history

The Roundtable
11:12 am
Tue December 2, 2014

'The Churchill Factor: How One Man Made History' By Boris Johnson

    

  Fearless on the battlefield, Churchill had to be ordered by the king to stay out of action on D-Day; he pioneered aerial bombing and few could match his experience in organizing violence on a colossal scale, yet he hated war and scorned politicians who had not experienced its horrors. He was the most famous journalist of his time and perhaps the greatest orator of all time, despite a lisp and chronic depression he kept at bay by painting.

On the fiftieth anniversary of Churchill’s death, Boris Johnson celebrates the brilliance of one of the most important leaders of the twentieth century in the book, The Churchill Factor: How One Man Made History.

The Roundtable
11:52 am
Mon November 17, 2014

'Striking Gridiron' By Greg Nichols

  In the summer of 1959, most of the town of Braddock, Pennsylvania---along with half a million steel workers around the country---went on strike in the longest labor stoppage in American history. With no paychecks coming in, the families of Braddock looked to its football team for inspiration.

Author and journalist Greg Nichols writes about it in his book, Striking Gridiron: A Town's Pride and a Team's Shot at Glory During the Biggest Strike in American History.

The Roundtable
11:35 am
Tue November 11, 2014

Veterans Day - 'When The War Came Home' By Bill Newman

"Bring the War Home," which had been a rallying cry of the anti-Vietnam-War movement, was transformed on May 4, 1970 into a macabre irony when the Ohio National Guard opened fire on student anti-war protesters at Kent State, killing four and wounding nine. Many, certainly not all, of the anti-war student activists were chauvinist, privileged, white men.

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The Roundtable
10:35 am
Fri November 7, 2014

Ideas Matter - New York State History Month

  We are very happy to continue our regular feature – Ideas Matter: Checking in with the Public Humanities. It is our chance to check in with the Humanities Councils throughout our 7-State area to discuss important ideas and why they do indeed matter.

Today we check in with Bob Weible, New York State Historian and Chief Curator for the New York State Museum, and learn about New York History Month.

The Roundtable
11:35 am
Mon October 27, 2014

'Windsor Mountain School: A Beloved Berkshire Tradition'

  The Windsor Mountain School in Lenox, Massachusetts was an ahead of its time boarding school that honored diversity and became the first co-ed integrated boarding school in the Berkshires.

After being a target of the Nazi regime, Max and Gertrud Bondy came to America and opened their school in Windsor, Vermont and later moved to Lenox in 1944.

Families like the Belafontes, Poitiers and Campanellas were attracted to the school for its multi-cultural and international curriculum. Then the school closed in 1975.

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The Roundtable
10:10 am
Fri October 17, 2014

'The Marquis: Lafayette Reconsidered'

  The Marquis: Lafayette Reconsidered by Laura Auricchio is major biography of the Marquis de Lafayette, French hero of the American Revolution, who, at age nineteen, volunteered to fight under George Washington.

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WAMC Programs
3:06 pm
Tue October 14, 2014

The Book Show #1369 - Nancy Horan

    In her followup to the best-selling Loving Frank, Nancy Horan recounts the improbably love affair between Scottish author, Robert Louis Stevenson and his American wife, Fanny Osbourne.

In The Wide and Starry Sky, Horan invites us to explore The Stevensons unusual relationship and the ways they changed the literary and artistic landscape around them.

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The Roundtable
10:35 am
Mon October 13, 2014

"Redeemer: The Life Of Jimmy Carter" By Randall Balmer

  Evangelical Christianity and conservative politics are today seen as inseparable. But when Jimmy Carter, a Democrat and a born-again Christian, won the presidency in 1976, he owed his victory in part to American evangelicals, who responded to his open religiosity and his rejection of the moral bankruptcy of the Nixon Administration. Carter, running as a representative of the New South, articulated a progressive strand of American Christianity that championed liberal ideals, racial equality, and social justice—one that has almost been forgotten since.

In Redeemer: The Life of Jimmy Carter, acclaimed religious historian Randall Balmer reveals how the rise and fall of Jimmy Carter’s political fortunes mirrored the transformation of American religious politics.

The Roundtable
11:35 am
Mon September 29, 2014

Carter, Begin, And Sadat At Camp David

  Thirteen Days in September: Carter, Begin, and Sadat at Camp David is a day-by-day account of the 1978 Camp David conference, when President Jimmy Carter persuaded Israeli prime minister Menachem Begin and Egyptian president Anwar Sadat to sign the first peace treaty in the modern Middle East, one which endures to this day.

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The Roundtable
11:12 am
Thu September 25, 2014

Carey Harrison And 'Who Was That Lady?"

  Our next guest’s background is so fascinating – it is hard to know where to begin. Prize-winning novelist, playwright, theater director and actor Carey Harrison was born in London in February 1944, during the World War Two 'Blitz' that rained down bombs on the city. His parents, stage and screen actors Rex Harrison and Lilli Palmer, brought him to Los Angeles when he was a year old, and then to New York when he was 5.

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