global

  When Abraham Lincoln delivered the Gettysburg Address in 1863, he had broader aims than simply rallying a war-weary nation. Lincoln realized that the Civil War had taken on a wider significance—that all of Europe and Latin America was watching to see whether the United States, a beleaguered model of democracy, would indeed “perish from the earth.”

In The Cause of All Nations: An International History of the American Civil War, distinguished historian Don H. Doyle explains that the Civil War was viewed abroad as part of a much larger struggle for democracy that spanned the Atlantic Ocean, and had begun with the American and French Revolutions.

  The world is blowing up. Every day a new blaze seems to ignite: the bloody implosion of Iraq and Syria; the East-West standoff in Ukraine; abducted schoolgirls in northern Nigeria. Is there some thread tying these frightening international security crises together?

In a riveting account that weaves history with fast-moving reportage and insider accounts from the Afghanistan war, Sarah Chayes identifies the unexpected link - corruption - in her book, Thieves of State: Why Corruption Threatens Global Security.

  Crude oil's global collapse is now expected to soon push the national average U.S. price for gasoline below $2 a gallon for the first time since early 2009.

Nationally, regular unleaded gasoline currently averages about $2.12 a gallon, down 46 cents from just four weeks ago and $1.01 cheaper than year-ago levels. Gas prices are also expected to fall more than previously forecast for the full year.

To talk about plummeting gas prices, we welcome economist Hugh Johnson of Hugh Johnson Advisors for his thoughts on what is happening with gas and oil prices.

  Twenty-five years ago when Mathew Burrows went to work for the CIA as an intelligence analyst, the world seemed frozen. Then came the fall of the Berlin Wall and the implosion of the Soviet Union; suddenly, unpredictability became a universal theme and foresight was critical. For the past decade, Burrows has overseen the creation of the Global Trends report—the key futurist guide for the White House, Departments of State and Defense, and Homeland Security.

In The Future, Declassified: Megatrends That Will Undo the World Unless We Take Action, Burrows has expanded the most recent Global Trends report into a full-length narrative, forecasting the tectonic shifts that will drive us to 2030.

 We welcome Rich Honen - with Phillips Lytle LLP, where he is the partner in charge of the Albany office.

    A cosmopolitan, by definition, is a “citizen of the universe” — someone who engages with issues across the globe, from politics, to war, to climate change. For example, we listen to WAMC, read the newspaper, check our Facebook pages and act like dutifully connected people.

But the Director of the MIT Center for Civic Media, Ethan Zuckerman, argues that we’re living in a state of “imaginary cosmopolitanism.” We expose ourselves to limited kinds of information, particularly that which is already of interest to us or to those closest to us. He confronts this issue in his new book, Rewire: Digital Cosmopolitans in the Age of Connection.

    In an unparalleled collaboration, two leading global thinkers in technology and foreign affairs give us their widely anticipated, transformational vision of the future: a world where everyone is connected—a world full of challenges and benefits that are ours to meet and to harness.

Humankind is endlessly fascinated with maps, and we are surrounded by them now more than ever.

In On the Map: A Mind-Expanding Exploration of the Way the World Looks by Simon Garfield, Garfield explores the unique ways that maps reflect human history and how they are a key part of our evolution as a species.

We welcome Ian Bremmer, founder and president of Eurasia Group, and speak with him about his book, Every Nation for Itself: Winners and Losers in a G-Zero World