In his new book, A Nation Of Nations: A Great American Immigration Story, veteran NPR correspondent  Tom Gjelten assesses the impact and importance of the 1965 Immigration and Naturalization Act by interweaving the story a handful of immigrant families with the history and analysis of the immigration changes in America as a whole. The fiftieth anniversary of the 1965 act is this month and immigration continues to be a hot button issue in American politics.

Tom Gjelten is a long time NPR news correspondent, he's covered wars in Central America, the Middle East, and the former Yugoslavia, as well as major national stories in the United States. His NPR reporting has won him two Overseas Press Club Awards, a George Polk Award, and a Robert F. Kennedy Journalism Award. 

  The Boys in the Boat: The True Story of an American Team's Epic Journey to Win Gold at the 1936 Olympics by Daniel James Brown tells the story of the University of Washington’s 1936 eight-oar crew and their epic quest for an Olympic gold medal, a team that transformed the sport and grabbed the attention of millions of Americans. The sons of loggers, shipyard workers, and farmers, the boys defeated elite rivals first from eastern and British universities and finally the German crew rowing for Adolf Hitler in the Olympic games in Berlin, 1936.

First released in 2013, the best-selling book has been released in a Young Readers Adaptation by Viking Books.

  The history of the Catskills is pivotal in the history of our country that is described in great detail in Stephen Silverman’s, The Catskills: Its History and How It Changed America.

Silverman’s book brings to life the beauty, vastness and turning points of the Catskills history, sharing stimulating stories of the region’s influential entrepreneurs, artists, gangsters, politicians, musicians and outcasts.

Vital to the development of America, the Catskills region was the birthplace of New York’s own Declaration of Independence, a central location for America’s industrial revolution, a rising resort town with hundreds of hotels and an artistic muse for the 19th century Hudson River School of Art and 20th century entertainers like Mel Brooks, Woody Allen, and Joan Rivers.


  Life in the Mohawk Valley today is vastly different from generations ago. Long gone are the factory whistles calling workers to their shifts in old mill towns. Fort Plain still benefits from little-known inventor William Yerdon, and Utica baseball player George Burns was so skilled that fans called left field Burnsville.

Few realize that a local artist shared a special bond with John Philip Sousa, one of the nations greatest musicians. The Tamarack Playhouse was once the venue of spectacular theatricals, and as time goes on, there are fewer alumni to remember Amsterdams Bishop Scully High School.

Local author and local broadcasting legend Bob Cudmore shows that while lost, these and other compelling stories no longer need be forgotten.

 In his new book The Year Of Lear: Shakespeare In 1606, James Shapiro offers a portrait of one of the most inspired moments in William Shakespeare's career, the extraordinary year he completed King Lear and then went on to write the two other great tragedies Macbeth and Antony and Cleopatra. Shapiro, a preeminent Shakespeare scholar and author of the previous books, A Year in the Life of Shakespeare: 1599 and Contested Will sheds new light on these plays by placing them in the context of their time.

  In this week’s Classical Music According to Yehuda, Alan Chartock and Yehuda Hanani begin a series of discussions about Igor Stravinsky.

  This Saturday, the Washington County Historical Society will present the program: “When Johnny Comes Marching Home Again: 150 Years since the End of the Civil War and the Return of Our Own 123rd Regiment” in Salem, NY.

Joining us: Pat Niles, retired high school history teacher from Salem who is a Washington Co. Historical Society board member and is scheduled to be the next WCHS president. Also joining us is Mike Russert who is a retired teacher from Hoosick Falls Central. He is an expert on local history with a particular interest in the 123rd Regiment from Washington Co. He will be a speaker at the 9/26 event.

Debi Craig is a board member and former president of the WCHS, she is the Event Coordinator for “When Johnny Comes Marching Home Again” and chairperson of the Programming Committee.

  William F. Buckley, Jr., and Norman Mailer were the two towering intellectual figures of the 1960s, and they lived remarkably parallel lives. Both became best-selling authors in their twenties; both started hugely influential papers (National Review and the Village Voice); both ran for mayor of New York City; both were noted for their exceptional wit and venom; and both became the figurehead of their respective social movements (Buckley on the right, Mailer on the left). Indeed, Buckley and Mailer argued vociferously and publicly about every major issue of their time: civil rights, feminism, the counterculture, Vietnam, the Cold War.

But behind the scenes, the two were close friends and trusted confidantes. In Buckley and Mailer: The Difficult Friendship That Shaped the Sixties, historian Kevin M. Schultz delves into their personal archives to tell the rich story of their friendship, their arguments, and the tumultuous decade they did so much to shape.

  Confucius is perhaps the most important philosopher in history. Today, his teachings shape the daily lives of more than 1.6 billion people.

Throughout East Asia, Confucius’s influence can be seen in everything from business practices and family relationships to educational standards and government policies. Even as western ideas from Christianity to Communism have bombarded the region, Confucius’s doctrine has endured as the foundation of East Asian culture.

Michael Schuman's new book is Confucius: And the World He Created.

  Kermit Roosevelt, University of Pennsylvania Law Professor and Theodore Roosevelt’s Great Great Grandson, combines the momentum of a top-notch legal thriller with a thoughtful examination of one of the worst civil rights violations in US history in Allegiance: A Novel.

The Roosevelt Library and Museum will present an author talk and book signing with Kermit Roosevelt at 7 o'clock tonight in the Henry A. Wallace Center at the FDR Presidential Library and Home.