history

    In more than a century of vampires in pop culture, only one lord of the night truly stands out: Dracula. Though the name may conjure up images of Bela Lugosi lurking about in a cape and white pancake makeup in the iconic 1931 film, the character of Dracula—a powerful, evil Transylvanian aristocrat who slaughters repressed Victorians on a trip to London—was created in Bram Stoker’s 1897 novel of the same name, a work so popular it has spawned limitless reinventions in books and film.

But where did literature’s undead icon come from?

    In modern memory, Winston Churchill remains the man with the cigar and the equanimity among the ruins. Few can remember that at the age of 40, he was considered washed up, his best days behind him.

Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library and Museum

    On Friday, the Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library and Museum in Hyde Park, New York kicked off their "100 Days" Countdown to the public opening of the Roosevelt Library's new permanent museum exhibits on June 30th. Today marks 97 days.

These exhibits will tell the story of the Roosevelt presidency beginning in the depths of the Great Depression and continuing through the New Deal years and World War II with an emphasis on both Franklin and Eleanor Roosevelt’s relationship with the American people. Special interactives, immersive audio‐visual theaters, and rarely seen artifacts will convey the dramatic story of the Roosevelt era as the Roosevelt Library brings a New Deal to a New Generation.

To help us countdown, we welcome Lynn Bassanese, Director of the FDR Presidential Library and Museum and Felica Wong, President and CEO of the Roosevelt Institute.

New Haven Colony Historical Society and Adams National Historic Site

NEW HAVEN, Conn. (AP) — The Connecticut Historical Society has purchased a collection of letters written in the 1830s and 1840s by a woman describing the lives of the African captives from the slave ship Amistad.

The society paid $66,000 Tuesday for the letters written by Charlotte Cowles, whose abolitionist family took in one of the former Amistad captives.

Cowles described a captive showing her where she was burned on her shoulder with a red-hot pipe in Africa and her interactions with the leader of the captives.

      The Accursed is a major historical novel from Joyce Carol Oates - an eerie, unforgettable story of possession, power, and loss in early-twentieth-century Princeton, a cultural crossroads of the powerful and the damned.

      Drawing on more than a decade of research in secret Pentagon files and extensive interviews with American veterans and Vietnamese survivors, Nick Turse reveals for the first time how official policies resulted in millions of innocent civilians killed and wounded. In shocking detail, he lays out the workings of a military machine that made crimes in almost every major American combat unit all but inevitable.

His book is Kill Anything That Moves: The Real American War in Vietnam.

How did a prisoner of war survive six years and eight months of soul-crushing imprisonment in the Hanoi Hilton during the Vietnam War? By writing poetry. And how did he do it without pencil or paper?

Then-Captain John Borling "wrote" and memorized poems to keep his mind sharp and spirits up. He shared his creations with fellow captives by their only means of communication—the forbidden POW tap code. Rapping on the cell walls with his knuckles, he tapped poems, certainly of pain and despair, but also of humor, encouragement, and hope, to keep everyone’s strength and spirits alive.

John Borling joins us to talk about Taps on the Walls: Poems from the Hanoi Hilton.

Courtesy UMass Amherst

Mahatma Gandhi once said, “…truth cannot be found by violent means.” That idea is currently the topic of the course Ideas that Changed the World at the University of Massachusetts Amherst.

Tonight, UMass Amherst history professor and associate dean of the school’s Commonwealth Honors College, Daniel Gordon, will present a lecture titled The Fatal Truth: the Cult of Violence in Western Political Thought. He spoke with WAMC’s Patrick Donges.

unisonarts.org

  Actor, singer, athlete, scholar, and social activist, Paul Robeson, was born in 1898 and died at 77 years old in 1976 having been blacklisted during the Second Red Scare in the 1950s but – until the end of his life sticking to his political stances and his beliefs.

To celebrate Black History Month, Unison Arts in New Paltz, NY has partnered with the Black Studies and Fine and Performing Arts Departments at SUNY New Paltz to present Phillip Hayes Dean’s play Paul Robeson.

    Ward Wilson is a senior fellow at the Center for Nonproliferation Studies of the Monterey Institute of International Studies. He has spoken before governments and at think tanks and universities on the issue of Nuclear Weapons.

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