high speed rail


$120 million in federal and state money was spent over the last three years to build a high speed rail line, with new track, ties, switches, and stations, running parallel to the Connecticut River in Massachusetts.  Now local officials are working to get more trains running on that line called the Knowledge Corridor.


What officials said is the final piece of funding for a major transportation project in western Massachusetts was announced today in Springfield.

Massachusetts is committing the remaining funds needed to complete the redevelopment of Union Station in Springfield into an intermodal regional transportation hub. It brings the total amount of federal, state, and local funds for the project to $88.5 million.


A new financing plan was announced today to accelerate the redevelopment of Union Station in Springfield, Massachusetts

       City officials said a proposed addition of $3.2 million in local funds along with a previously announced $4.2 million grant from the state will allow the transit-focused elements of the project to be completed simultaneously with tenant-ready commercial space and additional parking.

     "It is a big achievement having all the money that is now needed to get this project done," said Springfield Mayor Domenic Sarno.


With an $82 million renovation of the derelict Union Station in Springfield, Massachusetts under way, officials went looking for guidance from transit-oriented development in two Connecticut cities.

A delegation of business and civic leaders from greater Springfield got a possible glimpse of the future when they looked out over the ornate great hall of Union Station in New Haven, Ct. where 11,000 people a day pass through mostly off commuter trains to New York City.


Work is nearly finished on a federally-funded upgrade to the rail line that parallels I-91 between New Haven, Connecticut and the Massachusetts border with Vermont.  The line, dubbed the “Knowledge Corridor,” will soon see faster, but still limited, Amtrak service.  But transportation officials and politicians see great potential for expanded commuter rail.  


Massachusetts Governor Deval Patrick announced a milestone agreement today in the effort to bring high- speed passenger rail service to western Massachusetts.

Governor Patrick arrived in Greenfield onboard a train from North Adams to announce a tentative agreement to have the state purchase the rail line between East Northfield on the Vermont border and Springfield.  The 49-mile stretch is nearing the completion of a major restoration that will return passenger rail service to communities along the Connecticut River.

8/7/14 Panel

Aug 7, 2014

  Today's panelists are Political Activist Libby Post, Publisher Emeritus of The Daily Freeman, Ira Fusfeld, and associate editor of the Times-Union, Mike Spain.

Topics include:
Border Patrol
High Speed Rail
Smoker's Happiness
Hot Car Death
Nixon Resignation Anniversary

Sturmovik at en.wikipedia

A $73 million project to restore passenger rail service along the Connecticut River line in Massachusetts, dubbed the Knowledge Corridor, is on track to be finished by the end of this year. The rail infrastructure improvements bring the promise of speedier Amtrak service and the potential for commuter rail service.  WAMC’s Pioneer Valley Bureau Chief Paul Tuthill spoke with Dana Roscoe, a transportation expert with the Pioneer Valley Planning Commission.

WAMC Photo by Dave Lucas

The state Department of Transportation has extended the public comment period on plans for high-speed rail service between New York City and upstate New York.


State Transportation Secretary Richard Davey is pressing the Massachusetts Senate to approve a transportation bond bill as a new construction season approaches.  The $12.7 billion bond bill approved earlier this month in a unanimous vote in the Massachusetts House includes funding for some long-sought projects in western Massachusetts.