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The Roundtable
10:35 am
Fri August 23, 2013

"The White Princess" by Philippa Gregory

The Roundtable
11:30 am
Wed August 7, 2013

"Bolivar" by Marie Arana

    

  Simón Bolivar freed six countries from Spanish rule, traveled more than 75,000 miles on horseback to do so, and became the greatest figure in Latin American history. His life is epic, heroic, straight out of Hollywood: he fought battle after battle in punishing terrain, forged uncertain coalitions of competing forces and races, lost his beautiful wife soon after they married and never remarried (although he did have a succession of mistresses, including one who held up the revolution and another who saved his life), and he died relatively young, uncertain whether his achievements would endure.

Drawing on a wealth of primary documents, novelist and journalist Marie Arana brilliantly captures early nineteenth-century South America and the explosive tensions that helped revolutionize Bolívar.

The Roundtable
10:45 am
Thu June 27, 2013

"Time No Longer: Americans After the American Century" by Patrick Smith

    Americans cherish their national myths, some of which predate the country’s founding. But the time for illusions, nostalgia, and grand ambition abroad has gone by, according to journalist Patrick Smith in his new book, Time No Longer.

He says Americans are now faced with a choice between a mythical idea of themselves, their nation, and their global “mission,” on the one hand, and on the other an idea of America that is rooted in historical consciousness.

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The Roundtable
11:12 am
Fri June 14, 2013

"Saving Italy: The Race to Rescue a Nation's Treasures from the Nazis" by Robert Edsel

    When Hitler’s armies occupied Italy in 1943, they also seized control of mankind’s greatest cultural treasures. As they had done throughout Europe, the Nazis could now plunder the masterpieces of the Renaissance, the treasures of the Vatican, and the antiquities of the Roman Empire. 

Robert Edsel joins us to talk about the efforts to save Italy’s great artistic treasures from the Nazis. 

His book is Saving Italy: The Race to Rescue a Nation's Treasures from the Nazis.

The Roundtable
10:35 am
Fri May 31, 2013

Ideas Matter: MASS Humanities and Reading Frederick Douglass

  We are very happy to continue our new regular feature on The Roundtable, entitled – Ideas Matter: Checking in with the Public Humanities. It is our chance to check in with the Humanities Councils throughout our 7-State area to discuss important ideas and why they do indeed matter.

This morning we spotlight MASS Humanities and specifically we’ll talk about Reading Frederick Douglass. Our guests this morning are Pleun Bouricius, Assistant Director, Mass Humanities and Don Quinn Kelley, Founding Co-Chair Lift Ev'ry Voice Festival.

The Roundtable
10:35 am
Wed May 22, 2013

Chesterwoood Vintage Motorcar Festival

    Chesterwood, the country home, studio, and gardens of America’s foremost public sculptor – Daniel Chester French is holding their Vintage Motorcar Festival this Sunday, May 26th – rain or shine – from 10am to 4pm.

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The Roundtable
11:12 am
Tue May 14, 2013

"Vintage Tomorrows" by James H. Carrott and Brian David Johnson

    What would today’s technology look like with Victorian-era design and materials? That’s the world steampunk envisions: a mad-inventor collection of 21st century-inspired contraptions powered by steam and driven by gears.

In this book, futurist Brian David Johnson and cultural historian James Carrott explore steampunk, a cultural movement that’s captivated thousands of artists, designers, makers, hackers, and writers throughout the world.

The Roundtable
10:10 am
Tue April 23, 2013

Book Picks - Northshire Bookstore

  This week's Book Picks list comes from Bill Lewis of Northshire Bookstore.

List after the break.

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The Roundtable
10:35 am
Wed April 10, 2013

"Operation Storm" by John Geoghegan

    Operation Storm: Japan's Top Secret Submarines and Its Plan to Change the Course of World War II tells the riveting true story of Japan's top secret plan to change the course of World War II using a squadron of mammoth submarines a generation ahead of their time.

John Geoghegan has written extensively about aviation history, underwater exploration and marine engineering for The New York Times Science Section, Smithsonian Air & Space, WIRED, Popular Science, Aviation History, Military Heritage, Flight Journal and the San Francisco Chronicle Sunday Magazine.

WAMC Programs
3:06 pm
Tue April 9, 2013

The Book Show #1290 - Tara Conklin

    In Tara Conklin's debut novel, The House Girl: A Novel, two remarkable women, separated by more than a century, live lives that unexpectedly intertwine.

2004: Lina Sparrow is an ambitious young lawyer working on a historic class-action lawsuit seeking reparations for the descendants of American slaves.

1852: Josephine is a seventeen-year-old house slave who tends to the mistress of a Virginia tobacco farm—an aspiring artist named Lu Anne Bell.

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