history

The Roundtable
10:10 am
Mon March 18, 2013

"Kill Anything That Moves: The Real American War in Vietnam" by Nick Turse

      Drawing on more than a decade of research in secret Pentagon files and extensive interviews with American veterans and Vietnamese survivors, Nick Turse reveals for the first time how official policies resulted in millions of innocent civilians killed and wounded. In shocking detail, he lays out the workings of a military machine that made crimes in almost every major American combat unit all but inevitable.

His book is Kill Anything That Moves: The Real American War in Vietnam.

The Roundtable
11:45 am
Fri March 8, 2013

"Taps on the Walls: Poems from the Hanoi Hilton"

How did a prisoner of war survive six years and eight months of soul-crushing imprisonment in the Hanoi Hilton during the Vietnam War? By writing poetry. And how did he do it without pencil or paper?

Then-Captain John Borling "wrote" and memorized poems to keep his mind sharp and spirits up. He shared his creations with fellow captives by their only means of communication—the forbidden POW tap code. Rapping on the cell walls with his knuckles, he tapped poems, certainly of pain and despair, but also of humor, encouragement, and hope, to keep everyone’s strength and spirits alive.

John Borling joins us to talk about Taps on the Walls: Poems from the Hanoi Hilton.

WAMC News
6:00 pm
Tue March 5, 2013

Daniel Gordon, UMass Amherst - The Fatal Truth: the Cult of Violence in Western Political Thought

Credit Courtesy UMass Amherst

Mahatma Gandhi once said, “…truth cannot be found by violent means.” That idea is currently the topic of the course Ideas that Changed the World at the University of Massachusetts Amherst.

Tonight, UMass Amherst history professor and associate dean of the school’s Commonwealth Honors College, Daniel Gordon, will present a lecture titled The Fatal Truth: the Cult of Violence in Western Political Thought. He spoke with WAMC’s Patrick Donges.

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Arts & Culture
11:12 am
Thu January 31, 2013

Phillip Hayes Dean’s "Paul Robeson" presented by Unison Arts and SUNY New Paltz

Credit unisonarts.org

  Actor, singer, athlete, scholar, and social activist, Paul Robeson, was born in 1898 and died at 77 years old in 1976 having been blacklisted during the Second Red Scare in the 1950s but – until the end of his life sticking to his political stances and his beliefs.

To celebrate Black History Month, Unison Arts in New Paltz, NY has partnered with the Black Studies and Fine and Performing Arts Departments at SUNY New Paltz to present Phillip Hayes Dean’s play Paul Robeson.

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The Roundtable
9:35 am
Wed January 30, 2013

"Five Myths about Nuclear Weapons" by Ward Wilson

    Ward Wilson is a senior fellow at the Center for Nonproliferation Studies of the Monterey Institute of International Studies. He has spoken before governments and at think tanks and universities on the issue of Nuclear Weapons.

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The Roundtable
11:35 am
Tue January 29, 2013

"The Untold Story of Champ: A Social History of America's Loch Ness Monster"

Sociologist Robert Bartholomew joins us to talk about his work which takes journalists to task for sloppy reporting and criticizes local tourist bureaus for their singular focus on Champ Dollars.

His book, The Untold Story of Champ: A Social History of America's Loch Ness Monster (Excelsior Editions) presents the most complete history of Champ from Native American lore to the modern-day monster hunters.

Arts & Culture
11:35 am
Fri January 18, 2013

Classical Music According to Yehuda #106

Credit funzine.hu

In this week’s “Classical Music According to Yehuda,” Alan Chartock and Yehuda Hanani discuss what makes some art offensive to certain groups.

The Roundtable
9:35 am
Fri January 18, 2013

An Inauguration Day history lesson from Kenneth C. Davis

      As President Barack Obama readies for his second term, popular historian Kenneth C. Davis joins us with an Inauguration Day history lesson.

Davis is author of the “Don’t Know Much About History” series and his new book is Don't Know Much About® the American Presidents.

The Roundtable
10:10 am
Mon January 14, 2013

"Invisible Armies: An Epic History of Guerrilla Warfare from Ancient Times to the Present"

A Senior Fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations and a military historian, Max Boot is a regular contributor to the Wall Street Journal. His new book is: Invisible Armies: An Epic History of Guerrilla Warfare from Ancient Times to the Present.

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Arts & Culture
11:50 am
Fri January 11, 2013

Classical Music According to Yehuda #105

Paul Robeson

In this week’s Classical Music According to Yehuda, Alan Chartock and Yehuda Hanani discuss how interpretation can change through history, hearing “Swing Low, Sweet Chariot,” sung by Paul Robeson.

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