hemlock woolly adelgid

Emerald Ash Borer
courtesy NYS DEC

Invasive species are spreading across the region.  The summer is a prime season for the non-native insects to move to new habitats, threatening native ecosystems. New York State Department of Environmental Conservation Lands and Forests Research Scientist Jerry Carlson is also Chief of Forest Health and Protection, making him responsible for identifying changes in the forest environment statewide.  Originally trained as an entomologist, Carlson sat down to discuss the increasing risk of invasive insects throughout eastern New York.

Invasive Pest Harms Hemlocks In The Catskills

Jan 30, 2015
Hemlock Woolly Adelgid
Courtesy of the U.S. Department of Agriculture

A new study has found hemlock trees in the Catskill region have been declining in health amid an invasive pest infestation.

Courtesy Vermont Department of Forest Parks and Recreation

A training session has been set to for volunteers to be on alert for an invasive insect.
Courtesy Vermont Department of Forest Parks and Recreation

Nearly 400 small black beetles have been released onto four Vermont hemlock trees near the Massachusetts state line to feed off an insect that's been destroying the trees.

The trees in Pownal are infested by the woolly adelgid. The plan is for the beetles to reproduce, spread and control the adelgid population. The beetle, a native of the Pacific northwest, eats nothing but adelgids.

The Bennington Banner reports the trees are on property owned by Williamstown, Massachusetts.