The Great Gatsby

  Best known for The Great Gatsby - F. Scott Fitzgerald was born in 1896, in St. Paul, Minnesota. The success of his first novel made him famous and let him marry the woman he loved, but he later descended into drinking and his wife had a mental breakdown.

Following the unsuccessful Tender is the Night, Fitzgerald moved to Hollywood and became a scriptwriter. He died of a heart attack in 1940, at age 44, his final novel only half completed. Today marks the 75th anniversary of his death.

In her book, So We Read On, Fresh Air book critic Maureen Corrigan offers a fresh perspective on what makes Gatsby great – and utterly unusual.

    Best known for The Great Gatsby - F. Scott Fitzgerald was born in 1896, in St. Paul, Minnesota. The success of his first novel made him famous and let him marry the woman he loved, but he later descended into drinking and his wife had a mental breakdown.

Following the unsuccessful Tender is the Night, Fitzgerald moved to Hollywood and became a scriptwriter. He died of a heart attack in 1940, at age 44, his final novel only half completed. Today marks the 75th anniversary of his death.

In novelist Stewart O' Nan’s latest novel, West of Sunset, he imagines F. Scott Fitzgerald's final years, which he spent in Hollywood. He is living in an apartment, in poor health, struggling with alcoholism, and is increasingly despondent over his declining literary reputation.

  

  The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald is a revered classic and a rite of passage in the reading lives of millions. In her new book, So We Read On, Fresh Air book critic Maureen Corrigan offers a fresh perspective on what makes Gatsby great – and utterly unusual.

Rob Edelman: Great Novels, Not-So-Great Movies

May 20, 2013

Sometimes, novels that are American classics have been transformed into motion pictures that are American classics. FROM HERE TO ETERNITY, TO KILL A MOCKINGBIRD, THE GRAPES OF WRATH, ONE FLEW OVER THE CUCKOO’S NEST, and FIELD OF DREAMS (based on Ray Kinsella’s Shoeless Joe) are a few that come to mind. Some-- ALL THE KING’S MEN, for example-- have been the source for films that deserve all the acclaim they earn and remakes that are, in a word, execrable.