health care

In Albany today, state legislators, patient advocates, labor leaders, and health care professionals unveiled a new proposal for government funded, universal, single-payer statewide health insurance.

WAMC’s Patrick Donges spoke today with New York Assemblyman Richard Gottfried, Democrat of Manhattan’s 75th district, sponsor of the bill and chair of the Assembly Health Committee.

Marlith/Wikimedia

A Vermont House committee has reversed itself and approved a penny-an-ounce tax on sugar-sweetened beverages to pay for health care subsidies, but the idea still appears to have a bumpy road ahead.

The House Health Care Committee had defeated the measure on a 5-5 tie vote on Friday. But on Wednesday, the panel voted in two 7-4 tallies to advance the measure.

Marlith/Wikimedia

A Vermont House committee has killed legislation that would have levied a new tax on sugary soft drinks.

In a move that drew the comment "Holy Smokes!" from a member of the Senate Health and Welfare committee, the House panel voted 5-5 on the measure. The tie vote killed the bill the committee had spent weeks drafting.

The money would pay for public health education and to help smooth the transition to a health care overhaul.

BOSTON (AP) — Massachusetts will begin offering stand-alone dental plans for children and adults through the state's Health Connector starting next year.

State health officials say making dental care more readily available will improve the overall health of Massachusetts residents.

Dental coverage is one of several changes coming to the state's health care exchange.

Beginning in 2014, insurers seeking to offer plans through the connector must not only meet state requirements but also federal requirements to receive the connector's seal of approval.

It's looking increasingly likely that $85 billion of automatic federal budget cuts known as a sequester will come to pass if Congress doesn't act by March 1.

Darnyi Zsoka/Wikimedia Commons Public Domain

An official leading Vermont's push toward a single-payer health care system is calling efforts to coordinate electronic medical record between providers "wicked hard."

Anya Rader Wallack, chairwoman of the Green Mountain Care Board, briefed the House Appropriations Committee on Thursday on progress the board has been making to retool Vermont's health care system.

  In the September 2009 issue of the Atlantic, David Goldhill rocked the health-care world with his compelling account of how bureaucratic American health care killed his father. Now, Goldhill is back with a new book expanding on the topic, published by Knopf, entitled Catastrophic Care: How American Health Care Killed My Father--and How We Can Fix It.

WAMC

The administration of Vermont Governor Peter Shumlin says it wants more time to firm up the financing for a single-payer health plan to be in place by 2017.

A health care law passed two years ago gave the administration until this month to develop a financing plan. But hopes were then for a federal waiver that would allow the planned Green Mountain Care program to start in 2014. That waiver hasn't been forthcoming, pushing the date back three years.

taxcredits.net / Creative Commons

Officials from Burlington's Fletcher Allen Health Care, the Dartmouth Hitchcock Medical Center and other hospitals serving Vermont are joining to announce the creation of the nation's first statewide "accountable care organization".

Blair Horner: From one cliff to the next

Jan 7, 2013
Blair Horner
C.W. McKeen / The Post - Standard, 2006

After long and contentious negotiations that extended late into New Year’s Day, Congress passed a measure to at least temporarily avert the most immediate consequences of the so-called “fiscal cliff.”  As you no doubt saw in media coverage over the holidays, on New Year’s Day Democratic and Republican leaders settled on a fared-down package of income tax rate increases for the well-to-do and did little on spending reductions.

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