history

The Roundtable
10:10 am
Wed May 7, 2014

"A Higher Call" By Adam Makos

    

  Four days before Christmas 1943, a badly damaged American bomber struggled to fly over wartime Germany. At its controls was a 21-year-old pilot. Half his crew lay wounded or dead. It was their first mission. Suddenly, a sleek, dark shape pulled up on the bomber’s tail—a German fighter. Worse, the German pilot was an ace, a man able to destroy the American bomber in the squeeze of a trigger. What happened next would defy imagination and later be called the most incredible encounter between enemies in World War II.

This is the true story of the two pilots whose lives collided in the skies that day—the American—2nd Lieutenant Charlie Brown, a former farm boy from West Virginia who came to captain a B-17—and the German—2nd Lieutenant Franz Stigler, a former airline pilot from Bavaria who sought to avoid fighting in World War II.

The story is told in historian Adam Makos’ new book - A Higher Call - that follows both Charlie and Franz’s harrowing missions.

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The Roundtable
11:35 am
Tue May 6, 2014

"The Rise Of The Tudors" By Chris Skidmore

    In his comprehensive history, The Rise of the Tudors, Chris Skidmore chronicles the early story of the Tudors, beginning with the birth of the future Henry VII and following his life through the tumultuous Wars of the Roses, which ended with Henry’s coronation.

The Roundtable
10:10 am
Mon April 28, 2014

"Money: The Unauthorized Biography" By Felix Martin

    From ancient currency to Adam Smith, from the gold standard to shadow banking and the Great Recession: a sweeping historical epic that traces the development and evolution of one of humankind’s greatest inventions.

What is money, and how does it work? In Money: The Unauthorized Biography, Felix Martin challenges nothing less than our conventional understanding of money.

The Roundtable
10:10 am
Wed April 16, 2014

"The Parthenon Enigma" By Joan Breton Connelly

    

  Built in the fifth century b.c., the Parthenon has been venerated for more than two millennia as the West’s ultimate paragon of beauty and proportion. Since the Enlightenment, it has also come to represent our political ideals, the lavish temple to the goddess Athena serving as the model for our most hallowed civic architecture. But how much do the values of those who built the Parthenon truly correspond with our own?

In The Parthenon Enigma, Joan Breton Connelly challenges our most basic assumptions about the Parthenon and the ancient Athenians.

The Roundtable
11:12 am
Fri April 11, 2014

Hancock Shaker Village

    The 750-acre Hancock Shaker Village operates as a living-history museum open to the public with 20 authentic Shaker buildings, costumed interpreters, rich collections of Shaker furniture and artifacts in rotating exhibits, a full schedule of activities and workshops, a mile-long hiking trail and picnic areas, a Village Store and Village Cafe, and a working farm with extensive gardens and heritage-breed livestock.

They kick of their busy season this Saturday, April 12th with Baby Animals!

Shawn Hartley Hancock is the Director of Marketing & Communications at Hancock Shaker Village and she joins along with Shaker Singers - Todd Burdick, Margaret Carlough, Jim Day, Stephanie Guelpa, and Julie Smith.

The Roundtable
10:10 am
Thu April 10, 2014

"Dying Every Day: Seneca At The Court Of Nero" By James Romm

    James Romm, the James Ottaway Jr. Professor of Classics at Bard College is the author of several books on ancient Greek and Macedonian history and on imperial Rome. His latest book is: Dying Every Day: Seneca at the Court of Nero.

At the center, the tumultuous life of Seneca, ancient Rome’s preeminent writer and philosopher, beginning with banishment in his fifties and subsequent appointment as tutor to twelve-year-old Nero, future emperor of Rome. Controlling them both, Nero’s mother, Julia Agrippina the Younger, Roman empress, great-granddaughter of the Emperor Augustus, sister of the Emperor Caligula, niece and fourth wife of Emperor Claudius.

James Romm will be part of this weekend’s Read Local Red Hook Literary Festival.

The Roundtable
11:35 am
Wed April 9, 2014

"The Heathen School: A Story Of Hope And Betrayal In The Age Of The Early Republic" By John Demos

    Near the start of the nineteenth century, as the newly established United States looked outward toward the wider world, a group of eminent Protestant ministers formed a grand scheme for gathering the rest of mankind into the redemptive fold of Christianity and “civilization.” Its core element was a special school for “heathen youth” drawn from all parts of the earth, including the Pacific Islands, China, India, and, increasingly, the native nations of North America.

The Heathen School follows the progress, and the demise, of this first true melting pot through the lives of individual students: among them, Henry Obookiah, a young Hawaiian who ran away from home and worked as a seaman in the China Trade before ending up in New England; John Ridge, son of a powerful Cherokee chief and subsequently a leader in the process of Indian “removal”; and Elias Boudinot, editor of the first newspaper published by and for Native Americans.

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The Roundtable
11:12 am
Mon March 24, 2014

"Hundred Days: The Campaign That Ended World War I" By Nick Lloyd

    In the late summer of 1918, after four long years of senseless, stagnant fighting, the Western Front erupted. The bitter four-month struggle that ensued—known as the Hundred Days Campaign—saw some of the bloodiest and most ferocious combat of the Great War, as the Allies grimly worked to break the stalemate in the west and end the conflict that had decimated Europe.

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The Roundtable
10:35 am
Fri March 21, 2014

Ideas Matter - History Day In Connecticut

   This morning in our Ideas Matter segment, we spotlight the Connecticut Humanities Council and learn about History Day In Connecticut.

CT History Day is part of the National History Day which helps students understand how to "do" history and why our history is important.

The program reaches hundreds of schools and thousands of children. It's a way of investing in a future audience for history and the humanities and helps CT students connect directly with the history of their country and their state.

The Roundtable
11:35 am
Mon March 17, 2014

"Wondrous Beauty: The Life And Adventures Of Elizabeth Patterson Bonaparte" By Carol Berkin

    

  Elizabeth Patterson Bonaparte was renowned as the most beautiful woman of nineteenth-century Baltimore. Her marriage in 1803 to Jérôme Bonaparte, the youngest brother of Napoleon Bonaparte, became inextricably bound to the diplomatic and political histories of the United States, France, and England.

In Wondrous Beauty, Carol Berkin tells the story of this audacious, outsized life.

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