history

  Reeling from the Great Depression, the United States and Germany elected two new leaders of diametrically opposing ideologies. In 1932, Franklin Roosevelt won the presidency and Adolf Hitler became chancellor.

Author and historian David Pietrusza will discuss his new book - 1932: The Rise of Hitler and FDR–Two Tales of Politics, Betrayal, and Unlikely Destiny.

  License to Quill is a James Bond-esque spy thriller starring William Shakespeare and Christopher Marlowe during history's real life Gunpowder Plot.

The story follows the fascinating golden age of English espionage, the tumultuous cold war gripping post-Reformation Europe, and the cloak-and-dagger politics of Renaissance England. Readers will frequent the same taverns as Shakespeare, test their wits against the infamous Guy Fawkes, witness the miracles of the scientific revolution, and delight in the mysterious origins of the Bard's most haunting play: Macbeth.

'Trace' By Lauret Savoy

Dec 14, 2015

  While many geologists focus their inquiry on the Earth, probing contours of the land to reveal how past developments have come to shape the present, Lauret Savoy’s new book, Trace, takes a more personal journey.

Lauret Edith Savoy is a woman of mixed heritage, and a professor of environmental studies and geology at Mount Holyoke College, where she explores the intertwinings of natural and cultural histories. She is a self-described “Earth historian” and in the new book traces her Native, African-, Euro-American ancestry across the United States in the hope of learning what her extended family experienced.

Following his acclaimed Atlantic and The Men Who United the States, New York Times bestselling author Simon Winchester offers an enthralling biography of the Pacific Ocean and its role in the modern world, exploring our relationship with this imposing force of nature. Simon Winchester discusses his new book, Pacific, on this week’s Book Show.

Listener Essay - Legacy

Dec 8, 2015

  Carole Owens is an author and historian. 

Legacy

Sunday morning, “December 7, 1941, a date that will live in infamy.”

My grandfather was at Pearl Harbor. Sometime between 7:53 and 9:55 a.m., he was hit by shrapnel – nasty chunks of metal packed into bombs.

There are a number of iconic elements that make up New York City, The Empire State Building, Time Square, Rockefeller Center, The Statue of Liberty, but long before these landmarks could come to define "The Big City" its very structure had to be developed. The new book City on a Grid: How New York Became New York, tells just that story. How New York City's streets came to form its rectilinear grid that millions of people now walk through everyday.

In his new book The Age of Clinton: America In The 1990s, historian Gil Troy, asks us to look past our prejudices about William Jefferson Clinton's Presidency and instead focus on the way in which his time in office shaped the culture of the 1990's. The book also of course sheds light on Hillary Clinton's Political career as we approach the 2016 Presidential Election.

A child of wealth and privilege possessing unlimited will and ambition, Franklin Delano Roosevelt, seemed destined for the presidency. The nation he lead was large in population, rich in resources, committed to a universal ideology of liberal democracy, and destined for grand geopolitical power. A man and a nation were each poised on the brink of greatness. FDR's twelve years in The White House culminated in what can justly be called an 'American century'. This convergence of individual and national destinies created a large and complex story that remains essential to our understanding the world in which we live in today. 

Ron Livingston plays John Carver in a new miniseries about the Pilgrims.
National Geographic Channcel

You might not immediately recognize Ron Livingston in the new miniseries Saints & Strangers, the two-night story of the Pilgrims’ arrival at Plymouth that debuts Sunday at 9 on the National Geographic Channel.

The actor known to a generation of fans from movies like Swingers and Office Space and series like Sex and the City and Band of Brothers appears under a matted mane as John Carver, the first governor of Plymouth Colony whose struggles began on the Mayflower and only got worse in the new world.

  Even with last week's terror attack, Paris is still the City of Light. Luc Sante wants us to remember that Paris has a history of the city of the poor, the eccentric, the outcast, the willfully nonconforming. In his book The Other Paris, gives us a panoramic view of that second metropolis, which has nearly vanished but whose remains in the bricks and stones of the contemporary city, in the culture of the city itself, and by extension, around the world. 

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