’s Toxic Legacy, and discuss why they think GE should be required by the EPA to do more dredging in order to meet the goal of cleaning up the Hudson River.  You can find out more at 

Lucas Willard / WAMC

After first announcing its exit from Fort Edward last October, General Electric has pushed back the closure of its capacitor manufacturing facility until May.

This is a picture of General Electric's logo

General Electric is moving its world headquarters from Fairfield, Connecticut to Boston.

This is a picture of General Electric's logo
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General Electric Chief Executive Jeff Immelt says the conglomerate will "always have a big presence in Connecticut," though he confirmed the company is still looking for a new headquarters site.

34 workers in Schenectady are losing their jobs as General Electric has announced it will stop manufacturing a high-tech battery.

Composite Image by Dave Lucas (WAMC)

Federal regulators have approved General Electric's plan to dismantle a Hudson River PCB cleanup plant used during six years of dredging, which concluded this fall.

  New York and Connecticut are battling over G.E.

In today’s Congressional Corner, Connecticut Senator Chris Murphy tells WAMC’s Alan Chartock that he’s working hard to keep the company in the Nutmeg State.

General Electric says it has completed its sixth and final year of dredging sediment contaminated with polychlorinated biphenyls from the upper Hudson River.

Connecticut Governor Dannel Malloy says he met earlier this month with General Electric officials to offer some incentives to keep the company from moving out of state.

Dredging of the Hudson River

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and General Electric have announced the start of the final season of dredging on the Hudson River.

Dredging of the Hudson River

As General Electric enters its final season of dredging on the Hudson River, trustees responsible for ensuring the public is compensated for the damage caused by PCBs have issued a report on the affects of the chemical contaminants on fish.

WAMC photo by Dave Lucas

Arguing "it's now or never for the Hudson River and communities up and down its shores," activists gathered along the riverbank in Green Island today to urge General Electric to meet responsibilities beyond the current EPA-mandated PCB cleanup.

GE is slated to complete an EPA-ordered cleanup as early as this summer, one environmentalists say will leave behind millions of pounds of health-threatening PCB-contaminated sediments both north and south of the Federal Dam in Troy.

New York State environmental officials have released details of a plan to clean toxic chemicals from a General Electric facility on the upper Hudson River.

The New York State Department of Environmental Conservation has opened a public comment period on a proposed remedy for the PCB contamination found at the G.E. Fort Edward Plant Site.

PCBs were used by GE in its capacitor manufacturing there. For three decades the chemicals were dumped into the nearby Hudson River.

Dredging of the Hudson River

General Electric and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency have reached an agreement to study and develop a cleanup plan for the shorelines along the upper Hudson River, where GE has been dredging to remove contaminants for the past five years.

WAMC's David Guistina talks with Judy Patrick of the Daily Gazette about GE's newest startup, a fuel cell business that will operate from the Saratoga Technology and Energy Park in Malta and the high cost of school supplies.

General Electric is wrapping up construction on its new center at the New York State Energy Research and Development Agency-operated Saratoga Technology + Energy Park in Malta.

Johanna Wellington, general manager and chief technical officer for GE Fuel Cells, said General Electric is about to launch operations at the pilot facility to develop hybrid fuel cell technology.

Wellington said the fuel cell program that began at GE’s Global Research Center in Niskayuna is expanding.

    In today’s Congressional Corner, New York representative Paul Tonko tells WAMC’s Alan Chartock about the new high-tech lab at General Electric.

Governor Andrew Cuomo

New York Governor Andrew Cuomo was at General Electric in Niskayuna today to announce an energy initiative to commercialize new technology that will have major implications for the electronics market.

Flickr/Andrew Magill

General Electric has reportedly agreed to pay close to $8 million to settle a portion of five-year-old lawsuit brought by Saratoga County municipalities related to the company’s dredging on the Hudson River.

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Federal agencies have sent a letter to General Electric over concerns related to a recent Hudson River cleanup report. 

The Federal Hudson River Natural Resource Trustees recently sent a letter to General Electric to, as the group contends, address misinformation and correct the public record on a Hudson River Project Report submitted by the company to the New York State comptroller’s office in late December.

WAMC Photo by Dave Lucas

Results of a study requested by New York state comptroller Thomas DiNapoli and released late Friday show no need for General Electric to voluntarily expand dredging that's already under way in a portion of the upper Hudson River contaminated with PCBs.

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General Electric has announced that it will shutter its Fort Edward plant, but the union representing employees says it will fight its members’ jobs. 

General Electric says it plans to lay off up to 200 salaried employees at its Schenectady-based Power & Water Division by the end of this year.

According to GE officials, the Fairfield, CT based company is eliminating the white-collar positions to remain competitive. While they wouldn't divulge the exact number of employees to be laid off, 15 hundred workers at the Schenectady steam turbine and generator plant will not be affected.

General Electric  has announced that it has signed three contracts to sell about $2.7 billion in gas and steam turbine equipment to the North African nation of Algeria.

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Close to 200 workers in Fort Edward are facing layoffs after General  Electric announced that it is considering a shutdown of an upstate manufacturing facility, unless an otherwise agreement is reached with the union representing employees.

GE Energy Management has announced that it intends to move all manufacturing operations from its Fort Edward plant to a facility in Clearwater, Florida. The move would close the Fort Edward plant, and 198 employees could be affected.

GE Plans To Move Upstate NY Capacitor Work To Fla.

Sep 19, 2013

General Electric Co. says it plans to close an electrical components plant in upstate New York and move the work to Florida.

Local media outlets report that the Fairfield, Conn., company gave union workers in Fort Edward notice on Wednesday it could close by September 2014.

The United Electrical, Radio and Machine Workers of America and GE have a 60-day window to negotiate over the planned shutdown. The union says it will fight it.