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The Roundtable
10:30 am
Fri October 18, 2013

Ideas Matter: NY Council For The Humanities' Vampires, Mummies, And Frankenstein: Oh My!

Ankhefenmut - Albany Institute of History & Art

    This morning we spotlight New York Council for the Humanities and get seasonal and talk about their spooky humanities projects across New York.

We are joined by: Dr. Tim Madigan, Associate Professor of Philosophy and Director of Irish Studies at St. John Fisher College. Tim, in addition to giving talks about Frankenstein through the Council's Speakers in the Humanities program, is the organizer of a one-day public conference, "The Irish Vampire," exploring the life and influence of the Irish novelist, Bram Stoker, and his immortal 1897 work, Dracula.

Erika Sanger, Director of Education, The Albany Institute of History & Art. Erika joins us to talk about the exciting slate of programs she's organized around The Albany's Institute new exhibit, The Mystery of the Albany Mummies, specifically an upcoming project on Amenhotep's Mask and the Book of the Dead.

Anne Field of the Friends of the Town of Pelham Library is here to talk about Pelham Reads Frankenstein, a community-wide reading festival around Mary Shelley's 19th century classic novel.

New England News
4:33 pm
Sun September 29, 2013

Understanding Filibusters

Donald Ritchie presenting his lecture “Why in the World Does the Senate Put Up with Filibusters?” at Williams College.
Credit Jim Levulis / WAMC

While Republican U.S. Senator Ted Cruz’s recent 21-hour talk on the Senate floor wasn’t a filibuster, the parliamentary procedure is certainly a unique part of our nation’s political workings.

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The Roundtable
11:35 am
Wed September 4, 2013

Albany Ale Project

    In 2010, beer bloggers Alan McLeod and Craig Gravina stumbled across an early 19th century advertisement for Albany Ale—but what exactly was Albany Ale? That question took them on a journey through history spanning nearly 400 years—from the arrival of the first Dutch brewers to the 21st century.

Along the way, the duo has re-discovered the city’s mid-19th century phenomenon—a double-strength XX ale, brewed across the city and exported around the world—known as Albany Ale. Growing since 2010, this international research endeavor has been dubbed the Albany Ale Project, and is focused on bringing the history and stories of an industry that helped to build the capital city of New York to light.

Roger Savoy of Hennessy Home Brew Emporium and Ryan Demler of the Pump Station in Albany join us to tell us more.

The Roundtable
10:35 am
Fri August 23, 2013

"The White Princess" by Philippa Gregory

The Roundtable
11:30 am
Wed August 7, 2013

"Bolivar" by Marie Arana

    

  Simón Bolivar freed six countries from Spanish rule, traveled more than 75,000 miles on horseback to do so, and became the greatest figure in Latin American history. His life is epic, heroic, straight out of Hollywood: he fought battle after battle in punishing terrain, forged uncertain coalitions of competing forces and races, lost his beautiful wife soon after they married and never remarried (although he did have a succession of mistresses, including one who held up the revolution and another who saved his life), and he died relatively young, uncertain whether his achievements would endure.

Drawing on a wealth of primary documents, novelist and journalist Marie Arana brilliantly captures early nineteenth-century South America and the explosive tensions that helped revolutionize Bolívar.

The Roundtable
11:12 am
Fri July 19, 2013

"Capital of the World" by Charlene Mires

    From 1944 to 1946, as the world pivoted from the Second World War to an unsteady peace, Americans in more than two hundred cities and towns mobilized to chase an implausible dream. The newly-created United Nations needed a meeting place, a central place for global diplomacy—a Capital of the World.

But what would it look like, and where would it be? Author Charlene Mires share the history with us.

The Roundtable
10:45 am
Thu June 27, 2013

"Time No Longer: Americans After the American Century" by Patrick Smith

    Americans cherish their national myths, some of which predate the country’s founding. But the time for illusions, nostalgia, and grand ambition abroad has gone by, according to journalist Patrick Smith in his new book, Time No Longer.

He says Americans are now faced with a choice between a mythical idea of themselves, their nation, and their global “mission,” on the one hand, and on the other an idea of America that is rooted in historical consciousness.

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The Roundtable
11:12 am
Fri June 14, 2013

"Saving Italy: The Race to Rescue a Nation's Treasures from the Nazis" by Robert Edsel

    When Hitler’s armies occupied Italy in 1943, they also seized control of mankind’s greatest cultural treasures. As they had done throughout Europe, the Nazis could now plunder the masterpieces of the Renaissance, the treasures of the Vatican, and the antiquities of the Roman Empire. 

Robert Edsel joins us to talk about the efforts to save Italy’s great artistic treasures from the Nazis. 

His book is Saving Italy: The Race to Rescue a Nation's Treasures from the Nazis.

The Roundtable
10:35 am
Fri May 31, 2013

Ideas Matter: MASS Humanities and Reading Frederick Douglass

  We are very happy to continue our new regular feature on The Roundtable, entitled – Ideas Matter: Checking in with the Public Humanities. It is our chance to check in with the Humanities Councils throughout our 7-State area to discuss important ideas and why they do indeed matter.

This morning we spotlight MASS Humanities and specifically we’ll talk about Reading Frederick Douglass. Our guests this morning are Pleun Bouricius, Assistant Director, Mass Humanities and Don Quinn Kelley, Founding Co-Chair Lift Ev'ry Voice Festival.

The Roundtable
10:35 am
Wed May 22, 2013

Chesterwoood Vintage Motorcar Festival

    Chesterwood, the country home, studio, and gardens of America’s foremost public sculptor – Daniel Chester French is holding their Vintage Motorcar Festival this Sunday, May 26th – rain or shine – from 10am to 4pm.

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